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  • Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

    Have 3 of your power tools, a vac, miter saw, and 1/4 sheet sander. All have failed while relatively new.

    Sander has scarcely seen any use at all and it completely fell apart in my hands today revealing that is held together with plastic toothpicks. This sander hasn't got more than 10 hours on it total. Nice, now my project is stalled while I try got get another one which hopefully is better than the last.

    You spend way too much time making them look good and not enough time making sure they work.

    Anybody who has serious work to do buy a different brand!

  • #2
    Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

    I have over 4 dozen ridgid tools, and use them every day. Had only a couple of them fail, but were fixed under warranty. I would hardly tell anyone not to buy ridgid tools. What failed on the miter saw and shop vac? My oldest ridgid tools are a shop vac and miter saw from 8 years ago, and the miter saw was great until last winter when I dropped it 3 feet onto its top side and broke the casting, hardly ridgid's fault. The failed batteries I expect from all brands and the triggers in the early drill models were inconvenient but I wasn't surprised they are susceptible in all brands. Truthfully the only tool that I love to hate is the jobmax, great tool with a weird issue with batteries and intermittently not working. I love the damn thing but am frustrated with it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

      Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
      I have over 4 dozen ridgid tools, and use them every day. Had only a couple of them fail, but were fixed under warranty. I would hardly tell anyone not to buy ridgid tools. What failed on the miter saw and shop vac? My oldest ridgid tools are a shop vac and miter saw from 8 years ago, and the miter saw was great until last winter when I dropped it 3 feet onto its top side and broke the casting, hardly ridgid's fault. The failed batteries I expect from all brands and the triggers in the early drill models were inconvenient but I wasn't surprised they are susceptible in all brands. Truthfully the only tool that I love to hate is the jobmax, great tool with a weird issue with batteries and intermittently not working. I love the damn thing but am frustrated with it.
      The mitersaw had some cheap metal shims under the table that slowly broke up into pieces. Eventually it got to where you couldn't hardly move it at all. Had a couple other issues with it as well. They did replace it though with a vastly better unit.

      Same kinda thing with the vac, except the cord was pulling out of it. Had another prob too. Also replaced with an improved unit.

      Hope it is the same with the sander as it is really a junky unit. It basically blew apart suddenly and without warning, although earlier the same day, the metal spring clip that holds the sandpaper on sheered off right in the middle. What kinds steel does that?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

        Originally posted by Vanagas View Post
        The mitersaw had some cheap metal shims under the table that slowly broke up into pieces. Eventually it got to where you couldn't hardly move it at all. Had a couple other issues with it as well. They did replace it though with a vastly better unit.

        Same kinda thing with the vac, except the cord was pulling out of it. Had another prob too. Also replaced with an improved unit.

        Hope it is the same with the sander as it is really a junky unit. It basically blew apart suddenly and without warning, although earlier the same day, the metal spring clip that holds the sandpaper on sheered off right in the middle. What kinds steel does that?
        Simple, honest answer to the last question is Chinese steel. I don't believe Ridgid directly has control over the production standards, and china is notorious for mixing metals. You end up with junk, regardless of the brand. I believe even what we think to be higher quality, better products are not made to last. It seems almost every machine, tool and electronic device breaks within a year or two. I try my best to either repair it myself with a better part, or complain but most consumers simply repurchase, They skimp on basic things like switchs and power cords. My three hundred dollar pool pump had a rocker switch made in mexico and it lasted one season! All of us are paying a price for goods made outside the USA, and made to break!
        My Echo backpack blower is sixteen year old and running strong, as is my thirty year old snowblower made in the USA! I guarantee such things purchased new today won't last half as long.

