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  • Saw stop Technology

    I was reading the The annual "Tools & Shops" Fine Woodworking Magazine # 174 , and in it was a two page article about the New Saw Stop Technology. Dont take this wrong but any manufactuer is crazy not to jump on this opportunity to incorprate this technology in there woodworking machines. Soo ridgid take note of this and consider adopting this Saw Stop in any upcoming new Desighs of your Machines, I would love to see it in perhaps a Hybrid Tablesaw or New Bandsaw carring the Ridgid name. I can promise you that it would be hard to keep your saws in stock at the BOB if they had the Saw Stop on them. If any one else is interested in Checking this stuff out visit Saw Stop Technology

  • #2
    Pretty cool technology. i just read about it too. That horrible sound the saw makes when the baldes retract or lock up is awful. I wonder how long before arbors, blades, and parts start breaking apart due to the sudden jolt of the quick stoppage.
    Poor wieners were beinig picked on in those demos. They should get one of the saw inventors to put their real finger up to the blade for the ultimate test..lol
    I wonder if they will make add-on kits for exisiting saws on the market.

    [ 12-24-2004, 04:00 PM: Message edited by: swhalen ]

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    • #3
      That horrible sound the saw makes when the baldes retract or lock up is awful. I wonder how long before arbors, blades, and parts start breaking apart due to the sudden jolt of the quick stoppage.
      It may not be good for the saw and its parts but hopefully you won't be running your fingers through the saw alot, in that case you may want to consider a new hobby, but there is a lot of insurance knowing if you ever have a slip up that that feature is there. I did wonder what kind of wear and tear this mechanism can do to the motor but, if im not mistaken its shuts the motor down as well as stop the blade and drop it below the table.

      Just think of how useful this would be in the case of a shop class or busness where these saw are used everyday and down time from a cut finger would kill your business!! So us the Consumers really need to push these types of saftey features so that a manfacturers will adopt them!!

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      • #4
        Orange

        I agree, safety should be #1 priority. However, on that note it should not be so much of a priority that it tears up your machine. A happy medium and common sense is what should dictate your activity.

        I have been in the military for 14 years....worked around aircraft for most of that time. I entered the military in 1990 which was about the time that the frivilous lawsuits seemed to peak and warning lables seemed to become ridiculous. Well anyone who has ever served in the military knows that whatever the standard the civilian world is held to, the military is held to a higher level. So it got to the point early on that it just became ridiculous. Here I was, a new E-4 New to working on airplanes when all these new regulations began to come out. and the military labeling on the containers was three times as bad as the civilian. I had an old E-6 I worked for....he thought it was ridiculous the level it went to. He said "it is survival of the smartest! if someone wants to drink a gallon of paint thinner, let them, the smart will live and the stupid will die"

        in some cases he was right!

        in the case you speak of, in my opinion, if the sudden stop is going to cause the tool to burn up, and you are stupid enough to have your fingers where they dont belong, that is your problem. I for one do not want my table saw motor to die because a friend of mine comes over to use it and insists on cutting his work himself, while letting his fingers go where they don't belong!

        Just my two cents

        might seem selfish, but that table saw cost me 600 bucks and i know where to keep my fingers!


        happy holidays
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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        • #5
          I have read and looked over the SawStop tech and it may be a good thing. One of the members over at the Woodnet site just got one and time will tell how well it really works. Space, I have to disagree with your statement about a friend using your saw and getting hurt. When a friend shows up at my shop needing something cut or drilled or whatever, I am more than happy to do it for them. I will not allow anyone without more experience then me to operate any of my equipment. I would really feal bad if someong got hurt on my tools.
          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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          • #6
            The attorney who invented it will not license it to other manufactureres unless they are also willing to accept liability for its design. So, no one else is going to make it. It is a nice saw, but it is about$1000 overpriced for its features.
            www.TheWoodCellar.com

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            • #7
              Papadan

              I may have misworded what i meant. I would feel horrible if someone came over and hurt themselves in my shop. Safety is my number one priority in my shop! period. I have a one year old son who has not a clue yet, and i still make it a habit to pull and lock all my switch locks and put the key out of reach. Habit patterns. That is where safety comes from. My one year old has the little tykes workshop complete with the power saw, table saw, etc. I make it fun but keep his hands away from the blades, etc. its a game now so here in a few years when i can buy him the Home depot hand tool set from toys r us he will have developed some respect for the tools, etc.

              My point was and i may be wrong in my way of thinking, but if someone needs a table saw to shut off when it hit's their fingers they probably don't need to have a table saw. Now i mean no disrespect to anyone who has had a table saw accident.

              or any other kind of power tool accident for that matter. I have been bitten before, believe it or not by a biscuit jointer, and i was doing everything right. or so i thought. apparently not as i got bit. yes the tool malfunctioned, but my hand was still in the wrong place. had it been in the right place, even with the malfunction i would not have been cut.

              in my opinion, the kind of technology that is being discussed here is going to give people a false sense of security, and when it does not work as it should, the lawsuits will fly.

              Being from the midwest, i kind of compare it to that first real snowfall of the year. the one where those clowns in their four wheel drive's think they are invinvible, end up in the ditch, thinking they have a security blanket putting too much faith into a system that they should not need unless they get stuck!

              A bit of a stretch, but an appropriate analogy, in my mind. I appreciate you calling me out on that statement papa, and by the way I sure do appreciate the advice on the mitre saw. I will let you know what i find when i tear it down!

