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Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

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  • Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

    Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?


    It does not take much effort to find on this board...or any other trade related board, someone torque off about brand x, y, z. of power tools being junk...heck I'm amazed to see people slamming Ridgid brand on this board...and the post not being squashed.

    So it hit me, does any brand, really make high quality, power tools, for professional users?

    I really don't think any one makes a true professional, heavy user power tool...doing HVAC I use my cordless tools mainly for doing change outs. So build a stand. Cut some 2x4s and plywood. and other such stuff. But not a major amount of wood, and only a few days a week at the most. So tools my co-workers or I might think meets our need, might make a carpenter cuss to no end. Same with powered screew drivers. I use mine for removing panels, not exactly hard by any standards, also to drive a self tapping screw now and then, maybe even a tapcon to strap down a wire, again not really heavy duty work.

    That said, I can say my work load killed a Hitachi 12v, a DeWalt 9v drill (gravity drop test took out the 7.2v), My Ridgid 18v drill sits in the closet since its not a hammer drill I use the Dewalt 18v for drilling holes in walls, and my little Skil 10.6v for panel removal, the 18v is just too much for removing panels, and don't fit into the tool bag. but I think my DeWalt 18v XRP is junky, batteries lasted only 1 yr. And I'm just not impressed with them. My co-worker(s) 1 swears by Ryobi, 1 by Firestorm, but none of these have impressed me when I tried them out...battery life being a big thing.

    Soooo I really don't think any one makes a true professional, heavy user power tool.

  • #2
    Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

    FEIN, FESTOOL,some METABO tools and MILWAUKEE corded drills (most) and their famous corded models of Sawzall.

    The Bosch and Skill worm drive circular saws need to be included in the list.

    Question: Does your question apply to corded or only to cordless power tools?
    Last edited by Woussko; 11-01-2007, 09:22 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

      flat out ope to cord or cordless.... heck toss in regualr hand tools if u wish....just something that hit me as everything being made cheaper...wimpy-er these days....please just dont get me started on a rant about tubeing cutters I'd need a big soap box and 90% would be @#$%^&^

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      • #4
        Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

        No, there are none.

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        • #5
          Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

          I would say that there are certainly some specialty tools that would be classified as professional grade. On the other hand, I doubt if any one manufacturer can be singled out as having their entire line produced to professional standards.

          There also is the unanswered question of "what is considered professional grade"? Consumers have demanded that manufacturers keep prices down and there is only one way to do that, make the product with less expensive parts and labor. In most cases that also results in a lesser end product. As an example, I have a Milwaukee Hole Shooter that I bought in 1975. Today, that drill sells for basically the same money as I paid in 1975 but between the two I'd say that my 1975 version is a better quality product than todays version.

          In the old days products lasted longer but taking inflation into account todays tools are, price wise, a bargain. That 1975 Milwaukee drill in 1975 dollars probably would cost $600 or $700 in todays dollars.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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          • #6
            Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

            Like others have said, the definition of "Professional Grade" is subjective. Is a rough framer on a "temp powered" job site any more of a "professional" than a cabinetmaker inside a shop? Admittedly the tools are not necessarily the same either, but some overlap, to some degree anyway.
            Both would use a CMS, but not in the same way.
            Cordless drills and or impact drivers too, but not the same requirements there either.
            Table saw too... I'm sure there are many others.

            This has to be at least part of the reason for varying opinions on this subject. Tools really don't need to exceed the specifications that you require in your application, and what is required for some is insignificant to others.
            Inside a shop, battery run-time is not that big of a deal. There is another one just a few feet away on the charger. To a construction worker that might have to get down from where he is working to walk a long way for another. It may also be a hassle to even have a charger handy. If you are walking around with a toolbelt only, you are probably not carrying a drill and an impact driver, but near the workbench I have several.
            On a tool where you don't change bits or blades very often, is the speed/ease of that change all that important?
            Trying to make a tool that is everything to everyone is at best a compromise and at worst a useless gimmick.....economics and marketing at work.

            It's kind of like the old debate surrounding mechanic's tools. If you never break your Craftsman wrenches, you don't see the "need" for Snap-On, Mac, etc......regardless of the debate that the older models of those tools were better than the new stuff too.

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            • #7
              Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

              Professional grade is a relative term.
              Craftsman, ryobi and their numerous clones are NOT pro. Hitachi is a few steps above them, but I think falls short of pro.
              I've not seen anything from milwaukee that could be considered anything but pro. Makita makes very little that is not pro. Makers like dewalt, porter cable make some pro stuff, but they also make a ton of crap.
              www.TheWoodCellar.com

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              • #8
                Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                The germans!!!!Fein,Festool and AEG!!!!
                You can never have enough drills-too many is just enough!!!!!

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                • #9
                  Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                  Stihl?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                    WRIGHT brand sockets are great if you can find them. This is especially so for their impact sockets.

                    They are made in Barberton, Ohio using 4140 alloy hot forged steel and are very well machined and tempered.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                      Ridgids commercial plumbing power tool line is still cranking out extremely durable tools.Tools that more than likely last as long as you need'em.

                      Skil mag 77
                      Makita impacts
                      Dewalt 2 speed right angle
                      Hilti Line power tools also powder actuated line
                      Stihl quick saw
                      Husky chainsaws

                      If you shop around the Germans make a sweet portable band saw,it was a few years ago so I forgot the name.I'll never use it as I more than likely won't have such a detail on the corbles of my house

                      Still lots of tools out there,Your just not going to find too many of them in the isles of home depot.Just kidding

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                      • #12
                        Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                        Hilti used to make power tools that were nearly indestructable...

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                        • #13
                          Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                          Got a buddy working the new Hilti impact gun in the field putting cast iron pipe together. Says has a "New love in his life"

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                          • #14
                            Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                            Jancy makes the best magnetic drill press on the market. I have yet to kill anything Milwaukee, and pro Makita tools are different then home crepo stuff.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Do you think "professional" grade power tools still exist?

                              yes there are but you have to look for them most of dewalts stuff is good

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