        I strongly suggest everyone get a roll of good quality power cord, male connectors and other assorted parts so you can properly repair of upgrade the high priced junk you are buying new!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

          I agree on the cheap Chinese pot metal. I know a low voltage installer that has had 3 dewalt xrp drills gear box split in two on him!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
            Simple, honest answer to the last question is Chinese steel. I don't believe Ridgid directly has control over the production standards, and china is notorious for mixing metals. You end up with junk, regardless of the brand. I believe even what we think to be higher quality, better products are not made to last. It seems almost every machine, tool and electronic device breaks within a year or two. I try my best to either repair it myself with a better part, or complain but most consumers simply repurchase, They skimp on basic things like switchs and power cords. My three hundred dollar pool pump had a rocker switch made in mexico and it lasted one season! All of us are paying a price for goods made outside the USA, and made to break!
            My Echo backpack blower is sixteen year old and running strong, as is my thirty year old snowblower made in the USA! I guarantee such things purchased new today won't last half as long.

            I strongly suggest everyone get a roll of good quality power cord, male connectors and other assorted parts so you can properly repair of upgrade the high priced junk you are buying new!
            Ridgid has complete control over the standards of products made in china.
            Ridgid wanted their tools made as cheap as possible for maximum profit like other companies do. I blame companies for selling out their own country for a few extra bucks while putting out sub standard products. We have people here with no jobs then these companies expect people who no longer have jobs buy their over priced Chinese made crap.
            Rod
            MT. Washington Sewer & Drain Cleaning
            Serving Berlin, NH and North Conway, NH areas
            http://unclognh.com
            http://mtwashingtonseweranddrainclea...m/default.aspx

            Charging less does not mean more call volume it just means you have to work harder to reach your goals.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

              Originally posted by UnClogNH View Post
              Ridgid has complete control over the standards of products made in china.
              Ridgid wanted their tools made as cheap as possible for maximum profit like other companies do. I blame companies for selling out their own country for a few extra bucks while putting out sub standard products. We have people here with no jobs then these companies expect people who no longer have jobs buy their over priced Chinese made crap.
              You could blame our legislators who were bought off to pass laws like NAFTA. North America "Fair" Trade Agreement. Yes, it's been real fair for America, we are just rolling in new trade and jobs.

              When do the republicans and democrats either realize or admit that we need businesses back here that make our consumer goods and employ our people?
              When do they stop killing the clock and work together to cut spending we can't afford including three wars? Nobody likes to pay taxes, but tax breaks to the rich have not generated jobs, our country needs that revenue and must not waste it on wars that get us nothing but dead or wounded Americans!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                I agree with the direction of this discussion....junk in--junk out!

                We the consumer are also a little to blame! Now will a home owner be willing to pay
                $199.99 for a quality drill? [as an example] -or- will he purchase the drill for $19.99?
                No need to answer!

                The professionals who use tools for a living know what brands are reliable etc.
                Hilti is a known name in the pro-tool-user market and is not really popular
                with the weekend warrior homeowner.

                Now..admit it we all abuse our tools !!!! One way or another we stress the tool.
                A 3/8 drill will not drill 1/2" holes into wood even with a turned down drill bit shaft
                to fit a 3/8" chuck. Will it drill a hole into concrete! NO! But I bet there are folks
                here that have tried it and after burning up the motor complain about a crap drill!

                Anyone remember real bumpers on cars? You know the steel/chrome ones that
                will tolerate hitting a curb???? Today your car hits something at 5mph or less and
                you have $1000.00 in repairs! Well, all products today are like that!

                Now don't even get me going on unnecessary complexity of a tool!!! for example
                sanders today utilize solid state speed control circuits built with surface mount
                technology. If you look cross eyed at the fly poop size components they will fail!
                They are extremely susceptible to static electricity! Sanders and vacuums always
                generate static electricity!

                Do the manufacturers use three wire cords and circuits providing a ground line to
                bleed off static build up and include proper RFI filtering ...NOPE
                We get a two wire cord and thankfully they are now polarized!

                Parts to repair tools are also a thing of the past. For this you can blame the marketing folks. You can then also scream at the design engineers who ensure you will never
                be able to repair the tool!

