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  • #16
    So there is a way to bypass this safety device? That alone should STOP any attempt at mandate to require the technology on all saws. That makes the device no better than a blade gaurd that people CHOOSE to use or not. As it stands now it takes about a year to get a saw stop after ordering. The manufacturer can't meet production demands. I want to know what proof they have that this system will actually work on a human finger.
    info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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    • #17
      Not that this observation will evoke a lot of sympathy, but . . .

      Every time a person who happens to be a lawyer -- and who most likely earns his living doing plaintiff's personal injury litigation on a contingent fee basis -- files a stupid lawsuit or makes a stupid statement in the media, there is a reflexive outpouring of disdain for "lawyers" or "trial lawyers."

      Please note that not all lawyers, and not all trial lawyers, are plaintiff's personal injury lawyers. In fact, that sub-set of the profession is a distinct minority. There are some (indeed, more than a few) perfectly level-headed and responsible folks out there who also happen to be lawyers. So how about we get a bit more discriminating when we load the bus for the ride over the cliff?

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      • #18
        I'm all for a device that will make things safer but I have my doubts about this one. They always show them just touching the weiner to the blade, anyone who has seen or been in a saw accident knows that it is not a gentle brush with the blade but a full on O-SH** the blade just grabbed my wood and now my fingers are flying through the blade with it. From their site the saw stop will stop a blade spinning at 4000 rpm in 5 millisec. lets say we have an 80 tooth blade, this will stop the saw in 26 teeth, how much damage can 26 carbide teeth do? BTW that is about 10 inches of travel, plenty to do major damage to a finger IMO

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RGad:
          Not that this observation will evoke a lot of sympathy, but . . .

          Every time a person who happens to be a lawyer -- and who most likely earns his living doing plaintiff's personal injury litigation on a contingent fee basis -- files a stupid lawsuit or makes a stupid statement in the media, there is a reflexive outpouring of disdain for "lawyers" or "trial lawyers."

          Please note that not all lawyers, and not all trial lawyers, are plaintiff's personal injury lawyers. In fact, that sub-set of the profession is a distinct minority. There are some (indeed, more than a few) perfectly level-headed and responsible folks out there who also happen to be lawyers. So how about we get a bit more discriminating when we load the bus for the ride over the cliff?
          Ok, I will retract that statement about all lawyers and say just 99.99999999 in a bus going over a cliff. I am just kidding of course and really don't mean it.
          I admit when I read about them doing the federal mandate, it burned my shorts and I generally have a LOOOOOOONNNNNGGGGG fuse before I get angry..I am the most passive person you'll ever meet.
          I say after they get this thing down to a science and instead of forcing the product on folks-make it where it will fit all makes of saws with minimal alteration. Sell the kits to service centers only and have them do the installation for the customer. Require that all service centers go through a training program and get certified.
          I know...what about the legalities of having the service center performing the install and they get sued when the product doesn't work and someone really looses a finger?
          Nothing is ever just simple anymore for all the positive things about SawStop there can be found one million negatives.

          And I will end on this thought-I wonder when the first user of "the device" will actually push his finger into the blade to test it or just for fun and gets a small nick on their finger or looses a finger and they go out and hire Johnny Cochran to sue the pants off the "The Device Designer" and power tool manufacturer. What will happen next?

          [ 12-30-2004, 12:07 PM: Message edited by: swhalen ]

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          • #20
            The best lawyers are the ones going over a cliff in a bus....
            This is a waste of resources. Better to teach them Chinese and send them over. This is one "technology" I would gladly share.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RGad:
              Not that this observation will evoke a lot of sympathy, but . . .

              Every time a person who happens to be a lawyer -- and who most likely earns his living doing plaintiff's personal injury litigation on a contingent fee basis -- files a stupid lawsuit or makes a stupid statement in the media, there is a reflexive outpouring of disdain for "lawyers" or "trial lawyers."

              Please note that not all lawyers, and not all trial lawyers, are plaintiff's personal injury lawyers. In fact, that sub-set of the profession is a distinct minority. There are some (indeed, more than a few) perfectly level-headed and responsible folks out there who also happen to be lawyers. So how about we get a bit more discriminating when we load the bus for the ride over the cliff?
              I agree with you. I know several lawyers who are really decent family people with alot of integrity who work hard doing house closings, personal wills, settling estates, insurance work, divorces, etc. None are shysters, and none are affluent.

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              • #22
                It's My understanding that the Saw Blade is actually welded to the aluminum stopping cartridge within 1/5000 sec. as it drops below the table, therefore ruining them both upon activation. See "A Safer Tablesaw Finally Arrives" FINE WOODWORKING TOOLS & SHOPS Winter 2004/2005 Page 66. Or www.sawstop.com The saw does seem way overpriced $2500.00 plus fence, but how much is a finger or two worth I suppose?? Besides IF you never PLAN on cutting your finger off then you won't have to replace it! "Bookum Danno"

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