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Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

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  • Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

    There's actually 52 in that list, some you might agree or disagree with.



    Some of them I found quite disturbing, like the family farms and honey bees.

    The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.
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  • #2
    Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

    Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post



    The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.
    And what are you basing that on?

    This hits close to home.

    While that has happened and will continue to happen, it certainly is not the only reason.

    If that is your opinion, state it as such. If not, state sources for your information.

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    • #3
      Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

      How about common sense?

      Or did that vanish last year..?
      I'm on "The List" and I love it!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

        Originally posted by lmpg View Post
        And what are you basing that on?

        This hits close to home.

        While that has happened and will continue to happen, it certainly is not the only reason.

        If that is your opinion, state it as such. If not, state sources for your information.


        Of course it hits close to home, just like it did in my family.


        My grandparents? 79 acre farm that survived 3 generations, was passed on from one to the other until "my" generation thought the cash payout "under 200 grand which was insulting for its value" was sold because the heirs couldn't agree to let just one have it and let them pay out the value to others.

        It came down to credit and trust, which in this day and age with even family members, that doesn't exist.


        My other relatives up north, they have a 200 acre farm that from the way it looks at this point, the kids are realizing how much freaking work it takes to operate a farm, how expensive the equipment is to operate/maintain and these kids are pulling away from the idea because their parents haven't really "gained" from the average that's achieved from up and downs in the business.....then taking a rule across the board and seeing what they actually earned.

        Who knows...people aren't indebted to value of tradition like once was years ago. It would be high priority to keep the family name connected to the property. But thanks to developers and saweet large amounts of money...ahh hell my family would want what's best for me, sell it.


        My other uncle down south in Kentucky, he's 78 years old and some of the family members are surrounding him like vultures since his health is degrading. All a sudden they want to be part of that portfolio of being a name on a will when death enters the final stage of this property's ownership.

        From what I already know, the ones that are interested parties can't afford the property, even with their ability to be part of that initial stake in it.

        That's going to be an ugly situation because there's people taking care of this guy, "acting" like a family member for the completely wrong reasons.


        And that's just in my family and the last 15 years. He owns 82 acres...

        So I just mentioned damn near 400 acres of farmland that in just my living time is going to be completely removed from the family, forever, never going to come back as well.


        If I can beg off 400 acres just in my family alone, and the "vanishing" of the articles that proves what I already know, how much more proof do you need to know the obvious?

        I'd rather have that property ownership back in the family, but there's not a damn thing I can do about that. The moral fabric and family traditional values are never going to stay the way they were years ago.


        Perfect example:

        Went to a job yesterday where I was at the wrong address, not one but two property owners were outside and I asked them if they knew which house belonged to the property owners name.

        Neither one knew it, this is in a subdivision where you can count the bricks on the walls between them because they are so close together, and I was only one house up from both of them.

        And they didn't even know their neighbor's name, they've been living there for years.

        I can say the same almost for my neighbor 2 and 3 houses up on my street, and I can throw a rock and hit their house, I'm that close.
        Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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        • #5
          Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

          Maple syrup hits home with me since I love it on pancakes, waffles, french toast, right out of the bottle. Sure hop the price comes down and supplies increase.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

            Originally posted by tinmack View Post
            How about common sense?

            Or did that vanish last year..?


            Bubba-dee bub hah wha?


            I'm going to put a stick in a moving fan, or put my truck up on homemade ramps! I can do it man!
            Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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            • #7
              Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

              This one hits home for me. Yellow Pages.

              Or I should say hits wallet.

              http://www.walletpop.com/blog/2008/0...-yellow-pages/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                Lenny,

                I thought of you when reading that one.

                Ham radio is sad, but I perfectly understand it. I was into it when I was a kid (mostly packet), but once the Internet came along that is what became my passion.

                I think kids working for pocket money is one of the most important ones.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                  Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
                  There's actually 52 in that list, some you might agree or disagree with.



                  Some of them I found quite disturbing, like the family farms and honey bees.

                  The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.

                  I am going to play professional farmer here for a little while, and scold those who are not licensed in this area,

                  you find it easily to condemn the home owner for trying his had at plumbing when he has little know how of the workings or the mechanics of the trade and how it really is,

                  YOU make the statement
                  The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.
                  what was your price in 1974 for clearing a drain or for putting in some pipe or repairing some plumbing problem?

