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  • DIYer identifier

    a. Have you ever changed your own automobile oil?
    b. Are you a ASE certified mechanic?

    a. Have you ever changed out a light switch or outlet in your home?
    b. Are you a licensed electrician?

    a. Have you ever unclogged a drainpipe in your home?
    b. Are you a plumber?

    a. Have you ever painted your house?
    b. Are you a licensed painter?

    If you answered yes to (a) and no to (b) in any of the groups, you, my friend, are a DIYer.

    Anybody with any gumption is a DIYer to some extent. I'm not condoning an ametuer doing something dangerous, just making a point that maybe some people should look in the mirror before they start bashing others.
    ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

  • #2
    Re: DIYer identifier

    When did they start requiring a license to paint? I have know a number of paint "contractors" and they never had a licence. they jsut bid on jobs and painted.

    And ASE as stated is a certification, and all it means is one can pass a test not fix a car,

    Yes I am a PRO DIY,
    repair and over haul cars and trucks in the shop, rebuilt both gas and diesel engines, and automatic transmissions,
    do machine shop work. two lathes, a 13" and a 24" swing, a Bridgeport mill,
    pour and finish concrete, build and frame buildings, roofing, and do dry wall, and all the other good stuff,
    have drawn up and design buildings, that were built for others.
    have painted many a barn and buildings,
    have built high end custom cabinets,
    cleaned drains and do plumbing maintenance,
    have operated and maintained a commercial water and wast treatment plant
    pull wells and maintained and rebuild windmills and set up towers,
    have wired barns and buildings on my own place,
    installed walk in coolers and freezers, and maintain them.
    have installed 3 phase generators,
    built wood working machinery,
    built and rebuilt trailers, loader for tractors, even in the process of building a back hoe,
    I have tore down many a building for salvage.
    oh and I farm and ranch do vet work,
    milk goats
    butcher and cut meat.
    even took EMT training,
    do stain glass work, for my cabinets and for other design needs.
    change and repair my own tires and have my own tire machine,
    build and maintain, over 6 miles of fence, and build and tear down 2 to 6 miles of temporary fence most Evey year,
    that is a few of the DIY things I have done over the years
    (in some areas I have even had a licence)



    As far as it goes even a "licenced" trade member is a DIY if he works on his own stuff even in the area of his trade.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: DIYer identifier

      BHD...your kind is old time know how from hard experience...I can respect that and even humbly admit to learning a few things, despite my license.
      What gets me is when a landlord does his own gas work at the expense of his tennants and decides it's ok to connect a powervent to the same chimney as his boiler...or when a 10th floor condo owner decides to do his own water & drainage then asks if I cover his work with MY insurance, as well as discount my rate for the fact that the work's "mostly done". (both are previous customers, one was an estimate only...guess which one).
      Last edited by DuckButter; 07-25-2007, 03:32 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: DIYer identifier

        DuckButter believe me I do understand what your saying some people should not be aloud near tools,

        If some one is willing to learn and to do it properly I have no problem,
        but when they don't want to learn or to do it right and it endangers others, that is a problem

        and I don't care if it is a DYI or a PRO if it is not done right it is not right.

        some of it is some people don't want to learn to do it right, they jsut want it done, and as long as it will work to a from of satisfaction they are happy, whether it is dangerous or not,

        example: I have a friend who farms, the switch went out on his farm fuel pump, so he took out the switch (120 volts) and now jsut hooks the bare wire ends together that are sticking out of the electrical box to make the fuel pump run, on his gasoline tank. I said to him get that fixed before you either set the thing on fire or electrocute your self, and he responded "well it works this way may be sometime".

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        I may be wrong about this but in the rural and farm communities I do believe people grow up with more mechanical back ground and seem to have a fuller understanding of how things work,

        this last week, our church, and has for the last 7 years had an affiliation with a church in the Denver region, and our local church hosts what we term as a "youth work retreat" mostly it is city kids want to experience some farm life, and work, I had about 10 kids (most were a different group each day, some repeats) for 4 days,
        most of these kids had never sat in the drivers seat, and were in the 14 and up, (unless they had there drivers licence), one little gal said she once drove a golf cart, and that was the total of her driving experience, I know that least half of the group had never drive a motor vehicle of any type, some have never even pushed a lawn mower.

        my son solo in driving a pick up when he was 6 years old, (it happened to be a emergency and went to get help about one mile each way),


        the majority did not know how to hold a hammer or operate a shovel,
        it took 7 kids two days to strip off two layers of wood shingles off a small building 16' X 30', they had fun tho,

        I am not condemning them at all, but the work experience that they had been exposed to was mostly Nil.

