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  • #16
    Re: Do you remember?

    G J
    There's got to be something special that you remember. Please think really hard.

    Zeljka
    Please tell us about things you remember back home in your childhood days. I'm sure everyone would love to read it.
    Last edited by Woussko; 08-25-2007, 07:22 PM.

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    • #17
      Re: Do you remember?

      This is something I sure do remember and wish they would have today. FULL SERVICE at the local gasoline stations and where they actually did have a full time mechanic that we got to know by name who cared about his work. Today I see far too many high $$$ YUP-PEE cars under a year old blasting blue smoke out the exhaust. Can anyone guess why that is? How about looking a little in parking lots and seeing tires that NO way have more than 10 PSI air pressure in them? There's far more than just fueling up and driving.

      I can remember the old black cast iron rotary dial table top phone made by Western Electric that just would never die no matter what and that had a real bell ringing sound that you could hear in a noisy area. The phone company paid good money for them and when they switched to Touch Tone service we had to upgrade. They would sell them for $100 each and at that time NO one in his/her right mind was about to pay that much for one. Today on flea bay I bet one in nice shape would being over $1000.!!!
      Last edited by Woussko; 08-25-2007, 08:25 PM.

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      • #18
        Re: Do you remember?

        Originally posted by BHD View Post
        What does it mean if you still have rotary phones, yes one in the kitchen,
        and only got off the party line systems a few years ago,
        still only get a few TV stations, via antenna,
        and the county Sheriff still calls you by your first name.

        In my town if the sheriff knows you by name that's a bad thing

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        • #19
          Re: Do you remember?

          Went to Grand Rapids MN., for a soccer game. Stopped at a gas station in a town called Floodwood. They had full service and the gas was cheaper than where I live. He checked the oil, windshield fluid, washed the windows and pumped the gas, went to tip him and he absolutely refused my generosity. He also was the cashier, there was a couple inside waiting for him and they didn't look mad or anything for having to wait....
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Do you remember?

            Originally posted by Woussko View Post
            G J
            There's got to be something special that you remember. Please think really hard.

            Zeljka
            Please tell us about things you remember back home in your childhood days. I'm sure everyone would love to read it.

            Childhood?? Going to the shelter couple times a day cause there was a war..kinda being excited cause i was able to hang out with my friends for 5-6 hrs a day..or beign afraid if the serbians are going to come and kill us allHearing the sirens and people panic everywhere

            My parents having divorce and was able to control both of them...missing school saying to my dad i was sick and not to tell my mom or telling my mom i'm going to school and go shopping and later to my dad's house

            Double presents..

            Cleaning the house and my dad giving me the reward money to get ice-cream

            Making homemade pizza or helping my mom in the kitchen

            My mom always cooking for me whatever i want,now i'm the one that cooks

            Having a hamster that excaped and got behing the sofa and someone moved the sofa and squashed him...my mom told me he died cause he ate too much

            Fresh bread-bakery in my buidling,just had to go down the elavator

            Seaside for 2 months straigs..clean sea,salt water,seing fishes swimming around you

            Dinners along the shore,ocean breeze,clean fresh air

            2 months vacation a year that we croatians get

            People respecting each other

            Lot of knowledge in the schools

            Milk in the karton thingy

            Yellow eggs not white like here

            Small cars

            Not paying for the HOA-S-we take care of our surrounding by ourselves

            Morning coffe-don't drink or juice in the city with bunch of gossip

            Going to Italy -2 hrs away from my moms house to go for cheaper clothing

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Do you remember?

              I remember being around 17 or 18 and being able to go out on a friday night with $10.00 in my pocket and waking up with change...

              Draft beer was .45¢ a glass and cigarettes were .50¢ a pack
              Cheers! - Jim
              -------------
              All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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              • #22
                Re: Do you remember?

                I remember going to school in Hawai'i with my bodyboard and heading straight to Pipes right after school ended on the #52 bus for 75 cents. Our house had no climate control and we never needed it. On weekends, my friends and I would surf all day and fish at night and sleep on the beach listening to the waves. We would laugh at the haoles as they would ask us if we understand english and accepted American money. I would freedive at 3 tables and sit on the bottom for what would seem like an eternity watching the fish curiously swim towards me. The national cigarette of Hawai'i helped out.

