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RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

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  • RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

    Hello everyone,

    Want to catch up with the group. Sure seems like you work more/harder when times are tough. Anyway, two things for general consumption.

    One, we have a Twitter account with a user name of RIDGIDtoday. I post general stuff here, to include some product updates and even some sneak preview announcements on upcoming product launches. You'll see that we are just getting started. If anyone wants to follow, please feel free to let me know the kind of topics/updates you'd like to see.

    www.twitter.com/ridgidtoday

    Two, we did a survey on high school students and their interest in the trades. Thought the group might be interested, especially since some of you know one of the guys quoted.

    http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/s...s,704131.shtml

    Hope everyone is doing well (economy discounted of course.)

  • #2
    Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

    Hello ProBrand,

    Thanks for that info about twitter, I will be sure to check it out.

    The survey sounds interesting too, I will read that also.

    Bob D.
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
    ---------
    sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

      who the heck is this guy

      “The problem with kids not pursuing a career in the skilled trades is largely because they are not introduced to it,” said Mark Yochim, licensed Plumbing Contractor and owner of Mark A. Yochim and Associates. “When I was in school 40 years ago, you could pick up a class in industrial arts and get a feel for working with tools. Today, kids don’t have that opportunity.”

      40 years ago, joey wasn't even born

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

        Do you Twitter / Twatter....whatever?

        Since IT IS getting popular.....I decided to code this.

        Anyhow, I just wiped up this code to display "Real Time" Plumbing issues!

        You might find what I just coded interesting

        http://tweeter.wetheadmedia.com/

        I am adding more "tags" as I go , ( update daily)

        For example:

        Tag: Ridgid

        http://tweeter.wetheadmedia.com/tag/ridgid

        Tag:

        Tankless Water Heaters:

        http://tweeter.wetheadmedia.com/tag/...-water-heaters

        Etc etc



        ENJOY!!!

        Attached Files
        Last edited by PlumbingSkool; 03-21-2009, 05:25 PM.
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        • #5
          Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

          I think young people dont have any interest in skilled trades because its work.I dont think lack of exposure is the problem.Its easier to push a button than it is to turn a wrench and if your pushing the button you stay clean.People in general dont seem to want to work hard anymore especially young people.Everybody wants to make good money but very few want to EARN good money.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

            As a vocational technical instructor, the article and survey comes as no surprise. We have been seeing a steady decline in student applications for years now as the academic emphasis at the high school level has shifted twards college prep curriculum. The notion that all students are suited to college is of course false. Numbers say that roughly 80% of all college applicants wash out after the first year. However the high schools are hell bent on enrolling as many in college as possible because it makes their numbers look better and funding is tied to numbers. The drop out rate for post secondary technical education is much much lower. That is because students enrolled in those programs tend to have a specific career and goal in mind as opposed to those entering college with no clue as to what they should major in, and therefore settle for a degree in liberal arts which of course prepares them to be a house painter. Vocational Technical schools at the high school and post secondary level need to do a better job at partnering with industry to promote the trades through advertising and marketing. One of the most time consuming and difficult aspects of running a CTE plumbing \ HVAC program is getting funding and donations from corporations. Most of us are working on fairly small annual budgets that cover consumeable items like pipe and fittings, but there is often not much money left over for tools and equipment. Our only source is the Perkins grant and the good will of industry and local business. Naturally when times are tough the flow slows to a trickle. Plumbing and HVAC are exciting, cutting edge, high paying trades that demand skill and academic excellence.
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: RIDGID, Twitter, and Press Releases

              Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
              As a vocational technical instructor, the article and survey comes as no surprise. We have been seeing a steady decline in student applications for years now as the academic emphasis at the high school level has shifted twards college prep curriculum. The notion that all students are suited to college is of course false. Numbers say that roughly 80% of all college applicants wash out after the first year. However the high schools are hell bent on enrolling as many in college as possible because it makes their numbers look better and funding is tied to numbers. The drop out rate for post secondary technical education is much much lower. That is because students enrolled in those programs tend to have a specific career and goal in mind as opposed to those entering college with no clue as to what they should major in, and therefore settle for a degree in liberal arts which of course prepares them to be a house painter. Vocational Technical schools at the high school and post secondary level need to do a better job at partnering with industry to promote the trades through advertising and marketing. One of the most time consuming and difficult aspects of running a CTE plumbing \ HVAC program is getting funding and donations from corporations. Most of us are working on fairly small annual budgets that cover consumeable items like pipe and fittings, but there is often not much money left over for tools and equipment. Our only source is the Perkins grant and the good will of industry and local business. Naturally when times are tough the flow slows to a trickle. Plumbing and HVAC are exciting, cutting edge, high paying trades that demand skill and academic excellence.
              Agreed and well put.

              I watched something recently (20/20 or something. I'll try to find/link it) where the head of an education study said something like if you weren't in the top 60%? of your graduating high school class-then it was a waste of time and money to attend college. Statistically speaking you wouldn't finish. Surprising. To me anyway.

              Another major thing is noone encourages their children to become a plumber, electrician, carpenter etc. None. I've never met one parent that did so. Even if they just "want them to be happy", they still encourage them to attend 4 year institutions and even discourage them from the aforementioned trades.

              http://abcnews.go.com/Business/Econo...6654468&page=1

              J.C.
              Last edited by BobsPlumbing; 03-21-2009, 10:32 PM. Reason: Found Link-Percentage Wrong

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