              Actually on that note, the first fence i replaced, yes it is a fixed item, but nothing i did would square it to the blade. the original fence that came on the saw was warped. The second one did not need to be replaced. I cant wait to get her torn down, cleaned up and back running as she should.

              The one flaw i did find on this particular saw, and again forgive the terminology because i am sure i am jazzed up, is that plastic piece that fits over the back of the spring with the single phillips head screw that traps the saw dust. prevents the saw from having full motion up and down. I actually have removed this.

              I also made one huge mistake on this particular saw. As you may have caught, the debate a few weeks/months back regarding the use of the guard on the table saw. Well I personally have never installed mine. There are mixed opinions on this issue and i am not trying to relive the thread. My stupidity came in the form of removing the guard from my mitre saw. Dumbest thing i have ever done. Yeah i get a better view of my cut line.....but this is a serious comprimise to safety. My hand has come a little to close to comfort to that blade since i pulled this bonehead move. And the worst part of it, is that i lost the parts to reinstall it, so i had to order new ones. Not real expensive but lesson learned. I almost got bit a few times on this thing before i put it away until it can be put back together properly.

              Well i have gotten way off subject here. Sorry.

              Papadan, thanks for calling me out on this post. the point i was trying to make came out wrong!

              Hope everyone had a great Holiday

              Ed
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rafael:
                The attorney who invented it will not license it to other manufactureres unless they are also willing to accept liability for its design. So, no one else is going to make it. It is a nice saw, but it is about$1000 overpriced for its features.
                Steve Gass from Saw Stop has also applied for a federal mandate that all saws be forced to incorporate his technology. As much as I was entrigued by this new technology, that greedy self-serving manuver pissed off hoards of would-be supporters....me included. It looks like a nice saw, but I want nothing to do with a company who's willing to go those lengths to force themselves on us. If the gadget is good, it will survive on it's own.

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                • #9
                  hewood,
                  Gass will not stop, lawschools teach lawyers to do whatever it takes to do what they want to do.
                  He will probably sue other manufacturers saying that they make an inherently unsafe product because it doesn't have his technology.
                  Remember, gun makers are being sued because guns kill. Shysters will stop at nothing.
                  www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                  • #10
                    Seems like it would preclude the use of any kind of blade coating (would block conductivity path at the arbor). How about cutting aluminum, acrylic or foam. Will the system going to detect the difference?

                    This looks to be a repeat of the arc-trip breaker debacle to me - insurance industry lobbying to put costly technology into codes without fully understanding the implications and limitations or even the abilty to produce the product reliably.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hewood:
                      </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Rafael:
                      The attorney who invented it will not license it to other manufactureres unless they are also willing to accept liability for its design. So, no one else is going to make it. It is a nice saw, but it is about$1000 overpriced for its features.
                      Steve Gass from Saw Stop has also applied for a federal mandate that all saws be forced to incorporate his technology. As much as I was entrigued by this new technology, that greedy self-serving manuver pissed off hoards of would-be supporters....me included. It looks like a nice saw, but I want nothing to do with a company who's willing to go those lengths to force themselves on us. If the gadget is good, it will survive on it's own. </font>[/QUOTE]you mean to tell us that dipsh!t is going to try to force the SawStop technology on all manufacturers???!!!! Driving up prices from the device plus the cost of tool manufacturer's legal expenses around this coming debacle which will ultimately passed on to the common woodworker.
                      F**k that noise. I want nothing to do with this SawSlop BS then.
                      I'll be damned if you ever see David Marks with one of those installed on his vintage shop saws.

                      [ 12-26-2004, 06:31 PM: Message edited by: swhalen ]

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                      • #12
                        I think your anger has hit the nail on the head. Lawyers can often be poor salesmen, this one is angering alot of people to the point they would never buy anything from his company. If he was smart he would not have tried to get the government involved, and instead would build and sell a line of sawstops from contractor style on up at competitive prices.
                        www.TheWoodCellar.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Rafael:
                          I think your anger has hit the nail on the head. Lawyers can often be poor salesmen, this one is angering alot of people to the point they would never buy anything from his company. If he was smart he would not have tried to get the government involved, and instead would build and sell a line of sawstops from contractor style on up at competitive prices.
                          The best lawyers are the ones going over a cliff in a bus....you know that old joke.
                          Maybe someone will put his weiner up on a board and test his pos sawslop crap...Sorry this just really makes me angry that in a world with all going on, this turd wants to be EVEN richer than he probably alrady is...
                          OK I have said enough..I will keep my peace now.

                          [ 12-26-2004, 06:31 PM: Message edited by: swhalen ]

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                          • #14
                            Several months ago there was alot of heated discussion over this topic from both proponents and opponents. When put to a survey vote, over 90% thought that Gass should not have gone with the mandate route. At least now he has some idea what type of support he has lost from woodworkers! Most agree it's cool technology, but bad antics.

                            [ 12-27-2004, 07:49 AM: Message edited by: hewood ]

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                            • #15
                              wow i didnt know how much push these guys have behind it, it does sound like a awesome saftey device but if he would take the time to wait and let the product sell it self he would be rolling in the dough

                              Some one asked about cutting alluminum and metals there is a shut off lock on the stopping cartridge that will alow you to cut these types of materials

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