                I remember going to South Point on the Big Island during the summer and camping out for a month at a time eating what we catch. I remember bringing fish to families because the husband lost his job at the the Dole plantation. We were never rich but we always had food because other families would do the same for us when times got tough. Families would always stick together. We would sit at parties and listen to the old papa san tell us stories of the days before the hotels and overdevelopment of the land.

                We always respected our elders and there were many a time when one of my Samoan friends' dad would come to school because their kid was acting up. They wouldn't get a talking to either, it usually involved a belt coming off and being used as a medivial weapon. I remember when they would burn the sugarcane fields and the ash would settle on our house looking like black snow. The rainbows were seen everyday and taken for granted until you remember them as in only memories.

                The chicken katsu, loco mocos and spam musibi at Zippy's were the best. There was a Samoan church in Kahuku I would go to on Saturdays for their fundraisers. $5 bought you a meal big enough for two serving(Samoan size portions). We were always having a luau somewhere and everyone always showed up. No one was ever denied.

                I can still smell the ocean and I remember how the breeze felt. Most of all, I remember waking up everyday and thinking how lucky I am to be growing up in Hawai'i. Sniff sniff, thanks Woussko, you got me all homesick now.
                Buy cheap, buy twice.

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                • #23
                  Re: Do you remember?

                  Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                  I remember going to school in Hawai'i with my bodyboard and heading straight to Pipes right after school ended on the #52 bus for 75 cents. Our house had no climate control and we never needed it. On weekends, my friends and I would surf all day and fish at night and sleep on the beach listening to the waves. We would laugh at the haoles as they would ask us if we understand english and accepted American money. I would freedive at 3 tables and sit on the bottom for what would seem like an eternity watching the fish curiously swim towards me. The national cigarette of Hawai'i helped out.

                  I remember going to South Point on the Big Island during the summer and camping out for a month at a time eating what we catch. I remember bringing fish to families because the husband lost his job at the the Dole plantation. We were never rich but we always had food because other families would do the same for us when times got tough. Families would always stick together. We would sit at parties and listen to the old papa san tell us stories of the days before the hotels and overdevelopment of the land.

                  We always respected our elders and there were many a time when one of my Samoan friends' dad would come to school because their kid was acting up. They wouldn't get a talking to either, it usually involved a belt coming off and being used as a medivial weapon. I remember when they would burn the sugarcane fields and the ash would settle on our house looking like black snow. The rainbows were seen everyday and taken for granted until you remember them as in only memories.

                  The chicken katsu, loco mocos and spam musibi at Zippy's were the best. There was a Samoan church in Kahuku I would go to on Saturdays for their fundraisers. $5 bought you a meal big enough for two serving(Samoan size portions). We were always having a luau somewhere and everyone always showed up. No one was ever denied.

                  I can still smell the ocean and I remember how the breeze felt. Most of all, I remember waking up everyday and thinking how lucky I am to be growing up in Hawai'i. Sniff sniff, thanks Woussko, you got me all homesick now.
                  Those are such a nice memories Ben...

                  I thought you were born in germany

                  My mom is crazy about hawaii......

                  I'm trying to convince robert to go next year..You will definatly tell us where to go

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Do you remember?

                    I don't have a memory of Hawaii (wish I did though), but I remember most of the other stuff quite well.

                    When I was a little kid, I remember home delivery was no big deal. The Dry Cleaner would stop at the house, if you put the card in the window. Milk got delivered twice a week, and the "egg man" used to stop by once or twice a week. Even the Doctor would come to the house with his little black bag. But there was no such thing as "food delivery", unless of course your Mom was sick. Then she could call her order in to the local grocery store and they'd deliver it to the house... without delivery charges!

                    We never knew any mothers that "worked". As I recall, the only women that worked were single. Ah, liberation!

                    My Dad was an automechanic in a gas station and with that, he could afford to buy a house and a newer car every three years, take us on a vacation every now and then, and still afford to save a bit here and there. And yes, they had one of those red Coke machines that rolled out a glass bottle for a nickle deposit.

