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  • #46
    Re: I am scared

    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
    nice try, but i caught your blunder

    rick.
    Apparently, you didn't know what I meant
    I love my plumber

    "My Hero"

    Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

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    • #47
      Re: I am scared

      Originally posted by MrsSeatDown View Post
      Apparently, you didn't know what I meant
      Apparently his reading comprehension is a little slow as well.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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      • #48
        Re: I am scared

        Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
        Apparently his reading comprehension is a little slow as well.

        Mark
        Oh Mark! I now wish I hadn't promised to stop teasing
        I love my plumber

        "My Hero"

        Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

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        • #49
          Re: I am scared

          Originally posted by MrsSeatDown View Post
          Oh Mark! I now wish I hadn't promised to stop teasing
          Thank goodness only one of us made the promise.

          Mark
          Last edited by ToUtahNow; 05-07-2008, 12:51 AM.
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: I am scared

            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
            I'd like to add that while I do not excuse the attitude of some students and parents to blame teachers for their own failures, the problem is more complicated. Because of the present economy there are folks who had no intention or desire to become teachers, taking teaching positions because of some unexpected situation. There is also the problem of standardized testing and no child left behind which is forcing teachers to prepare students to pass certain tests rather than really teach the course properly. In our *** backwards society students reflect a dysfunctional home life and school environment as well. Yes, there are still good teachers, students and parents, but I think there are more and more problems within those groups. I'd like to think we could get back to basics and have better marriages, stable jobs, students with better skills to function is society, but what are the chances of that happening? Is the Camelot of the American dream, the family unit and what once made America great gone for good? I know that for some here the dream is alive and very strong. I wish that more of you find that dream and hold onto it during these difficult times.
            I think the stable familiy unit is the most important thing, and also that a stable work ethic as an example to kids is probably the second most important thing.

            I'm going to disagree with you on teachers and testing though. As far as teachers, it does depend on the district; it can pay pretty well, but more importantly it is a very stable job with government benefits. That is pretty attractive to some people. I don't like No-Child-Left-Behind because I don't think that the federal government should be involved in education; if they mess it up they mess up 50 states worth. If NYS messes it up, only NY students are hurt, CA students would be OK and vice versa. I actually think that standardized tests are important, NY does it in high school for most everything now with Regents. Without having some standardized tests, you can't evaluate what teachers are successfully teaching the students. You may argue that it has people teach to the test, but if the test is testing things that are important (like math, reading comprehension, etc.); I would argue that teaching to the test is not a bad thing. It is certainly better than the alternative of not knowing whether a particular student is achieving what they need to; or differentiating the teachers who get their students to achieve vs. those who don't.

            The earlier you catch children who are underachieving (and also those that are overachieving), the better you can do for them in the long run.

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            • #51
              Re: I am scared

              I've recently become involved in our Lion's Club "Leos" Club, which is composed of High School kids. I'm really impressed with this crop of young'uns. They are helpful, respectful, and smart. They know what work is, and appreciate what it takes to make a living. This is a voluntary group, so we're getting only those that want to join. That being said, it seems to be a popular choice for the kids. I'm really kind of surprised by these kids. They're a lot more on the ball than I remember myself being at their age! I keep reminding them they're responsible for keeping me in Medicare and Social Security checks so they better get good jobs.

              As far as the actual start of this thread....I've had to learn how to read micrometers and calipers. It seems such a simple thing to begin with, but it's taken me at least a year to feel comfortable around a pair of calipers. Now, though, I use them regularly. It seems I'm not ever without my calipers in the shop these days. I guess when I grew up, teaching girls how to work with mechanical systems wasn't a priority. I was never shown the details of measurement systems in my HS shop class. The "home ec" class, however, taught us the details of how much a 1/4 cup of flour weighed and how to make conversions between dry weight and volume of most items in the kitchen. While that's useful (I prefer dry weight over volume for flour and most other dry goods), right now I wish the shop teacher had bothered to spend more time with the calipers!
              I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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              • #52
                Re: I am scared

                Originally posted by cpw View Post
                I think the stable familiy unit is the most important thing, and also that a stable work ethic as an example to kids is probably the second most important thing.

