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Hand Tool Question "SAE"

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  • Hand Tool Question "SAE"

    Because we don't have a section for hand tools I figure it may as well go under Open Discussion. Anyway here is the question. When referring to hand tools, what does "SAE" stand for? I know the answer but do any of you know it. What would really be a better way to describe the hand tool rather than saying SAE?

    If no one answers correctly what SAE is soon then I'll post the answer under this thread. I'll also post what I think might be a better way to describe the basic hand tools rather than saying SAE.

    Hint: It's S. A. E. and not a three letter word like sae.

  • #2
    Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

    I think it stands for Society of Automotive Engineers.

    I learned it back in Vo/Tech. college 22 years ago.

    I've never heard of referring to hand tools as S.A.E. though, other than referring to sockets, wrenches, allen wrenches, etc. that aren't metric.

    Tracy
    .

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

      dang it, you beat me. GRRRRRRrrrrrrrrr
      9/11/01, never forget.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

        Yasudaplumbing has it correct

        Some tool companies refer to SAE in relation to opening sizes. A more proper way would be to call the tools "Fractional Inch" sized. I'm sure that OSC knew this too and especially with his being into trucking.

        Long ago the S.A.E. figured out specifications for fasteners used for the automotive industry in the USA. Needless to say they have been used on many types of machinery.


        Time for old Woussko to go back to making ZZZs.
        Last edited by Woussko; 12-04-2007, 05:52 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

          I use the term only when referring to the sizes. ie "Hey... is that SAE or metric?"

          I suppose some people still say "standard or metric" but around here, metric IS standard.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

            An abridged history of SAE
            http://www.sae.org/about/history.htm

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...7/ai_n14824056

            AUTOMOTIVE PROTOCOLS & STANDARDS

            Nash, Tom
            Technicians work with SAE standards every day. But where do these standards come from, and what do those numbers mean?

            From its very beginning in 1905, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) recognized the need for standardization. Automakers of the day were small firms that purchased components and parts from suppliers, then assembled the pieces. When these vehicles were sold by independent dealers around the country, repairing them (and they needed a lot!) became very difficult because the exact parts were hard or impossible to find without going back to the original manufacturer of the car or part.

            Many car companies in those days created the fittings, like motor mounts, connecting pieces and finishing materials themselves in order to put all the purchased components together. The quality of the finished motorcar was only as good as the quality of the sum of the parts. If an automaker changed suppliers, improved parts or-worse yet-went out of business, those specific replacement parts could become unavailable. Many local blacksmiths and mechanics were pressed into service to adapt, alter or modify parts to make the vehicle usable again.

            An editorial in the Scientific American of Jan. 16, 1909, stated: "Standardization and interchangeability of parts will have the effect of giving us a higher grade of motorcar at a lower price, but this is dependent to a considerable degree upon the production of one model in great numbers and elimination of extensive annual changes in design that necessitate the making of costly jigs, gauges, and special machinery."

            Industry leaders began calling for standards for threads, pipes, spark plugs and other components. Finally, in 1912, the SAE issued its first standards under the direction of the organization's president, Howard Coffin. He had stated in the association's monthly newsletter that the lack of standardized components "was responsible for nine-tenths of the production troubles and most of the needless expense entailed in the manufacture of motorcars." The Standards Committee was headed by Henry Souther, an MIT graduate and noted engineer.

            Over the next few years, the Standards Committee set several standards for materials, lubricants, fittings, fasteners and components. One great example was lock washers. At the time, more than 300 types were being used in the industry. By following an SAE standard, this number was reduced by nearly 90%. By 1921, more than 200 sets of SAE standards were credited with an industrywide savings of over $750 million, or 15% of the retail value of all vehicles sold.

            Standardization really began more than a hundred years earlier, in the arms industry. Governments purchased muskets and cannons from companies who made them under contract, to specifications. The military wanted to be able to repair weapons quickly and accurately in the field, and interchangeable parts was the only answer.

            The courses of military history and the automobile crossed in 1916 when the U.S. Dept. of Defense, which was preparing to enter World War I, asked the automobile industry and the SAE to form a coalition to build a standardized vehicle. It became known as the Liberty Truck, and it was powered by a standardized engine-the Liberty Engine.

