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  • largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

    A guiness book of world records is happening this weekend in downtown los angeles. 2100 deliveries from 208 concrete trucks are pouring the foundation for a73 story, 1100 foot tall building. There are 19 pumper crane trucks involed. The pour will take 20 hours.

    7 million pounds of rebar and another 84 million pounds of concrete to pour the foundation.

    Plenty of links to read about, ill post just 1.

    New Concrete Pour World Record at Wilshire Grand | NBC Southern California

    Rick.
    phoebe it is

  • #2
    Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

    I heard about it on the radio. Pretty interesting.

    I thought you couldn't pour this volume of concrete this quickly. Something about cure rates & exothermic reaction etc. etc.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

      How does this compare to the 3 million plus cubic yards poured for the Hover Dam? That took two years if I'm correct. Parts of the Dam still curing?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

        Just saw pictures on fox 6 news in milwaukee,,', It will be the tallest building west of the mississippi

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

          Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
          How does this compare to the 3 million plus cubic yards poured for the Hover Dam? That took two years if I'm correct. Parts of the Dam still curing?
          84 million lbs. of concrete is approximately 21,000 yards ( a yard of concrete weighs about 4,050 lbs.).

          There are many things to consider when pouring large volumes of concrete, but with todays admixtures it is easier to do.

          Rick if you have to work near there in the next 3 months it's going to be a lot warmer there then anywhere else in the city.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

            I expected to see a thousand illegals with hoes, mud boxes and buckets.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

              This thread made me think of another project in the Southwest.
              Concrete


              Columns of Hoover Dam being filled with concrete, February 1934 (looking upstream from the Nevada rim)


              The first concrete was poured into the dam on June 6, 1933, 18 months ahead of schedule.[59] Since concrete heats and contracts as it cures, the potential for uneven cooling and contraction of the concrete posed a serious problem. Bureau of Reclamation engineers calculated that if the dam was built in a single continuous pour, the concrete would take 125 years to cool and the resulting stresses would cause the dam to crack and crumble. Instead, the ground where the dam was to rise was marked with rectangles, and concrete blocks in columns were poured, some as large as 50 feet (15 m) square and 5 feet (1.5 m) high.[60] Each five-foot form contained a series of 1 inch (25 mm) steel pipes through which first cool river water, then ice-cold water from a refrigeration plant was run. Once an individual block had cured and had stopped contracting, the pipes were filled with grout. Grout was also used to fill the hairline spaces between columns, which were grooved to increase the strength of the joins.[61]
              The concrete was delivered in huge steel buckets 7 feet (2.1 m) high and almost 7 feet (2.1 m) in diameter—Crowe was awarded two patents for their design. These buckets, which weighed 20 short tons (18 t) when full, were filled at two massive concrete plants on the Nevada side, and were delivered to the site in special railcars. The buckets were then suspended from aerial cableways, which were used to deliver the bucket to a specific column. As the required grade of aggregate in the concrete differed depending on placement in the dam (from pea-sized gravel to 9 inch (230 mm) stones), it was vital that the bucket be maneuvered to the proper column. Once the bottom of the bucket opened up, disgorging 8 cubic yards (6.1 m3) of concrete, a team of men worked it throughout the form. Although there are myths that men were caught in the pour and are entombed in the dam to this day, each bucket only deepened the concrete in a form by an inch, and Six Companies engineers would not have permitted a flaw caused by the presence of a human body.[62]
              A total of 3,250,000 cubic yards (2,480,000 m3) of concrete was used in the dam before concrete pouring ceased on May 29, 1935. In addition, 1,110,000 cubic yards (850,000 m3) were used in the power plant and other works. More than 582 miles (937 km) of cooling pipes were placed within the concrete. Overall, there is enough concrete in the dam to pave a two-lane highway from San Francisco to New York.[47] Concrete cores were removed from the dam for testing in 1995; they showed that "Hoover Dam's concrete has continued to slowly gain strength" and the dam is composed of a "durable concrete having a compressive strength exceeding the range typically found in normal mass concrete".[63] Hoover Dam concrete is not subject to alkali–silica reaction (ASR) as the Hoover Dam builders happened to use nonreactive aggregate, unlike that at downstream Parker Dam, where ASR has caused measurable deterioration.[63]

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
                This thread made me think of another project in the Southwest.
                Concrete


                Columns of Hoover Dam being filled with concrete, February 1934 (looking upstream from the Nevada rim)


