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  • Getting it down before I get it up

    Problem is the 75 gal heater had only 1/4" of clearance even after I removed the gas lines, relief valve piping. House and heater is 10 years old and it's sitting on a platform made of cesarstone.. must have been a leftover piece.

    At 59, Getting it down is not a challenge with the right equipment. Getting it up is just as easy, But in this case, the replacement 75 gal direct vent heater is almost 3x the cost of the Navien condensing. Plus there is a $1000.00 gas co rebate and a $300. Federal tax credit. It's a no Brainer.

    Enjoy the photos while you can. In a couple months, they will all disappear.

    Rick.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20221031_124213.jpg Views:	40 Size:	1.24 MB ID:	754438

    2 lags into the header. Heater is only 225#. Chain doesn't create a shock load like a come along or electric winch.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20221031_123229.jpg Views:	36 Size:	2.20 MB ID:	754439

    Tight as it gets. Cut out the relief valve piping on the right, and gas on the left along with the pump manifold return piping.

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    Click image for larger version  Name:	20221031_123930.jpg Views:	36 Size:	1.84 MB ID:	754441

    Cleared and lowering 18'' to the garage floor.. The chain fall is the best of all my lifting devices. No shock and instant braking. Slow and steady.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20221031_124154.jpg Views:	36 Size:	2.00 MB ID:	754442

    Notice my 1" bull head tees and 1/2" pipe with end caps for safety. Simple 1 man job. Even at 59.
    Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 11-02-2022, 07:15 AM.
    phoebe it is

  • #2
    Nice. You posted something years ago similar to this, but it wasn't as tight a spot as I remember.

    I am not a plumber so I have not replaced many water heaters, residential size anyway. I am a Pipefitter and my rigging experience is for much larger objects such as this pump casing.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Water Pump (Small).jpg
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Size:	99.8 KB
ID:	754445

    I know you will say you've done this 100 times and never had a problem, that's great. But part of that success is luck and carefully maneuvering the WH. But in the process of making the lift you have very little chance of keeping that hook from slipping left or right and throwing the whole lift off balance. Not everyone is as lucky as you. If they were it wouldn't be luck. I wouldn't be surprised if one or more of your WH jobs rigged in this manner didn't slip. And anything that happens during a lift that was not planned is a near miss at best or worse an injury or damage done to some thing.

    For anyone reading this and thinking of doing the same as a former EPRI certified rigger (retied now so no longer certified) if you elect to follow Rick's rigging plan I offer the following comments to make for a safer lift.

    In the last pic your lifting rig built from what you had on hand is clever and probably more than strong enough for the load. The only thing I would do different is I would add some padding over the 1/2" pipe to keep the hook centered between the tees. If the hook slips, and with metal-to-metal it is a definite possibility, your load will shift and it could damage the WH, a wall, or strike you. At the least it will make it more difficult to complete the lift, doesn't matter if you're rigging the old WH out or the new one in. All you need are a couple 3 or 4 inch nipples between the tees leaving a narrow gap for the hook to engage the 1/2" pipe. Then the hook can not slip off center and the load can not shift. You don't even have to use pipe nipples, it could be anything that keep the hook from shifting, it could be wood or a couple pieces of plastic pipe slipped over the 1/2".
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
    http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
    https://youtube.com/@bobd.
    ----

    Comment


    • PLUMBER RICK
      PLUMBER RICK commented
      Editing a comment
      Bob, you're right about keeping it centered. but in this case the heater was on the ground {18''} before the top of it ever left the wall cavity. There was nowhere for the heater to slide left or right. At 225# all I did was guide the heater down. and out. drywall never got scuffed, Other than a spray bottle with soap to clean any finger prints while installing the tankless.

      Rick.

  • #3
    Lifting heavy objects and rigging is definitely interesting. I did not realize Bob was a certified rigger. I also have the issue of having to lift HVAC equipment into attics. I don't have any photos but I use an Supco attic winch (hand crank) designed for this purpose. Two straps go crosswise on the unit to which a hook is attached and then the unit is raised.