                I'm going to disagree with you on teachers and testing though. As far as teachers, it does depend on the district; it can pay pretty well, but more importantly it is a very stable job with government benefits. That is pretty attractive to some people. I don't like No-Child-Left-Behind because I don't think that the federal government should be involved in education; if they mess it up they mess up 50 states worth. If NYS messes it up, only NY students are hurt, CA students would be OK and vice versa. I actually think that standardized tests are important, NY does it in high school for most everything now with Regents. Without having some standardized tests, you can't evaluate what teachers are successfully teaching the students. You may argue that it has people teach to the test, but if the test is testing things that are important (like math, reading comprehension, etc.); I would argue that teaching to the test is not a bad thing. It is certainly better than the alternative of not knowing whether a particular student is achieving what they need to; or differentiating the teachers who get their students to achieve vs. those who don't.

                The earlier you catch children who are underachieving (and also those that are overachieving), the better you can do for them in the long run.
                Unfortunatly there are many teachers that truley do not want to know how their students are testing because the results often uncover defficiencies in their teaching methods. but the fact remains that without standardized tests there is no way to gauge a childs progress. for over 30 years now math teachers have been trying new methods and programs to try to make math easier and more "fun". The results have been a disaster. Educators need to come to the realization that some things just are not fun. Multiplication tables and basic formulas are best learned at an early age through rote memorization. (beat it into the brain) Without the basic math foundation, advanced math is well beyond most students ability.
                sigpic

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                • #53
                  Re: I am scared

                  There isn't much that bothers me more than the education system, at least in New York State.

                  Teachers: One of the first things teachers do after securing a position is begin to whine about salary. Well... You know what? If you are so stupid that you didn't investigate whether or not you could make ends meet with your salary you are too stupid to teach. Go try to get a job in the private sector Mr. Ten Week Summer Vacation.

                  Respect: I was part of a research project which involved inner-city elementary school kids. A kindergartner, upset over something, grabbed a handfull of caryons and threw them into the face of the principal who was investigating a different incident that involved the same kid. If there is no respect for persons there can be no respect for the subjects which are taught.

                  Responsibility: As a psychotherapist working for a not-for-profit I had the opportunity to hear of some of the most bone chilling incidents you can imagine. Parental involvement is the single most important factor influencing childrens' success in school. There are a number of factors that contribute to lack of parental involvement in children's education, both moral and school specific, not the least of which is exhaustion. It was not uncommon to have a single mother with a few kids, working two or three jobs all paying minimum wage, as a client. It is a testament to the clients' strengths that they are ableto function at all to say nothing of teaching respect and morality. These parents understand the responsibility and benefits of involvement in education but it is literally impossible for them to be involved. They have to work so they and their kids can eat, so that they can pay the rent etc. Sometime they have to make room in their schedule for sleep.

                  Accountibility versus Responsibility: If you teach a dog to fight and the dog breaks loose and bites someone is the dog responsible? I would submit no. The person who taught the dog to fight is responsible. Is the dog accountable? You bet, and he, through no fault of his own, will suffer the consequences. Where does the responsibility lie with the kid who threw the crayons in the face of the principal? It is certain the kid will be held accountable.
                  Last edited by Tom W; 05-07-2008, 08:37 AM.

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                  • #54
                    Re: I am scared

                    Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                    As far as the actual start of this thread....I've had to learn how to read micrometers and calipers. It seems such a simple thing to begin with, but it's taken me at least a year to feel comfortable around a pair of calipers. Now, though, I use them regularly. It seems I'm not ever without my calipers in the shop these days. I guess when I grew up, teaching girls how to work with mechanical systems wasn't a priority. I was never shown the details of measurement systems in my HS shop class. The "home ec" class, however, taught us the details of how much a 1/4 cup of flour weighed and how to make conversions between dry weight and volume of most items in the kitchen. While that's useful (I prefer dry weight over volume for flour and most other dry goods), right now I wish the shop teacher had bothered to spend more time with the calipers!
                    Our high school had neither shop nor home economics. I don't know how to use a pair of calipers, but I do know how to convert between the various kitchen measurements.

                    I don't think whether or not a kid knows how to use calipers is really an issue. The real issue is that none of them knew how to add, multiply, or maybe as likely [and as problematic] was willing to participate in class.

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