                  DO you know what the price of wheat or corn was IN 1974, the same as what it is to day,
                  yes that is right for 30+ years the prices have been flat and sideways, (chart speak), with very few peaks and most of those peaks are below the 1974 price, (I personally believe a lot of it is actually controlled by the government), very few other industries have a cabinet level government agency to control them.


                  who sets the price of meat corn wheat soybeans, it is not the farmer, it is the commodity traders, the farmer has nearly nothing to do with the prices he gets for his goods, but in the last 30+ years the prices of tractors has gone up 10 times, combines more than that,
                  trucks nearly 10 times, fertilizers and other inputs, much the same,

                  (in the 1980 I would buy a sack of seed corn for a Good TOP SEED NUMBER for $35 a bag, 80,0000 seeds in that bag, sold by the seed, cheap stuff for $15 or so, now a low cost bag of corn is over $100 and up to $300 for corns that have all the traits in them you may want),

                  but the price of grains have remains at the old 30 year old price, (yes in some areas the yields have gone up a little to make up some of the lack of cash prices, but as people see land as an investment the price of farm land has escalated as well and then the people who buy it want a cash lease on it to farm it, so the price of land either in purchase price or to rent it has gone up with ever thing else.

                  the price of corn to day at my local elevator is $3.60 for 54 pounds, a bushel and wheat is $4.97 for 60 pounds or a bushel of wheat,

                  I sell a bushel of wheat for under $5 that will make about 60 loves of bread, and according to NFU, a loaf of wonder bread, is selling for, $2,99 a loaf of one pound bread, I get a $.08 out of that loaf of bread, and when they raised the loaf of bread two winters ago for the "farmers charging to much" did you see the price drop when the price of wheat drop, no you did not, and you will not see, it drop either, but you will hear the cry of needing to increase the price next time there is a little spike in the wheat price.

                  this farm has been in my family over 100 years, my grandfather home steaded some of it,
                  my dad was born on this place and farmed it for many years and I am farming it now, but I really doubt if my son will ever farm it, when I started I was making money farming and gaining, then in about the mid 1990's they leveled out and now my goal is not to lose it,

                  my brother who took over his father in laws farm ended up selling nearly 1000 aces to get back on a better financial condition, (I do not know if he will survive or not).
                  (most farmers are operating on massive credit lines as there really is not the moneys being made to get out of debt, it looks good driving by, but many are just a crops lose from failure, and it is not poor management, it is not being pay fairly for what one produces).

                  and farming is a interesting business, it is not like most, first farmers pay retail for nearly all inputs, and get payed the wholesale price for there products,

                  when a farmer goes out of business, seldom does the "factory he has operated" go out of business, some one else comes in and produces,
                  so unlike in the car manufacturing if they are "over producing and a company fails, that leaves more of the pie for the other to get, not in farming, the amounts of product basically remains the same in production, just of of the farmers bit the dust not his plant,

                  the bigger the farm normally the farther the banks are to back them as in some situations they get so big the banks can't let them fail, as they may bring down the local banks, so they keep loaning them moneys, but the small farmer they shut down and sell out in a blink.

                  it is not the "greedy kids selling out" many times it is the only way to pay off the debts and to split up some of it as if mom and dad could not make it how are they going to make it, pay off the debits and sell off the land as there is not enough there to make a living in many instances, and build up the farm to keep it competitive,
                  Yes there are some who just see the money of the land and sell, but why would some one who is making good moneys else were want to come back to a small family farm and live nearly in poverty using 20 to 40 year old equipment to survive with? and some times it is the only way to split up the estate fairly, as if you split up the land there is no way one can make it most of the times.

                  in my area the average farmer has nearly 3000 to 4000 aces of farm able ground and that is not considered a large farm, here. in the last 10 years we have experienced severe drought in 2002 the corn got to 18" tall and tasseled out, on my place not one ear of corn was harvested that year, and most all of the corn crops were lost, we experience hail and other natural disasters, that take the crops,

                  Farming is not easy moneys nor is it easy to make a living on a small family farm,
                  (in my area, it cost over $120 of raw cost of just planting an acer of corn, (not harvest or any other possible spraying or other), just to plant, and that is not counting equipment cost, so the average yield of dry land corn in my area is about 60 on a good year, (I have had more 20 bushels an acre than 60's, do to hail and other.) OK the cost of corn here is $3.60 so I have to make 33 bushels just to pay for the planting cost harvest will normally cost another $25 an acer, so I need a yield of 40. to pay for the planting and the harvest, if it need to be sprayed for bug or other or additional fertilizers, you could easily get another $20 to $40 in it, so before I take home one dime I need a yield of 51 bushels an acer, and like I said that is (in our area) not that easy to do, may be one out of 6 years, (I do not grow corn any more as it cost to much for any guaranteed profit),
                  and you have interest and machine costs on top of that.
                  It is considered that 60 bushels an acer is break even for dry land corn in our area.


                  There is a reason why the family farm is disappearing
                  Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                  attributed to Samuel Johnson
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                    Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
                    There's actually 52 in that list, some you might agree or disagree with.