                Drill doctor comes to mind...Now I really like their products BUT..... They cleverly use
                sonic welded plastic in specific areas to prohibit access to the screws holding the parts together! Now to be fair they also do this to protect themselves from lawsuits from
                idiots who should not be allowed to use any tools!

                Cactus Man

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                  I pretty much agree with you all, but thought I was buying quality tools. The Ridgid name at one time stood for quality. I figured at least with Ridgid on the side of the tool, they would stand behind it. So far they have not. The "repair center" I took my sander to is a joke. Some guy took my sander and the paperwork home so they couldn't even give me an update other than the standard BS answer: We're waiting on parts. Now why are we ordering parts for a $47 tool? I would think they'd want close to that amount as a minimum repair charge.

                  I looked at the blow-up for this tool and counted at least 5 parts that would be needed. I wonder if the "repair center" (eg: a dump of a place called Midway Rentals) even ordered them all. The spring clip that holds down the paper inexplicably broke in half. I'll bet these bozos didn't even notice.

                  So I contacted Ridgid by email and got a "whatever we don't care" type of response. Today I called them on the phone and after wading through several layers of simple options, ended up on hold until my phone went dead.

                  Just a warning to anyone who is considering buying Ridgid tools: DON'T. Just buy something cheap you can throw away. Better to throw away inexpensive tools that this overpriced Ridgid garbage.

                  Maybe I'm taking all this wrong, and if Ridgid suddenly decides to make this right I will post that here, but don't hold your breath. Official word from repair place is 3-4 wks, maybe 30 days, depend on when we get the parts......yeah right.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                    Unfortunately, no happy ending to this story. I finally got "somebody" on the phone, but it was just some foreign guy at a call center who had no real idea what I was talking about and said he was not authorized to do anything other than call the "service center." He said Ridgid has NO service centers of their own and these independents can do whatever they please. When I asked to talk to a supervisor I was switched to another foreign guy's voice mail. I doubt if he'll give a crap either, but I left him a message.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                      ive called RIDGID a number of times and never got a foreign guy on the phone. Was it tech service or cust service?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                        Amazing! You've had three separate tools all of which failed with little use or just fell apart because of cheap parts and totally lousey service and foreigners on the phone that you can't understand or blew you off or you held so long that your phone battery died. (Maybe your phone gets the same cheap parts or care that your tools do?)

                        Well, I do have to admit that my 1/4-sheet Ridgid Sander also blew it's guts... but only after about four years of use. Got it fixed though with not so much as a blink. The service guy even delivered it back to me, because he felt bad about the four weeks that it took to get the parts. That was three years ago and the things works better than new.

                        I also have almost two dozen other Ridgid tools including two heavily used shop vacs, the 10"miter saw, sanders, drills, etc. All of them have worked flawlessly and the sanders and vacs especially since the were bought back in 2003/4 with the introduction. All are (not the vacs of course, as they don't qualify) registered into the LLSA system, without problem.

                        Service-wise? Well, I've only had to have two tools serviced. The pre-mentioned 1/4-sheet and a 14.4 drill with an off-centered chuck. No questions, and no hassles. Of course, I don't hang my hat and my projects on dependance to just have one tool without a back-up either. So, I don't consider a four week wait for a part to be a disaster. (I've found far more delay and poor service from my American-made Ford dealer!)

                        I've had several contacts and nice conversation with Ridgid Customer and Technical Service. I have never gotten anyone that wasn't a local right there in Anderson, SC. Maybe it was that "southern accent"... but hey, I'm used to that. They have always been courteous, and for the most part knowledgeable.

                        Personally, my experience with Ridgid and Ryobi tools and TTI in general has always been pleasant. It's not always perfect, but then I understand some of the challenges in the parts and service business. Service centers can be hassle though, but I haven't had that experience. But I understand that these are independant operations and no different than any other service business, anywhere! Some are good and some are bad and either had both good and bad individuals.... usually all guys like us.."Americans". Patience, courtesy, and even "civility" are not common traits with all of us.

