Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

3D Printing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I found these radius gauges on Thingiverse and printed out one of each. I found I had to tweak the indicator or pointer part as it was not a good fit on the scale. The post that engages the hole in the scale was sized wrong. I don't think it was an issue with my printer or the slicer software because when I took the models into SketchUp and measured the diameter of the post it was exactly 1 mm smaller in diameter than the mating hole in the scale. If it had been some odd fraction of a mm then I would suspect the printer of the slicer software. It wouldn't have been me or SketchUp because I did not manipulate the .STL file before printing, I just loaded the file into the slicer and generated the g-code and went to print. Something I don't do that often but this time there was nothing I wanted to change and it seemed straight forward enough there was no need to check. Wrong.

    Anyway, a quick tweak and I reprinted the pointers and all is well. While not super accurate they will help measure those larger diameter arcs and circles. The radius range is up to ~18 inches or 50 cm depending on which version you are using.

    Only change I made was to include the units on the scale half of the gauge, plus fixing the diameter of the post that connects the two halves together.

    If you look close at the second photo you may be able to see that the yellow post is undersize. That's the part I corrected. When I reprinted that part it snapped together as it should and moves smoothly. There is not enough friction though to hold the setting but I think I have worked out a way to fix that so a version 3 may be coming someday. I have other things to work on right now that don't involve the 3D printer.

    Here is the original that I found on Thingiverse: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:910616

    And this is my remix in which I added the units and changed the post diameter: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5481465


    Click image for larger version

Name:	Inch and Metric Radius Gauges v2.png
Views:	124
Size:	85.2 KB
ID:	753698

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20220826_211322 (Medium).jpg
Views:	115
Size:	191.7 KB
ID:	753699

    Click image for larger version

Name:	20220826_211245 (Medium).jpg
Views:	112
Size:	399.1 KB
ID:	753700
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
    http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
    https://youtube.com/@bobd.
    ----

    Comment


    • #32
      I did a remix of the radius gauge and turned it into an angle gauge. It has a limited range but that's just because of the way its constructed.
      More an exercise to see if I could. Plenty of angle gauges on the market so no need to make a 'new' one. It was fun figuring stuff out in SketchUp.

      This will read an inside or outside angle up to a bit over 45 degrees. I may make another one that will read to 90 degrees some day. But I have no idea if or when that might happen. I was just playing around today and decided to give this a shot.

      This is direct reading to every degree. The end of the pointer has a window in it the same size as the hash marks. So when it it lined up on the mark you will see the hash mark in the window.

      You can find it here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:5484055

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Angle Gauge.png
Views:	83
Size:	28.2 KB
ID:	753705

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Angle Gauge closeup.png
Views:	80
Size:	30.0 KB
ID:	753706
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
      "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
      http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
      https://youtube.com/@bobd.
      ----

      Comment


      • Bob D.
        Bob D. commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm not happy with how this turned out so going to revise the pointer. Will probably do away with the window. If I keep it then it needs to be larger. It's too small to see precisely so I'll investigate some other options to achieve the same result.

    • #33
      Made a 1-2-3 Block today. Nowhere near as precise as a machined steel 1-2-3 block but good enough for woodworking for sure and since it's made from PLA plastic no worries about hitting it with a bit or blade it will get cut just like wood. Took just under 4 hours to print but that was at a fine resolution. I could probably knock 30 minutes or more off that time by adjusting the print settings mostly with a .30mm layer height in place of the .20mm height I printed this at.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	1-2-3_Block (Medium).jpg Views:	0 Size:	229.4 KB ID:	753738

      I made a couple V-blocks a few days ago and a clamp to go with them. These are useful for holding round objects for drilling. and other operations. Again not something you would choose for machining operations but for woodworking they are fine.

      Click image for larger version  Name:	20220811_062643.jpg Views:	0 Size:	81.6 KB ID:	753739
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
      "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
      http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
      https://youtube.com/@bobd.
      ----

      Comment


      • Bob D.
        Bob D. commented
        Editing a comment
        I revised the print settings and got this down to 3h19m by adjusting the resolution to 0.25mm and the top and bottom layers to 4 (or 1.0mm thick @ 0.25mm resolution).

    • #34
      Years ago I bought the Wife one of those magnifying lamps for her sewing room. It clamps on the side of the table top and you can use it for close up work. She loves it and uses it all the time.



      I thought after I bought it that it could be handy in the shop so I bought another one for me. I use it for soldering electronics, assembling coax connectors and other detail work. It is a very helpful tool.

      But about 5 years ago my lamp broke. Both halves of the pivot bracket where the lamp attaches to the arm cracked into two pieces. so now I had four pieces not two.