        Where my son was in the shop helping over haul engines and build things on job sites, when he was 12,

        he knew animal care, could rope and ride like a pro cowboy at 14,(I have never been able to rope or ride a horse), he dug out the old horse harness and taught the horses to pull a wagon one year,

        when he was 16 he was rebuilding Chevy 350 engines for his truck,
        one harvest he when he was about 14 he backed the truck in to the family car, and bent up the fender, I had him take the fender off and taught him to pound it out and then replaced it on the car.

        these kids that came hardly saw there fathers, I asked one gal what her dad did and she said (such and such, and then said all I have ever seen him do is look at the results of the tests at his office, had never seen the equipment that was used and had no real idea what he did do besides look at papers).

        my son was running the combine and helping fix it when he was 15, one of my daughter was hauling wheat in a 2 1/2 ton truck when she was 17. all of the kids knew how to care for animals, help them birth, etc,
        if we need some thing done on the farm we did ourselves and uslay one of the kids got the experience of working with me in the process, I had one of my daughters working as a hod carrier when we remolded the credit union building in town, my son helped when we delivered and finished assembled the cabinets for the "Convenience and video store, and to put on the counter tops it took a 24' trailer to jsut to haul the pieces to town.

        my brothers boy was in collage and there was some road construction going on near his dorm and he looked out and said HUM I could run all that stuff, (and he had ran most of that kind of equipment, commercial loaders, backhoes, road graders, semi trucks and dump trucks, and tractors of all types), my brothers farm makes mine look like a hobby farm.

        but so many people to day do not have any opportunities to learn like I did or my kids have been able to,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: DIYer identifier

          I am the proud father of six Do-it-Yourselfers. I believe as a parent we need to provide more than a roof over their head and a meal in their stomach. Along with having them work in the Plumbing business we also were General Contractors and they helped there as well. When the kids got their first cars they got a box of tools with them and were expected to keep them up. That said I did have one son who learned management skills by having his buddies fix his car instead.

          As a result my oldest daughter and her husband just built there first home and it means a little more to them because they built it by themselves with the help of their three kids. My oldest son is in the military so he moves too much to have a home but built a beautiful 69 Ford Torino GT. My middle son didn’t learn much except for delegating labor but he’s a good kid and can do it if he needed to. My youngest son flipped his first condo and is now out in the country remodeling their new home. My middle daughter flipped her first condo and just finished her remodel in their new home. My youngest daughter (still single) has already flipped her first condo and is waiting to find her first house.

          My point of the above is the teachings they received as kids has allowed them to do things they may have been afraid to do otherwise. I have worked for so many young couples who pay a lot of money for things they probably could have done themselves but were afraid to try. There is plenty of work out there for the Pros and I think it is a mistake to denigrate those brave enough to try to do it themselves.

          Of course I’m not sure those who have soured on D-I-Y’ers really have a problem with the guys/gals who come in here asking for help and are appreciative of the advice. I believe the real problem is with guys like gdavis who come in here claiming to be an engineer and a GC and he hasn’t got a clue then belittles those he has asked for help from.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: DIYer identifier

            Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
            I am the proud father of six Do-it-Yourselfers. I believe as a parent we need to provide more than a roof over their head and a meal in their stomach. Along with having them work in the Plumbing business we also were General Contractors and they helped there as well. When the kids got their first cars they got a box of tools with them and were expected to keep them up. That said I did have one son who learned management skills by having his buddies fix his car instead.

            As a result my oldest daughter and her husband just built there first home and it means a little more to them because they built it by themselves with the help of their three kids. My oldest son is in the military so he moves too much to have a home but built a beautiful 69 Ford Torino GT. My middle son didn’t learn much except for delegating labor but he’s a good kid and can do it if he needed to. My youngest son flipped his first condo and is now out in the country remodeling their new home. My middle daughter flipped her first condo and just finished her remodel in their new home. My youngest daughter (still single) has already flipped her first condo and is waiting to find her first house.

            My point of the above is the teachings they received as kids has allowed them to do things they may have been afraid to do otherwise. I have worked for so many young couples who pay a lot of money for things they probably could have done themselves but were afraid to try. There is plenty of work out there for the Pros and I think it is a mistake to denigrate those brave enough to try to do it themselves.

            Of course I’m not sure those who have soured on D-I-Y’ers really have a problem with the guys/gals who come in here asking for help and are appreciative of the advice. I believe the real problem is with guys like gdavis who come in here claiming to be an engineer and a GC and he hasn’t got a clue then belittles those he has asked for help from.

            Mark

            I so agree with you Mark,

            I do belive kids should have structure and firm hand in their life. They should be thought respect,work and how to respect and value money. And cause of that your children are succesful.

            If you don't teach you children that they will never know the true meaning of hard work and money.Your children have a succesful father and they learned from the best.

            I'm not kissing your a..s by saying all those thing but i belive that parents are childrens role model and what you do it will reflect in your children.

            I need to admit i'am a diy-er.Since i was little i would do everything by myself and trying to fix whats broke.If i broke it then i would be in trouble

            I tried to change my faucet yesterday,i googled everything on instalation,got my homework ready and then robert didnt want to give me the pliers.