                    Some of them I found quite disturbing, like the family farms and honey bees.

                    The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.
                    I needed that for when i had the sales person for the yellow pages in my office trying to get me to sign up for the book. I tell him I want internet only and that in 10 years no one will even know what a yellow page book is. They know it but will not admit it.
                    You can lose with me, but you can't win without me!.... PPI

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                      BHD,


                      I knew there were farmers on this site, including you when I wrote my rant.

                      I understand the hardships of the farmer, believe me, their hardships are unimaginable for the efforts they put in.

                      I spent my childhood working on that 82 acre farm, every weekend practically because my uncle was disabled. He still worked, but the experience was awesome.

                      Just the mere effort for raising tobacco, the limitations set on tobacco base for weight, everthing from hot house seedings to transfer to planting, cultivation, spraying, cultivating, topping, cutting, hanging, then stripping, baling, then off to a far away town for $1.74 a pound?

                      You've got to be kidding me.


                      The relative that owns all that acreage up north? Bought a large machine that costs 1000's of dollars that since strong winds are common these days, it lifts corn stalks back up, so they can bear a crop.

                      I spent 2 years in the FFA, got my greenhand degree (glove with green paint on it ) the first year because of my desire to be in agriculture. Loved it, thought it was awesome, and my mother wanted me to get into the field.

                      But I didn't have a true interest knowing how much work, how little money went into the equation to produce a livelihood.

                      Me having to spend a half a day running across 4 counties to get corn feed in a large truck, having to tarp the load or lose half of it on the way, even with a small hole in the bed wasn't no fun. And I heard about it when I missed two holes in the bed and the center was sunk in when I brought it back. My uncle wasn't happy I gave it to the highway, one shredded piece at a time.

                      The family I have up north bought a machine that costs a 1/4 million dollars, and it's constantly breaking. I don't know what it is but I couldn't tell you how many weekends we came down to the farm to work the land, only to spend hours inside a garage or out in a field where the equipment failed, using slab jacks, large timbers, everything imaginable to make comfort of a bad situation.

                      If I had a dime for every time I've set tracks back on a D4 straight blade, I'd be filthy rich. You would not believe how many timbers and stones I've sunk into the soft earth because the weight of the dozer just does that.

                      We fixed/welded every bit of equipment that broke, modified it or created our own attachments to save a buck, even though we'd have substantial time in it.

                      I couldn't begin to count how many groundhogs I've shot long range with a rifle that would eat our cantelope crops every damn year.

                      I don't know how many acres I've topped tobacco, all I know is I have holes in my hands from years ago where I stabbed myself with the spear when cutting tobacco and staking it.

                      Setting the tobacco was the only pleasurable moment during this time in farming because the women would be half dressed because of the heat, and their bouncy chests in their tank tops made for comfort.

                      I got many stories to tell about my time on farms, but I'm sure I'm coming off as someone who doesn't know "farm life" and its hardships.

                      I truly do, and there's not enough tax breaks out there for farmers today to substantiate their existence.

                      My relative up north, close and on the way to Elyria said everything they purchase is up, all their returns on their crops is 20% down, possibly more.

                      That equation is pretty discouraging when you think about it. The hardships of farming have only gotten worse, not better over time.

                      Of course, technology has helped quite a few, but all at a cost.

                      I hope I've explained myself a little better that I've worked the land not by personal ownership....just by the weekend desire with my family to another family I called "ours".

                      I would like a penny for every bale of hay/straw that I've loaded on an open trailer and stacked to the rooftop of every barn I've been in.

                      And I wonder why my body is in such poor health. I live in an area of farmland that's being gobbled up and disappearing where I spent a lot of my teenage years making money on farms. Hard work, little pay but I enjoyed it.

                      Behind me sits a large farm that I pray to god the owners never sell. They work the land, have cattle and have some crops, prize chickens and other livestock. 5-8 horses used to run the field and it's a far enough distance that they looked like they was in slow motion. The beauty of it.

                      I'm driving the attitude that families at all costs should do whatever they should to preserve this history, whether or not they decide to work the land or figure out how to afford it.

                      You can't make land, that's a fact. I can't even begin to tell you how many large farms in my area have succombed to rolling subdivisions. I'd rather have the history back.
                      Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBING; 04-30-2009, 12:22 PM.
                      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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                      • #12
                        Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                        Cattle prices are the same today as from the '80's (and yes I have the sale tickets to prove it)

                        I grew up on a farm and I still live on the family farm. I only raise registered charolais cattle and bale hay on about 200 acres, have a few bee hive and raise a good sized garden. I have a pretty good job to support the farming hobby.

