Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

    What kind of saw would cut plexi-glass most effiently? If you guys could help me out that would be great! Thanks!
    -Yennek

  • #2
    Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

    table saw would work. plywood blade turning backwards,

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

      I used a band saw. Feed the workpiece in slowly and consistently. It worked fine. There was no melting of the edge, and it was relatively smooth. Final smoothing was done w/wet-dry sandpaper (400grit, I think).
      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

        I've used VASandy's method & can recomend it. For shapes, figures, circular cuts etc, a 125mm angle grinder with a cutting blade 1.6mm or 1mm , for stainless steel, works surprisingly well. It's as if the little bit of melting helps things around, and if you tidy things up ,the way Sandy reccomends, then you get a real neat job. Even bending and rolling can be done if you warm the plexiglass up in very hot water, or carefully with a hot air blower.
        Some poor qualities aren't very good to work with, but you know this after the first cut.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

          agreed bandsaw, works great
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

            Larger squared pieces are quickly and accurately cut on the tablesaw. Smal or curved pieces use the bandsaw.
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

              Ive never done anything special with the blade, just used a regular carbide blade that was already in the saw. You just want to hold the piece down and if its really thin make sure it doesnt slip under your fence

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What kind of saw should use on plexi-glass

                If its a straight cut, and it is truly plexiglas (poly acrylate, not polycarbonate or polythylene) you can score both sides fairly deeply using a straight edge and a machinist scripe or kraft knife and snap it off. I have done this on plexiglas up to 1/4" thick. The trick is to score it well on both sides and completely to both ends, lay the score line on the sharp edge of a hard board or table, and clamp it with a board over it on the table side of the score. If the piece is long, clamp two boards above and below it about 1/4" away from the score on the overhang side to get even pressure on it when you snap it.
                Plexiglas is more brittle than poly carbonate, so has more of a tendency to chip or crack if you get it pinched or if it vibrates when cutting it. Carbide blades work if you make sure you feed it slow and straight. A bandsaw works good but something like a scroll saw that moves up and down is difficult to use. If you try a scroll saw, put a piece of wood over the top to stop the vibration, or sandwich it between two pieces. A jigsaw will require sandwiching.
                A blow torch or LP torch or hi-temp heat gun with a heat spreader can be played over the edge to get it to melt smooth and clear. If you cut it with a saw, sand the saw marks out first.
                This may work on Lexan (polycarbonate) but I have not tried it. Lexan is easier to cut because it is not as brittle.

                Go
                Practicing at practical wood working

                Comment

                Working...
                X