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  • Hey, where did they go??

    25 Things About to Go Extinct in America

    25. Pit Toilets. By the 2000 Census, the number of Americans who lacked indoor plumbing was down to 0.6%.

    24. Yellow Pages. This year will be pivotal for the global Yellow Pages industry. One research firm predicts the falloff in usage of newspapers and print Yellow Pages could even reach 10% this year.

    23. Classified Ads. The Internet has made so many things obsolete that newspaper classified ads might sound like just another trivial item on a long list.

    22. Movie Rental Stores. While Netflix is looking up at the moment, Blockbuster keeps closing store locations by the hundreds.

    21. Dial-up Internet Access. Dial-up connections have fallen from 40% in 2001 to 10% in 2008. The combination of an infrastructure to accommodate affordable high speed Internet connections and the disappearing home phone have all but pounded the final nail in the coffin of dial-up Internet access.

    20. Phone Land lines. According to a survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, at the end of 2007, nearly one in six homes was cell-only and, of those homes that had land lines.

    19. Chesapeake Bay Blue Crabs. Maryland's icon, the blue crab, has been fading away in Chesapeake Bay . Last year Maryland saw the lowest harvest (22 million pounds) since 1945. Just four decades ago the bay produced 96 million pounds.

    18. VCRs. For the better part of three decades, the VCR was a best-seller and staple in every American household until being completely decimated by the DVD, and now the Digital Video Recorder (DVR).

    17. Ash Trees. In the late 1990's, a pretty, irridescent green species of beetle, now known as the emerald ash borer, hitched a ride to North America with ash wood products imported from eastern Asia . In less than a decade, its larvae have killed millions of trees in the Midwest , and continue to spread.

    16. Ham Radio. Amateur radio operators enjoy personal (and often worldwide) wireless communications with each other and are able to support their communities with emergency and disaster communications if necessary, while increasing their personal knowledge of electronics and radio theory. However, proliferation of the Internet and its popularity among youth has caused the decline of amateur radio.

    15. The Swimming Hole. Thanks to our litigious society, swimming holes are becoming a thing of the past. ' 20/20' reports that swimming hole owners, like Robert Every in High Falls , N. Y., are shutting them down out of worry that if someone gets hurt they'll sue.

    14. Answering Machines. The increasing disappearance of answering machines is directly tied to No. 20 our list -- the decline of land lines.

    13. Cameras That Use Film. It doesn't require a statistician to prove the rapid disappearance of the film camera in America . Just look to companies like Nikon, the professional's choice for quality camera equipment. In 2006, it announced that it would stop making film cameras, pointing to the shrinking market -- only 3% of its sales in 2005.

    12. Incandescent Bulbs. Before a few years ago, the standard 60-watt (or, yikes, 100-watt) bulb was the mainstay of every U.S. home. With the green movement and all-things-sustainable-energy crowd, the Compact Fluorescent Light bulb (CFL) is largely replacing the older, Edison-era incandescent bulb.

    11. Stand-Alone Bowling Alleys. US claims there are still 60 million Americans who bowl at least once a year, but many are not bowling in stand-alone bowling alleys.

    10. The Milkman. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in 1950, over half of the milk delivered was to the home in quart bottles, by 1963, it was about a third and by 2001, it represented only 0.4% percent.

    9. Hand-Written Letters. In 2006, the Radicati Group estimated that, worldwide, 183 billion e-mails were sent each day. Two million each second. By November of 2007, an estimated 3.3 billion Earthlings owned cell phones, and 80% of the world's population had access to cell phone coverage.

    8. Wild Horses. It is estimated that 100 years ago, as many as two million horses were roaming free within the United States . In 2001, National Geographic News estimated that the wild horse population had decreased to about 50,000 head. Currently, the National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory board states that there are 32,000 free roaming horses in ten Western states, with half of them residing in Nevada .

    7. Personal Checks. According to an American Bankers Assoc. report, a net 23% of consumers plan to decrease their use of checks over the next two years, while a net 14% plan to increase their use of PIN debit. Checks continue to be the most commonly used bill payment method, with 71% of consumers paying at least one recurring bill per month by writing a check.