            I keep telliing him i need my own toolbox with screwdrivers,pliers....he keeps saying i'll hurt myself

            I'll try to fix eveything bymyself until i broke it and he knows that

            Anywho Mark you must be so proud on having wonderfull kids and grandkids

            zeljka
            sigpic

            Robert

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: DIYer identifier

              I guess I'm somewhat jaded there...self employed, I get alot of calls from people who do things like buy the cheapest fixture they can...then expect me to do it cheaper ("no sir...I can't install that kitchen faucet in ten minutes just because it cost less money").
              The fact is cheaper is usually more difficult..like a cheap faucet that has easily breakable plastic parts or handles that wobble and they wind up insinuating I did something wrong.
              I had one customer buy a floor model and blame me when both lever handles were hot (they both turned the same way, in the closed position one was facing out into the basin, I was greeted with outrage when I explained the 2nd trip wouldn't be free, despite the fact that I'd recommended they NOT buy that name beforehand).
              Then there was a guy who couldn't figure out what the problem was on his brand new hot water heater...he'd gotten a less expensive NG instead of LP and expected me to swap out the "few little parts" for short money, because "it should only take 15 minutes".
              I'm ok with DIY, as long as you don't hold the pro you wind up calling responsible for the mistakes already made, and understand that often the work that was already done often has to be undone, meaning more time to redo it the second time.
              Mark, in your line of work I'm sure you see the end results of many corners that had been cut, I know of a lot of shops that cut those corners so they can keep their prices "competitive".
              The last shop I worked for I walked, after spending three days on a job with an unlicensed guy who decided he was his own boss and the owner told me he wanted him on his own..to save money.
              He spent 2 full days attempting to repair a defective new 75 gal powervented WH that wouldn't stay lit, he had it completely dismantled when I went over to check in on him on day 2.
              After 5 minutes of looking at it, I glanced up and noticed he was attempting to tie it into a 2" vent.
              We'd had other problems, none of his gas held pressure...closet flange was glued in sticking out of the floor by 2".
              I told him either he was going to be working with me from that point on, or I was going to be working somewhere else.
              I've been self employed since.
              The trouble, from what I can see, is a lesson I was immediately taught when I first started....you MUST respect the trade, you can't just let anyone jump in and decide they're a "plumber".

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: DIYer identifier

                10 minutes? you are not able to do a k/s faucet in 10 mins your slow ducky!

                Kidding

                I completely agree with you ducky, very, very true on so many levels ducky.

                Excuse my wife about her "frugalness"
                sigpic

                Robert

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: DIYer identifier

                  Originally posted by westcoastplumber View Post
                  10 minutes? you are not able to do a k/s faucet in 10 mins your slow ducky!

                  Kidding

                  I completely agree with you ducky, very, very true on so many levels ducky.

                  Excuse my wife about her "frugalness"
                  TEN MINUTES!!!
                  How the heck do ya squeeze in the two coffee breaks?!?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: DIYer identifier

                    Everyone’s tale on DIY is a little different and there is no perfect answer. I remember when the first Home Depot came to town and all the plumbers were so worried about it. I saw it as a positive because it made more people want to remodel their homes.

                    What ended up happening was more people called for estimates and asked if they could supply their own parts. I explained to them that was fine but I would not guarantee the parts only the labor. Some bought their own parts and some did not but I still made a ton of money I would not have made otherwise. In addition, I got a lot of work from those who tried to install their own and were not successful.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: DIYer identifier

                      Oh boy...I don't even wanna go there!
                      Got a call last week for a water htr...the guy is a landlord and wants his tennants hot water back on asap...I respected that and told him I'd be back to him in a half hour after I rescheduled my other less urgent jobs.
                      Called him back and he says "I'm sorry, HD has someone to do it for $100 less....maybe if you can match that I'll cancel."
                      I explained to him that HD subs get much less than they would for doing it on their own...and they usually wind up tacking "necessary" add-ons after the fact.
                      I got a call back two days ago...he simply said "I'm sorry...you were right...when can you do it?"
                      I'll be doing it next week for the right price, no bells, no whistles.
                      My guess is he will have to discount the rent this month.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: DIYer identifier

                        bhd. i want to go to your farm and play there too

                        sounds like it would be more fun than "city slickers".

                        too bad i live in the big city. i think i would love the country life.

                        need any helpers for a week or 2


                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: DIYer identifier

                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                          bhd. i want to go to your farm and play there too

                          sounds like it would be more fun than "city slickers".

                          too bad i live in the big city. i think i would love the country life.

                          need any helpers for a week or 2


                          rick.
                          Me too....me too!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: DIYer identifier

                            BHD, very well put. I could not possibly agree more. My sister and I were just having a very similar discussion a couple of weeks ago and came to very similar agreements on the differences between how we grew up in the country and how several of our friends who grew up in the City (Phoenix and Denver). The contrast on some things can be quite remarkable.
                            Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: DIYer identifier

                              Originally posted by wwsmith View Post
                              BHD, very well put. I could not possibly agree more. My sister and I were just having a very similar discussion a couple of weeks ago and came to very similar agreements on the differences between how we grew up in the country and how several of our friends who grew up in the City (Phoenix and Denver). The contrast on some things can be quite remarkable.
                              Oh yeah...imagine a ten story high-rise residential apt bldg....the resident handyman isn't gonna be tweakin' that boiler!

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