                        So, sorry you're having a problem. Buy another brand and hopefully you'll be happier... but I don't think any other brand will provide you warranty service after four years, even if your tool has been just sitting on the shelf.

                        Good luck,

                        CWS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                          I look at Ridgid tools like I look at Dodge trucks... they are good vehicles with the occassional hick-up, but as long as you find one of the few good service centers, its easy, and almost painless and you are on your way with a innovative tool. But, as like Dodge, there are alot of shotty service centers, and they can make or break ones image of a product. I had almost written off Dodge due to horrible issues with one of their trucks... well finally I got sick of the dealership and moved on to another just for the hell of it. Well, it was the LAST time I had it serviced, ran better than it did new, I learned something, that its not always the "tool" thats at fault as much as the service center or user in most cases.

                          I too have been on the line with customer service, and other than a "thick Ohio accent" (if there is a thing) I never got someone outside the US, and this was with in the last 6 months.

                          Sorry you have had issues, but from my experiance, I haven't had one issue with getting items fixed (other than the occassional part on back order).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                            I used to own an engine machine shop. We used a drill motors for all sorts of operations. The newer tools worked ok, but the plastic and general cost-cutting designs led us to treat them as throwaways. On the other hand, the older (60s and 70s) US made tools never died. Just brushes, and even those lasted for many years. The oil, solvents and general abuse would eventually cause the power cords to crack and deteriorate. We would change out the cords and put the tools back to work. The same conditions destroy the plastic and ridiculous overmolded rubberized grips on the new glitzy tools. A few of those old dogs live in my garage now. They're still the go-to corded tools. And I have yet to see a chuck on a new tool that is in the same league as a well-worn USA made chuck from the 60s or 70s.

                            Same is true for bits of all types. More and more of the bits are Chinese, and I think for the most part they stink. Some of the imported router bits aren't too bad in terms of holding an edge, but the ball bearings are total crap even if you keep them oiled. Pretty sad when you pick up a Milwaukee or P-C router or drill bit an it says "Made in China". To me that means, "better buy a couple". Is it really cheaper? As I see it, not if you use your stuff a lot.

                            I appreciate the service center comments... but the problem is, I don't want to have to stop my job or project and deal with it. Time is money and it costs a lot to have a job stopped while you have to deal with taking a tool back to a service center. Unless it's just a hobby and you're in no rush to get a job done, for most tools it's often cheaper to just get another one and finish the job.
                            Last edited by Andy_M; 04-30-2011, 01:38 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Maybe Make a Quality Power Tool?

                              Originally posted by Andy_M View Post
                              I used to own an engine machine shop. We used a drill motors for all sorts of operations. The newer tools worked ok, but the plastic and general cost-cutting designs led us to treat them as throwaways. On the other hand, the older (60s and 70s) US made tools never died. Just brushes, and even those lasted for many years. The oil, solvents and general abuse would eventually cause the power cords and strain reliefs to crack and deteriorate. We would change the cords and put the tools back to work. A few of those live in my garage now. They're still the go-to corded tools. The same conditions destroy the plastic and ridiculous overmolded rubberized grips on the new glitzy tools. And I have yet to see a chuck on a new tool that is in the same league as a well-worn USA made chuck from the 60s or 70s.

                              Same is true for bits of all types. More and more of the bits are Chinese, and I think for the most part they stink. Some of the imported router bits aren't too bad in terms of holding an edge, but the ball bearings are total crap even if you keep them oiled. Pretty sad when you pick up a Milwaukee or P-C router or drill bit an it says "Made in China". To me that means, "better buy a couple".
                              So true. Thanks.

                              I've gotten to the point it pisses me off for them to try and market a drills improvements when I know there have been no improvements. Only cost cutting to increase profits at the first sale and to create turnover in future sales.

                              All the U.S.'s children learned well at college in economics & business....


                              J.C.

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