Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Heating decisions..... Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Heating decisions.....

    Well, I know that types of heat for shops in cold climates have been brought up on this forum. But was hoping to get some opinions on the decision I have been debating on recently. Now that I have completed the additional rooms in the basement for my office and vacated the nursery I have time to get back into the shop. Rather chilly though. I have been going back and forth on the decision between a pellet stove or some type of gas heat in the shop/garage. We are usually hovering anywhere from -10F ~ 35F in the winter, but the shop is well insulated (outside of the garage door itself) and normally keeps around 35F. I am able to get it up to 55F by using a kerosene heater, but takes a few hours and not too cheap.

    I'm attaching a quick drawing I made showing the size and dimensions and was thinking about putting whatever I got in the back corner of the long bay. The breaker box is in the back left corner of that bay so getting whatever power available should not be an issue and we do have natural gas in the house. Also the ceilings are 12 foot. I was just thinking that a pellet stove might be more cost friendly (to buy, have installed and run) than a gas unit. I know those that have posted before have gas units that they like, but are they spendy to run? I'm not looking to keep the garage in t-shirt/shorts weather 24x7, but warmer during the weekends when I have time to get out there. I'm thinking the pellet stove would only be a few bucks a day....

    Any thoughts or opinions? Hoping to get things warmer so I can start assembling my new shop from the disaster that is left from the move!
    Attached Files
    Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

  • #2
    Re: Heating decisions.....

    I think you'll soon tire of having to add fuel and clean up ashes all the time with a pellet burner. The big advantage of using nautral gas is that it's nice and clean. You'll most likely need a good plumber to bring gas to your shop and help with the flue venting. Be sure the discharge blows along the coldest long wall. You might want to install a small wall mount or ceiling fan to help stir up the air so you don't have warm and cold spots. Remember that heat rises so you want to blow it toward the floor. Because a woodworking shop gets dusty, I would do a garage style unit heater. Take a look at the PDF file and you may get some ideas. You may want to consult a HVAC contractor for sizing and code issues.
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Heating decisions.....

      Thanks Woussko. I am actually not too concerned with clean up from the pellet stove. Having spent the better part of my childhood life cleaning out wood burning stoves and furnaces as part of the chores and now cleaning up after my own family this will actually be fine to clean up my own mess. What I am hoping to get more feedback on is the possible cost differences between the pellet stove vs. gas heater. Primarily in respect to installation costs, initial purchase price, and usage.

      I have looked around my area and know I can purchase what I believe to be a decent size pellet stove and have it installed for about $1500 total. I am figuring a few dollars a day for fuel. I have not yet had the chance to price around gas heating options and associated costs. But would a gas heater be much different in price to run? I belive I could get one for about same price as the stove, but not sure about installation costs or running costs with the price of gas these days....
      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Heating decisions.....

        There's only one way too heat a shop----by burning wood! I just purchased the brand new Ridgid CS6524 65cc gas-powered chain saw with a 24" bar, which works great for cutting it (wood).

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Heating decisions.....

          LanceT, while I tend to agree with you, I am avoiding wood burning as that will cause my home insurance to nearly double. For some reason a pellet stove falls into some "safer" category for insurance in my area and won't have such an affect in that regard. I also have the option to install a pellet stove myself, while a wood stove or gas heat would not be legal for me to do so. Although I am pretty sure I will have whatever I choose to be installed by a professional just to be on the safe side.
          Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Heating decisions.....

            Let's hope someone that has used a pellet heater can shed some light on fuel costs. Have you ever thought about some way to burn up trash for heat? That only works if you live out in the country. In a city it's NO way. I really can't say about the cost for gas as I have no good idea of your actual heating load or what you pay per "Therm" unit there. What I can say is that all types of fuel have and most likely will continue to rise in cost. That's where buring trash and wood scraps would lower your fuel cost. As for insurance, maybe they are worried about sparks from a wood stove setting fires.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Heating decisions.....

              I have a gas heater mounted from the ceiling in my shop. The shop is 16x20 and takes about 10 minutes for the temp to go from 45 to 60. The thermostat only goes down to 45, most nights it's around 50 in the shop. It's those super cold nights that it drops to 45 and trips the heater. My gas bill has gone up but it didn't break the bank, yet. As far as costs for purchase and installation, I'm no help. I bought the house in June of last year and everything was already there, including the shop. I did read an article where the most recommended type, I'm not sure of the name, is a tube that runs the length of the ceiling and radiates heat down, as seen in auto shops. This also warms the tool surfaces which then transmits some heat itself. I have noticed my TS takes quite a while to come up in temp when touching it. If I find the article I'll let you know. It was in a wood working mag, can you imagine that.
              If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Heating decisions.....

                Amcnerl,

                What you have is called a radiant tube heater. Many companies make them and you just order by the length you need. They are quite efficient and we install a lot of them in shops.

                Roberts Gordon is on company name if anyone wants to check them out.

                Regards,

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Heating decisions.....

                  My wife and I recently built a new home and installed radiant heating in the bathroom and kitchen. We did it through the company Heatizon Systems and have no complaints. We absolutely love it!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Heating decisions.....

                    When I bought my new home a few months back, I was rather surprised to see that the builders put in a heating duct from my central air into the garage. Since it is rather silly to air condition the garage, I keep the vent closed during the summer, but in the winter it'll be interesting to see if it keeps the garage warm enough to do some work in there and how badly it hits the heating bill.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X