    The challenge I sometimes have is that the attic is really low and so installing and using a winch can be a challenge. I ad looked at some of the electric ones from HF but this again has the same issue - not enough room.

    I also was thinking about a lift powered by a CO2 bottle. That looks appropriate for some of my situations. But it would need 2 people - one to raise the platform and one to be in the attic and pull off/move the unit.

    I typically need a helper for at least some phases of an HVAC install - really time consuming to do it alone.

    Comment


    • blue_can
      blue_can commented
      Editing a comment
      Sorry poor wording on my part - I did understand you are no longer certified from your post - should have said "Bob had been a certified rigger"/

    • PLUMBER RICK
      PLUMBER RICK commented
      Editing a comment
      I looked at the co2 lift many years ago and decided against it. it's basically a series of telescoping aluminum pipe cylinders. you would have to lift the ac unit approx 3' to get it onto the platform.
      I have several of the harbor freight cable winches. use to use them for this application and found that it's too fast and has a sudden jerk when starting and stopping. great for lifting heaters up the side of a building 3 floors while riding the exterior ladder as a guide. But there is no variable speed or creep setting. the chain fall makes it simple and 1 hand can pull the chain while 1 hand can easily guide it into the attic opening. The 3 that i have are 10', 20' and 30' lifts The 30' has an enormous amount of chain. 20' would be ideal for an attic.

      Rick.

    • blue_can
      blue_can commented
      Editing a comment
      Rick - yes having to lift something 3 feet first would be an issue especially if you are working alone. In the case of HVAC I would assume that there were 2 people so it should be feasible to load the system on the hoist first and then one person goes up into the attic while the other one wheels the hoist into place and pumps it up. I did not realize you also installed WHs in attics. Here in SD I've never seen a WH in an attic - only the indoor portion of the HVAC, Do you have any pics of your attic install process? How do you get the WH to an upper floor by yourself? How do you setup the WH to be pulled into the attic and then get up into the attic?

  • #4
    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
    Nice. You posted something years ago similar to this, but it wasn't as tight a spot as I remember.

    I am not a plumber so I have not replaced many water heaters, residential size anyway. I am a Pipefitter and my rigging experience is for much larger objects such as this pump casing.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Water Pump (Small).jpg
Views:	178
Size:	99.8 KB
ID:	754445

    I know you will say you've done this 100 times and never had a problem, that's great. But part of that success is luck and carefully maneuvering the WH. But in the process of making the lift you have very little chance of keeping that hook from slipping left or right and throwing the whole lift off balance. Not everyone is as lucky as you. If they were it wouldn't be luck. I wouldn't be surprised if one or more of your WH jobs rigged in this manner didn't slip. And anything that happens during a lift that was not planned is a near miss at best or worse an injury or damage done to some thing.

    For anyone reading this and thinking of doing the same as a former EPRI certified rigger (retied now so no longer certified) if you elect to follow Rick's rigging plan I offer the following comments to make for a safer lift.

    In the last pic your lifting rig built from what you had on hand is clever and probably more than strong enough for the load. The only thing I would do different is I would add some padding over the 1/2" pipe to keep the hook centered between the tees. If the hook slips, and with metal-to-metal it is a definite possibility, your load will shift and it could damage the WH, a wall, or strike you. At the least it will make it more difficult to complete the lift, doesn't matter if you're rigging the old WH out or the new one in. All you need are a couple 3 or 4 inch nipples between the tees leaving a narrow gap for the hook to engage the 1/2" pipe. Then the hook can not slip off center and the load can not shift. You don't even have to use pipe nipples, it could be anything that keep the hook from shifting, it could be wood or a couple pieces of plastic pipe slipped over the 1/2".
    Thanks for the link. I downloaded the Rigger's Handbook and will go over that.

    Comment

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