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    I'm new to the discussion board but have been browsing for a while. I've seen some interesting posts on various modifications and interesting uses for wet/dry vacs.

    I was just curious what other modifications or uses anyone has found particularly beneficial.

    Thanks.
    Ben

  • #2
    Ben,

    Welcome to the forum. I am fairly new here myself. There seems to be a lot of knowledgeable people here that are quite willing to share their experiences in a pleasant manner.

    Regarding your question about shop vac "other" uses; I was hoping to see what some of the responses would be, but apparently the subject has not been noticed. So, let me add a couple of my own thoughts.

    First, shop vacs do two things... they suck up dust and other debris and they blow filtered air with some force. The filtering of course depends on the quality of the filter and how clean you keep the vac. That said, it is an indispensable tool if you are going to make any kind of a mess (sawdust, woodchips, spills, remodeling debris, etc., etc., etc.. Heck, I've even used my older shop vac to suck out a few clogged kitchen drains (definitely need a wet vac for that, and then clean it immediatly).

    I recently purchased the little "Stinger" vac (available at HD for about $26) which is also made by Ridgid. It is only 2 gallons, but has enough power to clean up most small messes, wet or dry. The filters for my old Craftsman vac are getting expensive and they don't filter out drywall dust; and, the thing is too large to carry up too many stairs. The little "Stinger" is about perfect for moving from room to room as I scrape, sand, and cut during are recent remodeling. Using a longer hose, it works perfectly with my random orbit sander and escaping dust is minimal. Also, a quick change of the hose from one end to the other and I have a fairly decent blower.

    Vacuums are available in a wide range of capacities and I would suggest that one do their shopping wisely. If you are going to do home maintenance, remodeling, or any kind of debris producing hobby, a shop vac is great. But, if you have a good shop area and do a lot of woodworking, you might want to seriously consider adding a dedicated dust collection system. They move a lot more air and are generally quieter. If sized properly, a dust collector will do a much better job of keeping the shop dust to a minimum and the air much more breathable. Also note, that whether you are working in your shop, sanding that old woodwork, or tearing out a wall, wear a good dust mask!

    Hope this helps,

    CWS

    [ 06-16-2004, 01:41 AM: Message edited by: CWSmith ]

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    • #3
      In the need arises you can use it to get the last inch or so of water out of an above ground pool so you can replace the liner, remove the filter and have at it, works like a charm

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      • #4
        Thank you for your responses so far. Good point about the smaller stinger. I recently purchased the new 4 gal, 5 hp RIDGID model from Depot. It works very well and is portable...I wish I had known about wet / dry vacs before I rebuilt my two story deck...it would have made clean up a lot easier.

        One thing I have noticed is that cleaning the floor and carpet is that the suction often is so powerful that it causes the floor nozzle to stick to the floor and makes cleaning a bit challenging. Does anyone have a suggestion of an accessory that may work to fix this problem?

        Thanks.
        Ben

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        • #5
          Ben,

          Try using the attachment from a regular floor vacuum on carpet. Carpet and floor attachments usually have some clearance designed into the attachment so that a "locking" vacuum isn't created. While a shop vac is good for many things, I personally wouldn't use it to regularly clean carpet. Not that it won't work, but that the rotating brush/beater bar on an "upright" carpet vacuum does a better job of brushing or beating dust, hair, and daily household debris out of the carpet fibers.

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          • #6
            there is a great accessory for shop vacs that solves the 'sticking' problem associated with the high vacuum created by a shop vac. Go to Sears (who has marketed them for over 20 years) or HD and look in the shop vac display where the extension hoses and attachments are. Look for an accessory piece that has a handle and a collar that can be rotated to reveal an opening that will allow you to relieve the suction at the working end.

            Ridigd calls it their "VT2505 Hose Grip" (shown below)


            It is identical to the Craftsman one and probably made by the same manufacturer. I've had my Craftsman model since 1985 and it's still in great shape. For ~`$10 you can't go wrong.

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            • #7
              CWS thanks for the tip on the carpet tools. I will have to see if there is a connector than will reduce the hose size connection to fit a standard vacuum.

              The only time I really clean the carpets are after my kids spill food / drink on the floor. It is easier to grab the 4 gallon portable wet / dry vac than the upright. It also is quicker about picking it up. I've also used it to clean up after a spill. I douse the area with water then suck it up with my vac. Works well...no stain. With three toddlers in the house, spills are inevitable.

              Bob - Thanks for the tip on the hose grip. It looks like a good tool. Great way to control the suction strength. I'll have to check it out.

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