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Shower valve wrench

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  • Shower valve wrench

    How about a high quality set of sockets for shower mixing valves? The stamped steel sockets aren't worth anything. I've bought piece by piece sockets from Snap On but most of those socket cost around $20-$30. But they're worth every penny.
    Buy cheap, buy twice.

  • #2
    Re: Shower valve wrench

    the most popular wrench i use is designed for price phister stems and packing nuts. still a stamped tube design, but fits perfectly and is a little longer than a standard set of sockets.

    i use my metric deep sockets for grohe valves second most.

    it would be nice to see a high quality socket for plumbing stems. maybe with an external hex drive like on a spark plug socket.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: Shower valve wrench

      It seems like I'm always taking a hammer and beating the sockets in to have a tighter grip to the stem I'm removing.


      Does anyone use their valve sockets to remove the shank nut on fill valves? 1.25" I believe is the size.....no more fighting the cabinet or tub when they don't set the toilet 15" o.c. to the fixture.


      And does anyone know why on all flex supply lines in relation to toilet feeds, why do they always use plastic for the 7/8" nut instead of chrome brass like their faucet supplies...?

      I was wondering if the reason is that the majority of shanks are plastic in all applications these days and the plastic to plastic mesh is safer and protects the case where someone would overtighten a brass one, stripping the thread pattern out.
      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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      • #4
        Re: Shower valve wrench

        One of the valve sockets fits the shank nut? I didn't know that. I'll try to remember that next time I'm hugging a bowl.

        I'd like to see a decent tub shoe wrench that didn't shear off ever time it touched a 100 year old tub drain.

        I had a home made one of 1" steel about 20" long that had 2 slits cut in the end. It gave me great leverage with a pipe wrench without the danger of slipping and chipping the tub finish. I'm all out of white touch up enamel.

        My helper thought it was trash and tossed it

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