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Corded Power pack for Cordless tools

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  • Corded Power pack for Cordless tools

    I searched for "Battery" before I started this and didn’t get any good hits. The closest I saw was this post on "corded or cordless": http://www.ridgidforum.com/cgi-bin/u...;f=17;t=000023

    I’m not a contractor, I’m an occasional weekend worker around the house. I’m the perfect “Rayobi” guy (cheap tools, cheap price, will last my lifetime), but I still like good quality tools and have been impressed with Rigid. I own several tools from them now.

    Since I don’t want / don’t have the space / can’t afford two of every tool, I bought their 18v cordless pack (drill, saw, reciprocating sawzall tool, and light), and have other corded tools (jigsaw, angle grinder). The problem I have is even with my light duty, the batteries run down too much. Again, I’m not running them like a contractor, but once every two or three months, I dig into a little tougher job where I need a good 60 minutes of power. Batteries don’t supply that.

    Solution: Make an 18v adapter I can plug in to my battery-tools. The transformer would be on the plug end, and a small, light adapter would slide onto the tool. Maybe 5 feet of cord.

    Let me know what you think; below is what I sent to Rigid. The way to contact their marketing is here:
    http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Contact-Us/index.htm
    -------------------------
    Dear Rigid,

    I own many Rigid hand tools; my only complaint is with your battery powered tools They are nice, but on a longer day where I'm doing more work than rest, the batteries run down. Two is not enough to swap and keep continuously working. This happens even with new batteries. I am going to buy a third to try to help this problem.

    It's especially annoying when they go into deep cycle recharge because I ran them too low. ("Too low" is described as the extremely hard to find time that full power drops a tiny bit.) This causes me to stop for up to an hour or two due to a low battery--not what you want to tell the boss (or wife). The solution of using a battery for 5 or 10 minutes and charging it is not practical. And, I've run them dry in 5 minutes of sawzall use so even that isn't a good solution.

    This is more common with the battery powered Sawzall-type tool, but happens with heavy drilling as well.

    Suggestion: Make a slide-in pack that supplies power. Transformer plugs into the wall, small slide-in pack slides into the tool battery location.

    Constant, full voltage/amerage power, and it lasts as long as the electric company. When I need to get farther away or work in a variety of locations, I'll swap to the battery. Extended jobs in one spot: I'll use the power cord.

    If I'm using batteries and have one charging while the other one dies....do I stop working? No! Plug in the power pack. This also saves me from buying two sets of tools.

    I'm amazed that no tool company has done this so far. Be the first and grab the market.

    Edit: Letter edited for more better english.

    [ 06-12-2005, 08:16 AM: Message edited by: Wayne_S ]

  • #2
    Skill actually made what you have described a few years back. It fit their 14.4 volt drill, the transformer was in the shape of a battery pack, and the cord came out of it. I don't know if they still hold a patent or not.

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    • #3
      I BELIEVE THAT DEWALT ALSO HAD A SYSTEM FOR THEIR 24 VOLT TOOLS TOO. PROBLEM IS THAT THEIR 24 VOLT TOOLS WERE DISCONTINUED AND THE 24 VOLT POWER PACK WAS MORE EXPENSIVE THAN BUYING A CORDED TOOL OF THE SAME QUALITY. ALSO THE TRANSFORMER WAS QUITE HEAVY TO SUPPLY THE AMPRAGE NEEDED TO REPLACE THE BATTERY.

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      • #4
        Has anyone tried coring out an old battery and hooking up DC to it?

        You can get rated volts/amps of the battery, but I didn't know if the tools were rated to handle constant DC.

        By that I mean does the tool's life factor in the additional cooling-off period provided by battery run-down, or can I run them pretty much constantly without worry of overheating / short / dying an early death / violating a warrantee.

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        • #5
          This is a good idea, and should be cheap to produce... The tools duty cycle doesnt factor in cool off time i wouldnt think, since they provide 2 batteries and a gang charger, enough batterys would equal 100 percent duty cycle..

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          • #6
            Does Ridgid every look at these and reply? I poked at a few threads and didn't see anything that indicated they saw any of these.

            Same with their website submission; no reply at all.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Wayne_S:
              Does Ridgid every look at these and reply?
              Nope [img]tongue.gif[/img]
              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #8
                I am very new here but if I had to plug a cord into my cordless tool, it would defeat the whole idea of it being cordless. You might as well get out the extension and use a corded tool.

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                • #9
                  Leakman,

                  What the original poster infered was that he wanted both cordlessw and corded capability with one tool.

                  My personal thoughts about a home use tool was that there is usually a lot of power outlets available and that a corded tool would be the first purchase rather than the second. Corded tools are usually cheaper and stronger than than cordless and, when there is ample and steady power available, the best tool to use anyway.
                  Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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                  • #10
                    You said the key phrase: Home.
                    I'm not always at home with my tools. I'm on the trail, or in the country/woods/desert. I don't want to drag a generator for a sawzall and a cordless drill/screwdriver so I go cordless. On a rare occasion, I use a cheap inverter if I need a recharge.

                    When I am home, they see more active use at my house or friends. I don't want to haul out an extension cord every time I want to drill a quick hole or turn a screw. Usually batteries are fine. (I do have corded Ridgid tools, like an angle grinder and jobsaw).

                    But occasionally, on some sustained jobs, batteries just don't do. I don't want to buy a 2nd set of tools for something I do a couple times a year. Likewise, I don't want to have to haul a big inverter and extension cords with me when I leave home (and extra gas for the engine)

                    Yes, I know--buy a second set of tools. I'm not tearing the current set up, so it's not worth it. For the occasional sustained use, a corded pack would be great, and a huge selling point (that would quickly be copied).

                    I'll probably clean out a battery (carefully) and go from there.

                    [ 08-17-2005, 07:28 AM: Message edited by: Wayne_S ]

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