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  • #16
    It's a shame that there's so many hacks out there.
    I run across electrical stuff like this all the time. It's very hard to go after someone years later, and the burden of proof is up to the plaintiff to be able to prove that the defendant is solely responsible.
    As for going after the city, county, or the inspector who approved the permits, they have NO legal liability for passing improper work. Owner could try and sue for malfeasance but he will probably spend more money and time in court than it's worth.

    Sometimes just mentioning to the ahj what "company X" did to them is enough to have them give them a hard time at future inspections, if they aren't willing to help make it right.

    Comment


    • Mightyservant
      Mightyservant commented
      Editing a comment
      We used to mention companies by name until our owner caught wind of it and put it to a stop. Now we just mention the project, the address and let the AHJ figure it out.

      We also take the time to go along with the other trades, to the building dept to help educate the inspectors so they are a little more familiar with acceptable and unacceptable work. It's really helped raise the standards and more uniformly apply the standards to each contractor.
      Last edited by Mightyservant; 09-25-2018, 07:56 PM.

  • #17
    Out here the inspector for 2 residential units or less is a BMI / building mechanical inspector. AKA a Jack of all trades and a master of none. Yet to see them crawl under a house, not that this one required crawling, but they are pretty much useless when it comes to plumbing inspections. Most are ex general contractors that couldn't make it on their own.

    Rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • Mightyservant
      Mightyservant commented
      Editing a comment
      That's unfortunate, San Diego duilding and development has always been decent but the fire department used to be terrible. They sign me off without even looking at anything early in my career, it was frightening. I'd end up have to go back and check my work again just so I could sleep.

      They have gotten way better now and do things by the book, just the way I like it.

  • #18
    Most jurisdictions are understaffed and underbudgeted, and end up hiring inspectors without a thorough understanding of the codes. If you only have minutes for an ispection your going to miss something.

    Oh Btw, isn't that unbonded csst tubing in the photo I see?

    Comment


    • PLUMBER RICK
      PLUMBER RICK commented
      Editing a comment
      No it's a water heater flex connector.

      Rick.

    • johncameron
      johncameron commented
      Editing a comment
      Ok, thanks.

    • Bob D.
      Bob D. commented
      Editing a comment
      Maybe in MI they hire unqualified people, but not here. You either have the quals or you don't. For a state to do any less would just open themselves to a host of lawsuits. All inspectors/code enforcement officers working here are qualified by the state of NJ regardless if they are working at the local or state level. Most hold quals as code official and in two or more specialty areas like Plumbing/Mechanical and Electrical. You have to have years of work experience plus many hours of classes before you can sit for the test which is proctored by an independent third party testing organization, even if you hold a MP license you can't just walk in and become an inspector overnight.

      https://www.state.nj.us/dca/division...g_cont_ed.html

  • #19
    I disagree, anyone can file a lawsuit but the inspection department (ahj) has absolutely no liability that arises from overlooking something. The legality of permits is merely to make sure the city collects their money for the work done.

    Yes, We have similar requirements in Michigan, but just because someone pass the tests and has X hours under their belt doesn't make them know everything. Every scenario and every question can't be asked on a test and many know the correct answers on a test without knowing the theory behind it or to apply it in practical sense..
    The Term "qualified" is subjective to who you ask. I'm not saying their stupid, but I've ran into many that are either plain wrong, or just don't have the time to properly evaluate something.

    Comment


    • Mightyservant
      Mightyservant commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree many are book smart, code smart but have no "game" intelligence quotient. You need to have all of it but more importantly the installing Journymen need to know they're stuff because even if you got work signed off it may not be installed right.

      Installed work should be just above code not the minimum requirements and getting work signed off should be a statement of affirmation.
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