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I'm Fully Rugged Now

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  • I'm Fully Rugged Now

    I just bought a Fully Rugged laptop. (Military STD 810f)

    I struggled with this decision weather to buy a cheap laptop that I wouldn't care about bouncing around but if it crapped out I'd lose any stored info. I know myself well enough that I would drop it on ocassion and likey put my stinky sewer fingers all over the keyboard before washing them off. This thing is practically waterproof.

    It's 2 years old but looks brand new. Loaded with features Bluetooth, GPS, built in wireless G, hot swappable drives, touchscreen and backlit glow in the dark keyboard for those night reconnaissance missions

    It's made by General Dynamics I would compare it to the Panasonic ToughBook

    Ebay, under $400 delivered

    For you guys that work out of your truck everyday what are you using?

    Now how do I transfer all my files from the desktop to laptop?

    Need advice on a bluetooth printer
    Last edited by plumberscrack; 09-11-2008, 06:25 PM.

  • #2
    Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

    I currently have three laptops and a tablet on the truck. The laptops are really for use in the hotel and the tablet is for working in the field. The tablet is a Fujitsu ST5112 with a bump resistant hard drive. Depending on what I am doing it is either in a Fujitsu Bump Case or an OtterBox case.

    To transfer files I used a WD Passport with a 160GB capacity.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #3
      Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

      I'm not sure I'd trust the hard drive from a 2 year old used computer. I would put in a new one for peace of mind. I usually don't trust any drive that is over 3 years old, even less for a laptop. Just remember that no matter how though the machine is, the hard drive is all that matters when it comes to keeping your data safe, everything else can be replaced if it breaks. It doesn't matter how much protection the laptop has to keep it from breaking, the g-shock from a drop or impact is easily the biggest enemy for a laptop drive. A laptop with motion and shock sensing like IBM/Lenovo do to stop the drive is a good idea for anything that will hold important info. And of course, always remember to back up!

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      • #4
        Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

        You don't have to brag about it. The rest of us want one too.

        Anyway, Canon made a bluetooth ready portable printer. Only one or two models. I think there's only one now. You can also get it with a battery. So totally cordless printing. Expensive in comparison to what you can get a home printer for now.

        HP also made one that cost more the last I checked but had no superiority. And it was even more expensive to make it bluetooth capable.

        J.C.

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        • #5
          Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

          Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
          Now how do I transfer all my files from the desktop to laptop?
          The easiest solutions are a USB hard disk or memory key. The next easiest is probably burning a CD/DVD.

          The one that I would use is Windows File sharing, but you need to get both of them networked for that. If you have a wireless router, it shouldn't be too difficult if they are both on the Internet. The exact steps depend on what version of Windows you have.

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          • #6
            Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

            Oh Boy! You guys have got me scared. My PC is about four years old, one of my laptops is two years old and this one is a year old. My across the road neighbor's hard drive crashed, I think he said a bearing went if there is such a thing in these computers, two weeks after he submitted his dissertation for his PhD. Just lucky!

            I use my computers at home, and while so far I have resisted the temptation to throw one at the cat when he claws the furniture they have not given any problems. Is it advisable to have hard drives replaced as a matter of a maintenance course?

            Also recently at a Staples store they advertised returning computers to their purchase state for free, only the programs that came on the computer when purchased would remain. My PC seems to run slowly and there is nothing on it that I couldn't replace easily. Is this offer an attempt to get me to buy another computer or is there merit in returning computers to an 'original' state?

            Thanks,
            -Tom

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            • #7
              Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

              Originally posted by Tom W View Post
              Is it advisable to have hard drives replaced as a matter of a maintenance course?
              First of all, it's not a question IF but WHEN a drive will fail. since they are mechanical devices (in most cases) there is a degree of wear on the mechanisms. Replacing a drive as a precaution if no proven issue exists would be pretty unusual.

              These are scenarios under which I replace hard drives:

              - free space is less than 25% of capacity (upgrade to a larger capacity)
              - drive begins to have problems. This can be checked in computer logs, and there are also low level software utilities which will check the health of the drive.

              I would not replace the drive just because the machine is slow, unless you know the machine is slow because the disk is failing.

              Buying a brand new drive also guarantees little data safety. I had drives fail on me within the first week after the purchase. On the other hand, I still have a drive or two which are 8 years old. Powered 24/7/365 and still kicking.

              Depending on what the drive contains, and how long it would take to reinstall and reconfigure everything back to the original state may sometimes take weeks. In such situation I would recommend Acronis True Image. It's a disk mirroring software which will make a perfect copy of the original. It will also resize partitions as required so you can copy larger to smaller or smaller to larger. Not sure what it costs but the price of these things drops as the value of your data goes up.

              I have about a dozen or so computers and a few laptops. The towers are all on RAID1and I get regular emails from the computers about the status of hardware. laptops are trickier, as few have RAID hardware, or two drive bays for that matter. I only have one laptop like that.

              When RAID1 cannot be used it all comes down to backup, backup and then some more backup. Again, the degree of backup paranoia depends on the value you place on your data. I have data from about the last 15 years and that includes some 30,000 family photographs, receipts, movies and gobs of music and what not. It would be pretty sad if I lost that so I am pretty diligent about making sure I minimize the risk of data loss.

              I also manage a municipal computer network and the same in a library. Naturally, I spare no time or expense to make sure all data is intact and available at any time, from anywhere.

              Originally posted by Tom W View Post
              Also recently at a Staples store they advertised returning computers to their purchase state for free, only the programs that came on the computer when purchased would remain. My PC seems to run slowly and there is nothing on it that I couldn't replace easily. Is this offer an attempt to get me to buy another computer or is there merit in returning computers to an 'original' state?

              Thanks,
              -Tom
              The speed of your PC may be affected by more than just disk drive. software such as viruses, spyware, or even some legit programs will eventually hog the system's resource if there is enough of them. Take for instance things such as acrobat reader. The thing is legit and necessary, but it always runs a little monitoring program to check for updates. That little proggie is not too large, but the problem is that over the years you may have accumulated tonnes of those - from digital camera software (Kodak is the worst) to printer drivers and utilities. Those little pests run in the background only to brag once in a while that there is a new version of this or that. There is a way to get them to shut up and save the resources, but this requires some registry editing and there are no 'one size fits all' recipes how to do go about it.

              Having said that, some computers do not have to be cutting edge so they may last a little longer. The ones you use as workstations for your daily work may as well be as fast as you can afford. For me the exchange time is 2 years on my primary laptop. I then downgrade the computer's role that which does not require the fastest I can afford, and the ones on the bottom of the list are disposed off.
              In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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              • #8
                Re: I'm Fully Rugged Now

                darius,

                Thank you for taking the time to compose a lengthy post in language a non-computer literate person can understand. I have not been diligent in backing up my work but I plan to change that starting today.

                I think I will carry through with the Staples restore-to-original-state offer and use my PC for tasks that require less rigirous applications.

                Thanks again.

                -Tom

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