                    I remember the big radio with the tiny little amber light in the dial. Listening to Paul and Mary Ford (music), Pam and Jerry North (suspense), The Green Hornet, The Intersanctum, Jack Benny, The Lone Ranger, etc. I remember that I was only seven or eight when I joined the Boys Club and it was safe to walk a dozen blocks to get there. That was the year we bought our first television; and as I recall my Saturday mornings were filled with Space Patrol, Rin Tin Tin, and Sky King.

                    My first real job after high school was as a bus boy in Fowler's dept. store in downtown Binghamton. It was 1963 and I was paid $1.25/hr and my shift was only 28.5 hours a week. I got that job in August and by Christmas I had saved enough money to buy my mother a Smith-Corona typewriter and my dad a Rockwell sabre saw, and that was on top of the $17 a week I gave my folks for "room and board". The best shirt in the store cost me about three hours of work and a pair of thier best leather gloves was about four hours.

                    I left the bus boy job at the end of that year and took a job in a factory making $1.35/hr as an electro/mechanical quality inspector. In October, I moved up to job in an office building. I was making $1.85/hr and by May, 1965 I bought my first brand new car. It was VW 1200 Beatle which cost me $1856, complete with the AM radio, white wall tires and optional "gas heater". As I recall the minimum wage was still $1.25.

                    I do remember that beer was 20 cents a glass and steamed clams were 35 cents a dozen and the new McDonalds sold burgers for 15 cents and fries for 20. A milkshake was 35 cents and it all fit my meal budget quite well.

                    Likewise, the movies were 85 cents and a box of popcorn was a quarter and there was always a "double-feature". Gas was 28 cents a gallon and they came out to pump it, clean your windshield, and if you filled up, they'd give you a free steak knife or a glass.

                    If you wanted pizza (what we all called, "hot pie") you'd have to go to one of only a handful of restaurants that sold it. If you wanted to take it home, you called in your order and then picked it up at the "back door" to the kitchen!

                    Having to go for a hospital stay, was a budget killer though. In the mid-to-late 60's that was about $35 a day! We used to gripe that you could stay at the best hotel in town for half the price. I remember when my son was born in 1969, the bill came to almost $400. My work medical paid the whole thing though...except for the phone and televion in the room. That cost us $12, as I recall.

                    Up until the late 60's we had what were referred to as "Blue Laws". That meant that certain types of business could not be conducted on Sunday. So, it was rare that anyone worked on Sunday, as retail stores were closed, as well as most restuarants and gas stations. Therefore, Sunday's were always spent with family and even in my late teens and early 20's, Sunday dinner was a well respected event. Funny how we managed to survive that.

                    Funny too was the fact that, even during the week most businesses closed at 5:30 or 6:00 pm. The only shopping night in Binghamton was on Thusday, when the stores would be open until 9:00... even during the Christmas shopping season.

                    But by the late 60's all that seemed to change. Retailers screamed for repeal of the "blue laws" and it happened. By 1968 the "Mall" became part of our vocabulary and they were open every night until late and were always open on Sunday. The downtown stores just started fading away. Inflation became a key word in the news (remember Nixon's wage/price freeze?) and the cost of everything seemed to almost double overnight.

                    During the 70's, the American dream started turning into a nightmare, IMO. People worried about gas shortages, factory closings, taxes, high food prices. Movie theaters dropped the "double-feature" and many dropped thier concession stands.

                    As prices went up, quality (and the sense of quality) went down. More "fast food" places, more malls, and discount department stores. But the full-service gas station became a thing of the past.

                    I remember that while VW's were fairly popular in the 60's, nobody owned anything from Asia. I do remember one of the supervisors at work bought a Datsen for his wife. That was in 1968. It was really small, and rather gauddy in style with little "winglets" stuck on the rear quarter roof pillars.

                    By the mid-70's, most American cars turned into pure junk. My new 76 Mercury had over 30 defects on it that took the dealer over a week to fix. Purchased in May, it had rust through by August, and paint literally falling off it by fall. It was almost embarrassing, to admit that I actually paid money for that. By 1984 the car was so corroded it couldn't be driven.

                    Fortunately we've come a long way since the 70's. I don't think we'll ever return to the rememberances of the 50's and 60's (real or imagined). But it's nice to take a minute or two to look back. If you missed it, well then I'm sure you'll look at your time fondly too. I do wonder how we'll view these past few years, with a or ?

                    CWS
                    Last edited by CWSmith; 08-27-2007, 01:13 AM.

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