Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
American Auto Industry Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Re: American Auto Industry

    hear,hear

    Comment


    • #47
      Re: American Auto Industry

      http://www.reuters.com/article/marke...0081114?rpc=44






      Looks like a going out of business sale happening real soon.




      Shows you right up front if congress has to ask them to come to them and cut executive salaries.....


      they want money and still pay the top brass the same.


      What really would happen if they went under? Anything major?

      Of course a lot of people would be out of a job.......but there's already 10 million.....


      what's a few million more going to hurt at this point....really.


      Another guy was telling me today how "wasteful" those workers are on those assembly lines. All in the name of unions.
      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

      Comment


      • #48
        Re: American Auto Industry

        I am ready for anything at this point...unemployment hits 10%...I won't be surprised. It will suck bigtime, but we have been setting ourselves up for this for a long time. Everyone thought they could live off of credit forever. In the end, someone has to pony up the money.
        Foreclosures, business failures, layoffs....we are finally 'paying' our debts.
        Water Heater Reviews & Water Heater Information

        Comment


        • #49
          Re: American Auto Industry

          Advanta (Credit Card Company) is charging me 35% interest, without warning with a high credit score rating. It's a legal molestation/rape of my income producing abilities. It's my obligation now to make sure I get my monies worth that I get the message out to make sure other victims aren't created.

          Must be the Union!!

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: American Auto Industry

            I can't speak with knowledge of the wastefulness of union auto workers or the efficiency of the salaried work force. But I suspect it may be a lot like some other "Union" shops.

            In the company that I worked for 30 years we had a union shop. It was a necessity, given the crap that the management would pull. Just exibitions of stupidity on both sides at times but it often appeared that the "Us and Them" mentality was counter-productive all the way around.

            It most always appeared to be that anything with the Union took forever, but at the same time, you could rarely get a proper appraisal of any situation with the management and I've know far too many Salaried guys who never seemed to have anything to do.

            Over thirty years it was quite surprising who would survive the many layoffs and all too often the politics of business drove many very productive salied guys out the door. Likewise, if you had a goofoff in the Union, it was impossible to get of him. Too much "protectiveness" on the Union side.

            Over a three year period in the late 90's I had the opportunity to be an instructor of our Total Quality program. I volunteered to work with the third shift because I really did not know any of the workers there and at that time period, I'd have NO salaried employees.

            It proved to be a real "eye-opener" and in the end I had a better understanding of the problems faced by far too many Union employees. It's tough and the issues that many Union members face is often difficult enough to make me wonder how they could drag themselves into the shop every day.

            One of frailties (sp?) of our business was watching the layoff's hit during the Christmas season. Odd time I used to think but after my initial years at the plant, I learned that the layoffs hit at that time, as a matter of design. You see, as the year hit it's last quarter the management started worrying about their bonuses... which are based on their projected shipping numbers. So to make "the numbers" managment would often pull up orders from the first quarter of the next year. That way they could put the shops on overtime in November and early December and once the "numbers" were made, they'd can the workers! That way, they got their bonuses and the workers got the shaft... going on unemployment during the holiday season and well into the new year.

            In the auto industry, it's not the Union that designs the car, makes the decisions on the models or types of vehicles it produces or decide to push on to the public. They don't decide the size, efficiency, options, or anything else and they sure don't do the marketing and sales. Likewise, they don't walk away with the bonuses that the "deciders" do either.

            However, they do take the heat when the product fails, they are the first to be layed off, and they are mostly the ones who get blamed for the high cost. It's pretty much a good bet that the management team will walk away with a bonus, even if the model fails, or the industry fails.

            It's certainly not totally the fault of the management or the Union, but it's the management that decides the model and it's the management that governs the marketing.

            CWS

            Comment


            • #51
              Re: American Auto Industry

              That link came from Drudge Report...and that wasn't even up for 3 hours last night.

              I'm curious to know what caused that abrupt removal....?
              Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

              Comment


              • #52
                Re: American Auto Industry

                Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                A word on the economic hybrids and plugins, we are still sharing our roads with plenty of Suvs's Ford Excursions, Chevy Sububans, etc. While the tiny cars are economical , they are dead meat in a clash with one of the big vehicles. Something to consider.
                Will they take all the 18 wheel trucks, school busses, and other large vehicles off the road? I think not so I don't see it making much difference. Eventually those big old boats will fade away just as the 7000 lb behemoths of the 60s and 70s did.
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                Comment


                • #53
                  Re: American Auto Industry

                  Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                  Will they take all the 18 wheel trucks, school busses, and other large vehicles off the road? I think not so I don't see it making much difference. Eventually those big old boats will fade away just as the 7000 lb behemoths of the 60s and 70s did.
                  I agree that a transition will have to take place, I just wanted to throw that out there as a talking point. I know truckers and school bus drivers have there share of problem drivers, but I would still feel better sharing the roads in a smaller vehcile with them instead of the soccer Moms speeding in SUV's with a cell phone plastered to their heads.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Re: American Auto Industry

                    instead of the soccer Moms speeding in SUV's with a cell phone plastered to their heads
                    But its not just soccer Moms, and I understand you were
                    using that just as an example and not laying it all on them.



                    Here is some interesting reading about foreign and American made vehicles.

                    http://www.howtobuyamerican.com/cont...db-autos.shtml
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                    ---------
                    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Re: American Auto Industry

                      The incentive bidding i not limited to just the auto industry. The same thing happens with large stores like Costco, Walmart or Cabelas. Incredible amounts of money are given in incentives to bring jobs and tax dollars into areas. When given a choice between buying prime property with no incentives in one area versus free land and million of incentives in another area the choice is pretty simple.

                      Mark
                      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: American Auto Industry

                        Agree Mark, and many Mid-Atlantic and New England states saw the same thing happen 30 years ago when all their local manufacturing went South, but only after the bled the local governments dry stringing them along with promises to stay if they cut property taxes and gave them other incentives.

                        A large and well known glass manufacturer operated one of their oldest and biggest bottle plants not far from for about 100 years. This area produced much of the ketchup for Heinz, Ritter and Hunts (tomatoes being a big crop in the area counties), and had bottling plants for 7-up, Coke, Pepsi, and others close by and they made bottles for all of them. They employed close to a third of the city work force, about 3500 people. In the early 80s they threatened to move saying they couldn't be competitive working from there any longer. The city took their taxes to ZERO for five years and gave them incentives to get them to stay. The glass plant took the tax cut for 5 years and then left anyway, leaving behind a toxic mess on a 100+ acres site in the middle of the city that is still in the process of being cleaned up, and an unemployment rate (for the city) that jumped to 24% when the plant closed.
                        ---------------
                        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                        ---------------
                        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                        ---------
                        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                        ---------
                        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X