            The automobile industry went to war for the first time in a coordinated effort. Various manufacturers were pressed into service to supply Liberty Engines and Liberty Trucks, all of which were made to the same standards and specifications. Repair and maintenance of these vehicles was simplified because a smaller number of parts was needed. This scenario would be repeated and refined during World War II.

            Today, the standards written by SAE committees cover every aspect of automotive manufacture and repair, including the tools used to make those repairs. From simple wrenches to sophisticated electronic diagnostic and programming equipment, the parameters are guided by standards put in place by the SAE.

            The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is a network of the national standards institutes of 151 countries (one member per country), with a Central Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland, that coordinates the system. ISO is a nongovernmental organization; its members are not, as in the case of the United Nations, delegations of national governments. They come from the private sector, having been set up by national partnerships of industry associations. Both the SAE and ISO have collaborated to create global standards.
            (note: for more information and standards go to the url above. which I did not quote.)

            For further information, technical papers outlining all current SAE standards are available online from the Society of Automotive Engineers at www.sae.org. The Mobile Air Conditioning Society Worldwide offers valuable information on its website at www.macsw.org.

            Visit www.motor.com to download a free copy of this article.

            Copyright Hearst Business Publishing Jul 2005
            Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning Company. All rights Reserved
            Last edited by BHD; 12-04-2007, 08:49 AM.
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

              Call me an old grunt if you like but I like to refer to sizes of hand tools as either being fractional inch or metric. Normally I just state the size and am done. I can see it now where we do up fractional inch sizes but as metric sizes.

              Example: A 9/16 inch combination wrench is marked as being 14.287 mm - I think maybe to make it simple it could be called a 14.3 mm wrench.

              I really wish the USA had converted to the metric system years ago. I also can't stand fractions all day. I like to use decimal inches so I can add or subtract with less *&^%$# of the old brain what's left of it.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

                just for the fun it, take a look at the different sizes of taps, from, MSC

                http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNPDFF...0&PMT4TP=*LTIP

                If the link does not work, http://www1.mscdirect.com/ and open up the catalog, on pages 276, 277, 278, and then 279, these are the "standard" page 279 are a page of non standard that and I know that where are more non standard than that, and this is beside metric, these are the inch sizes,

                and as the above post, stating that a one time more than 300 different types of locking washers were being made, even one was doing there own thing.
                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

                  I am a Canadian living in Phoenix...
                  Just to annoy my co-workers I refer to measurements as either metric or imperial...
                  Imperial being the old british system of feet and inches...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

                    Markts,

                    While that may work for linear dimensions, if I recall correctly, "Imperial" is different than U.S. measurements in many other areas. For instance, pressure in the U.S. is in PSI or PSI, gaged (PSIG). In the UK, I believe it's kg/cm2 and in much of Europe it's in "Pascals" and in France it's in "bars" (or is it the other way around?). I think the ISO standard settled on "bars".

                    I know the company that I used to work for spent years trying to go metric, but today, much of it is still in U.S. decimal measurements.

                    CWS

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                    • #11
                      Re: Hand Tool Question "SAE"

                      BHD

                      Sometime look up this company that makes taps and nothing but. They can custom make about any tap you can dream about!!! The cost for such is high but they shelf stock some pretty wild ones. MSC has a warehouse about 15 minutes from their factory in PA and does special orders with them all the time. I have a few of their taps that were standard diameters with with wild thread pitches. One is the spark plug size for antique John Deere 2 cylinder engines. It's 7/8-18 with an H4 thread limit size meaning it's 0.002 inches over. For a 7/8" tap that's pretty common. I don't own any older tractors but have helped a few people work on them. This same tap was used for the spark plug in older Gravely 2 wheel garden tractors made before about 1965 or so. That's where I really got to use it.

                      Reiff & Nestor Co.
                      West St.
                      Lykens, PA 17048
                      Phone: 717-453-7113, 800-521-3422 (toll free)
                      Fax: 717-453-7555
                      http://www.rntap.com

                      Manufacturer of taps.
                      Employees: 200-499
                      Activity: Manufacturer

                      Special note: Far too many special dies and taps are coming over from Asia. I detest such and want mine made in North America.

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