      Yesterday her lamp also broke in the exact same way that mine did. Back then I fixed mine by fashioning a replacement piece from a chunk of hardwood. But now I have a 3D Printer and this is the thing that a 3D printer in your house was meant for. It's your basic Star Trek style replicator for NLA parts. These lamps are both over 10 years old and I wrote the place I bought them from and was told the parts are NLA (no longer available).

      I probably wouldn't have bought them anyways but I wanted to know if they were available. So now I don't feel so bad making my own.

      A couple quick measurements and about an hour later I was sending the gcode to the printer. 48 minutes after that I had a pair of parts and I put her lamp back together. Everything fit perfectly, like it never happened. So I printed out another set so I can fix my lamp and get that chunk of wood out of there. Then I printed another set as a spare should either of the lamps fail again at the some point in the future. That seems like it's a possibility as I read many reports of this style lamp failing in the same manner.

      I figured someone else might need one so I put it up on Etsy and my website.
      Last edited by Bob D.; 11-12-2022, 04:00 PM.
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
      "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
      http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
      https://youtube.com/@bobd.
      ----

      Comment


      • cactusman
        cactusman commented
        Editing a comment
        Can you show us your 3 Printer.
        It seems you are having more fun with 3D printing in lieu of wood working.

        Cactus Man

    • #35
      I am having fun with the 3D printer, but I still do some woodworking. This thread is about 3D Printing so that's what I comment on here.

      I have developed a few products that I print and sell. And I am always working on creating new 'things' for various uses, some to sell and some to make repairs just as I did with these lamps. It's satisfying to be able to take on the problem which disabled this lamp because the part is NLA so you draw one for yourself and print it out then put the lamp back in service all in a couple hours.

      My printer is a Prusa i3 MK3S+. It is not a cheap one. Some say it is no better than the Prusa clones but I have had zero problems with mine and it's been almost a year. My next printer will most likely be a Prusa XL, which is a bigger and much more capable machine that will open up new areas in 3D printing for me.



      Last edited by Bob D.; 09-29-2022, 05:00 AM.
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
      "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
      http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
      https://youtube.com/@bobd.
      ----

      Comment


      • #36
        Thanks again Bob,

        As always your post are very informative. Evvery time you post a "3D" subject, I get a little impatient for my Prusa order to come. Right now we're down to five weeks. (Note to everyone else, that is only because I ordered the Prusa enclosure too, and that has a much longer lead time.)

        In the mean time I'm cleaning up the shop and preping it for the printer work space.

        Thanks again,

        CWS

        Comment


        • #37
          It will be here soon enough. I the mean time keep reading and watching. I learn new things every day about using the slicer software mostly. And you don't need the printer to get familiar with it. Just use the printer wizard and set it up for the printer you have coming, then you can start importing models and trying different settings. You won't be able to print and actually see the result, but you can learn how different settings affect print time, filament consumption, part strength, and quality.

          Get the latest version of Prusa Slicer which is 2.5.0. Join the Prusa forum is you haven't already. That's where you will learn a lot. And YT is also a great resource.
          "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
          "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

          https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
          http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
          https://youtube.com/@bobd.
          ----

          Comment


          • #38
            Well I can't believe it but I'm not complaining. I've sold two sets of those parts for the magnifying lamp so far.

            When I printed the parts to fix the second of our lamps I made one extra set that I figured I would have as a spare in case the printed parts failed some time down the road.

            As I said a couple weeks ago I put that extra set up for sale on Etsy for a couple bucks in case someone else was looking. I know when my lamp first failed years ago and I didn't have the printer the best I would do right away was make something out of wood and my thought was to eventually get a chunk of aluminum and use that. But now when the Wife's lamp failed I thought I'd give the 3D printer a try and it worked out even better than I hoped so I will stick with the printed version.

            So when that one extra set sold three days ago I was surprised and then yesterday another set sold I had to make more. So I made six more sets because who knows, maybe more people out there have a broken lamp and need the part which is not available from the manufacturer because they no longer make this lamp.

            Some day 3D printers will be as common in homes as microwaves but I think that is a ways off. The hardware has a ways to go before it is really user friendly but has advanced amazingly fast at the same time. There are now printers that can use some types of metal as a filament and create function metal parts.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
            "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
            http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
            https://youtube.com/@bobd.
            ----

            Comment


            • Bob D.
              Bob D. commented
              Editing a comment
              I've sold two more sets. Crazy! Must be a lot of those lamps out there which are aging to the point where that piece is starting to fail for everybody. Well I'm ready for them, I have more made up and ready to go. :-)
          Working...
          X