    6. Drive-in Theaters. During the peak in 1958, there were more than 4,000 drive-in theaters in this country, but in 2007 only 405 drive-ins were still operating. Exactly zero new drive-ins have been built since 2005.

    5. Mumps & Measles. Despite what's been in the news lately, the measles and mumps actually, truly are disappearing from the United States . In 1964, 212,000 cases of mumps were reported in the U.S. By 1983, this figure had dropped to 3,000, thanks to a vigorous vaccination program.

    4. Honey Bees. Perhaps nothing on our list of disappearing America is so dire - plummeting so enormously - and so necessary to the survival of our food supply as the honey bee. Very scary. 'Colony Collapse Disorder,' or CCD, has spread throughout the U..S. and Europe over the past few years, wiping out 50% to 90% of the colonies of many beekeepers -- and along with it, their livelihood.

    3. News Magazines and TV News. While the TV evening newscasts haven't gone anywhere over the last several decades, their audiences have. In 1984, in a story about the diminishing returns of the evening news, the New York Times reported that all three network evening-news programs combined had only 40.9 million viewers.

    2. Analog TV. According to the Consumer Electronics Association, 85% of homes in the U.S. get their television programming through cable or satellite providers. For the remaining 15% or 13 million individuals who are using rabbit ears or a large outdoor antenna to get their local stations, change is in the air.

    1. The Family Farm. Since the 1930's, the number of family farms has been declining rapidly. According to the USDA, 5.3 million farms dotted the nation in 1950, but this number had declined to 2.1 million by the 2003 farm census (data from the 2007 census hasn't yet been published). Ninety-one percent of the U.S. farms are small family farms.

    I had to trim many of the comments to fit the character limit of the post, so I created a PDF of the full text.

    Name:  a26eeda52d460529ebd7d68c69180f52.pdf
Views: 1
Size:  46.6 KB
    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

  • #2
    Re: Hey, where did they go??

    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
    [COLOR=black]
    23. Classified Ads. The Internet has made so many things obsolete that newspaper classified ads might sound like just another trivial item on a long list.
    The local classified paper still seems to be the best way to get a babysitter though.

    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
    22. Movie Rental Stores. While Netflix is looking up at the moment, Blockbuster keeps closing store locations by the hundreds.
    I use Netflix, but I would think that the $1 a day rental kiosks in the supermarket would be just as big a threat. You can probably titles that a account for a very large portion of Blockbuster's volume without nearly the fixed costs.

    21. Dial-up Internet Access. Dial-up connections have fallen from 40% in 2001 to 10% in 2008. The combination of an infrastructure to accommodate affordable high speed Internet connections and the disappearing home phone have all but pounded the final nail in the coffin of dial-up Internet access.
    Poor JC!

    20. Phone Land lines. According to a survey from the National Center for Health Statistics, at the end of 2007, nearly one in six homes was cell-only and, of those homes that had land lines.
    This doesn't even consider VoIP like Vonage and Optimum Voice.


    16. Ham Radio. Amateur radio operators enjoy personal (and often worldwide) wireless communications with each other and are able to support their communities with emergency and disaster communications if necessary, while increasing their personal knowledge of electronics and radio theory. However, proliferation of the Internet and its popularity among youth has caused the decline of amateur radio.
    This mirrors my experience. I still have a license, but haven't done anything with it in years; because it was cool when I was 12 and the Internet didn't exist in its current form; but by the time I was 16 the Internet had taken over my interest.

    12. Incandescent Bulbs. Before a few years ago, the standard 60-watt (or, yikes, 100-watt) bulb was the mainstay of every U.S. home. With the green movement and all-things-sustainable-energy crowd, the Compact Fluorescent Light bulb (CFL) is largely replacing the older, Edison-era incandescent bulb.
    The CFLs don't come in enough funny shapes quite yet (like chandelier). Maybe we'll end up wating for LEDs.

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