                The first concrete was poured into the dam on June 6, 1933, 18 months ahead of schedule.[59] Since concrete heats and contracts as it cures, the potential for uneven cooling and contraction of the concrete posed a serious problem. Bureau of Reclamation engineers calculated that if the dam was built in a single continuous pour, the concrete would take 125 years to cool and the resulting stresses would cause the dam to crack and crumble. Instead, the ground where the dam was to rise was marked with rectangles, and concrete blocks in columns were poured, some as large as 50 feet (15 m) square and 5 feet (1.5 m) high.[60] Each five-foot form contained a series of 1 inch (25 mm) steel pipes through which first cool river water, then ice-cold water from a refrigeration plant was run. Once an individual block had cured and had stopped contracting, the pipes were filled with grout. Grout was also used to fill the hairline spaces between columns, which were grooved to increase the strength of the joins.[61]
                The concrete was delivered in huge steel buckets 7 feet (2.1 m) high and almost 7 feet (2.1 m) in diameter—Crowe was awarded two patents for their design. These buckets, which weighed 20 short tons (18 t) when full, were filled at two massive concrete plants on the Nevada side, and were delivered to the site in special railcars. The buckets were then suspended from aerial cableways, which were used to deliver the bucket to a specific column. As the required grade of aggregate in the concrete differed depending on placement in the dam (from pea-sized gravel to 9 inch (230 mm) stones), it was vital that the bucket be maneuvered to the proper column. Once the bottom of the bucket opened up, disgorging 8 cubic yards (6.1 m3) of concrete, a team of men worked it throughout the form. Although there are myths that men were caught in the pour and are entombed in the dam to this day, each bucket only deepened the concrete in a form by an inch, and Six Companies engineers would not have permitted a flaw caused by the presence of a human body.[62]
                A total of 3,250,000 cubic yards (2,480,000 m3) of concrete was used in the dam before concrete pouring ceased on May 29, 1935. In addition, 1,110,000 cubic yards (850,000 m3) were used in the power plant and other works. More than 582 miles (937 km) of cooling pipes were placed within the concrete. Overall, there is enough concrete in the dam to pave a two-lane highway from San Francisco to New York.[47] Concrete cores were removed from the dam for testing in 1995; they showed that "Hoover Dam's concrete has continued to slowly gain strength" and the dam is composed of a "durable concrete having a compressive strength exceeding the range typically found in normal mass concrete".[63] Hoover Dam concrete is not subject to alkali–silica reaction (ASR) as the Hoover Dam builders happened to use nonreactive aggregate, unlike that at downstream Parker Dam, where ASR has caused measurable deterioration.[63]
                Thank you for the very informative post. I have seen documentaries about the construction of the Hover Dam and it boggles my mind!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                  This is a great book on that amazing construction project. I'm talking page burner.
                  Hoover Dam: An American Adventure: Joseph E. Stevens: 9780806122830: Amazon.com: Books

                  I'll bet you can find it at any good sized library.

                  And, General Superintendent Frank Crowe (at right, below)
                  was a construction legend. The Six Companies bid hinged on him being on board.

                  Last edited by Plumbus; 02-16-2014, 09:38 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                    Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                    How does this compare to the 3 million plus cubic yards poured for the Hover Dam? That took two years if I'm correct. Parts of the Dam still curing?
                    But was that a continuous pour, or a series of interlocking pours?

                    I think a cooling tower at a nuke is probably bigger than the pour Rick has pointed out, and they were continous. Had a batch plant right on site making concrete 24/7until the 535 foot tall tower was done. They used a slip form which jacks itself up and is almost constantly moving, slowly, but moving just the same.

                    I think there are poursk in the Three Gorges Dam in China that probably top anything, but this was about a North American record right.
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                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                      Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                      But was that a continuous pour, or a series of interlocking pours?

                      I think a cooling tower at a nuke is probably bigger than the pour Rick has pointed out, and they were continous. Had a batch plant right on site making concrete 24/7until the 535 foot tall tower was done. They used a slip form which jacks itself up and is almost constantly moving, slowly, but moving just the same.

                      I think there are poursk in the Three Gorges Dam in China that probably top anything, but this was about a North American record right.
                      Bob, the devil is in the details. I assumed mistakenly that it was one continuous pour from watching a documentary. Those engineers were pretty smart folks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                        It was posted on pz but it looked like they were using sharkbites on some piping being poured over.
                        Buy cheap, buy twice.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                          Probably used for the cooling lines that they need to help with the curing of the concrete. According to the articles, the concrete is 18' thick.

                          Rick.
                          phoebe it is

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                            Isn't there some sort of major one of a kind freeway outage this weekend in LA as well for pavement reconstruction? They must have every transit mixer in the state there this weekend.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: largest continuous concrete pour going on in los angeles

                              Yes there was. And I was semi stuck in it. We needed to get to the valley to meet up with mark and adam for an early dinner. Drove through the 2 open lanes. Took 1:15 minutes to go 34 miles on a sunday at 3pm. In the evening they have all 6 lanes closed on the north bound 405 freeway. Its an 80 hour holiday weekend project for repaving a 6 mile stretch. All part of the 405 freeway expansion the last few years. By the time it's finished, we'll have already outgrown it. 6 lanes each way is not enough.

                              The drive home, going south was wide open with the portable light towers blazing.

                              Rick.
                              phoebe it is

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