                        There is no money to be made in farming and I really dought that a young man could go out and buy a small farm (say 50 to 100 acres), fence it, put stock on it, buy a tractor and implements to put in and/or take off a crop, barn and out buildings, a house to live in, wife and kids, etc..............................and even think of breaking even by the time he dies. The only thing worth anything would be the land itself. Others who work at big high paying jobs have a retirement or 401K, the poor farmer has the land to sell for his retirement. The only way the little farms are still alive IS because they were handed down with some of the stock and equipment.

                        My dad was a construction engineer and farmed on the side and always had tenet farmers for help. He would let them have the tobacco money after expenses, so I know that game oh so well. I can remember when the tobbacco allotment was based on square footage or acreage, not the pounds. The extension agent would come out and measure your field of planted tobbacco and if it was over the area amount he would start chopping it down.
                        Grew vegitables for truck farming when I was in grade school, made good money for a kid.

                        G3

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                        • #13
                          Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                          Dunbar it sounds like you have your license in Farming as well,

                          I hate to see the land disappear in to houses and such, (In Colorado in a effort to control growth they set the limit to drill your own well at 35 aces), so what did that do just make it worst, there are these 35 acer "ranchets" taking over by populated locations, just a sprawl of houses and wasted land, not enough even to raise a horse on in our areas (limited rainfall) so the horse owners have bare blowing ground, and those who want a country club look try to irrigate the 35 aces with a domestic well,
                          they have spread out for miles from some of the more populated region's it just appalling if that ground is ever needed for agriculture it is so messed up now it has sprawled pit over 100s of square miles not just a few square miles.

                          do to limited moisture it takes a lot more aces out here, but the struggles are the same,

                          but the tobacco farmer one time could make a living on a small tobacco farm like you talked about, now they have taxed an bashed the tobacco industry that most of them are losing there farms as well as the price of tobacco has dropped so much and the work to raise it has not changed much,

                          farming also was diversified, you raised a little of a lot of things, now it is usually a single crop comercial type farm, even for the family farmer, wheat farm or a corn farm or a cattle ranch,

                          but it is hard to compete on any thing with any scale, we raise our own chickens for meat, but I know we get nearly double in them that what we could buy them in the store on sale for. (but there is no com parson on taste or quality).
                          what I have read is the commercial chicken grower makes less than 10 cents per bird, they raise, when sold to the commercial out lets.

                          thank you for your story of your farming experience,
                          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                          attributed to Samuel Johnson
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                            Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
                            There's actually 52 in that list, some you might agree or disagree with.



                            Some of them I found quite disturbing, like the family farms and honey bees.

                            The only ones to blame on the family farms going are the siblings that are cashing out, not keeping the tradition of their parents.
                            I liked this one:

                            23. Cash Registers That Make a Ka-Ching Sound



                            AND the CASH that goes in them, seems like everyone is living on credit or peanuts these days

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Top 25 things Vanishing from The United States

                              Sorry if I came out of the cattle gate a little rough with my statements, but I should of divulged my meaning behind the words.


                              I love the area I'm in, it's mostly large tract acreage. We found a farm about two years ago that sells us brown eggs and they're so damn good, we told everybody and their business is doing well for just word of mouth.

                              The egg whites stand up tall in the skillet, the yellow of the yoke looks almost flourescent. We'll probably find out long after it's too late that the chickens were being fed some type of steroid from baseball practices behind the barn.

                              I envisioned myself when I got older to own a large farm and do what you're doing. It's tough but very rewarding, and there's an awesome feeling to putting in a long day's work from sun up to sun down, knowing you either beat the rain or got one more large agenda knocked out so you can do something else.

                              I was blessed, truly blessed to have that exposure in where I lived and what we did on weekends. We heated with wood my entire childhood and I'm probably the only young kid who made it a challenge to fill the truck up with as much wood as possible.

                              I miss it greatly but like time, things change. That relative of mine who owns that property has become very bitter through time, and drove the majority of family away from him.

                              I found out how quickly at that farm you can damage your prized nuggets on a gravely lawnmower with the small trailing seat on wheels. Right turn, left turn, WHAM! Awwuggggghhhhh!!!!

                              I got the chance to wire his barn up with lights, barn hasn't burned down yet.

                              Learned how to drive a stick with an old jeep truck, had to change the plugs weekly because the rings were in such bad shape.


                              What's going to happen in the next 100 years is this countryside is going to become a populated area. Just look at the speed of 100 years has done to the gradescape already.

                              Someone is going to have to step in and protect these farms because if it doesn't, the true heritage is washed away forever. I'll video a shot of my back yard, and you'll see why I like it so much.


                              I certainly don't hold a license to farming...I just got a really good taste of it...didn't mind it. It's just a different world out there and the only way you can find people to commit to the lifestyle of farming, is to be born and bred into the mindset.
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