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  • #31
    Re: Are you old enough?

    I don't think I've seen a 2 liter glass soda bottle, but I sure remember the heavy wall one quart ones and the wood racks that held 12 of them. The bottles (about 20 years or so ago) had a 25 cents each deposit and the wood rack $2.00. The last of the quart bottles were screw cap, but I remember most being a pry off cap and people had a collection of corks like used today for wine bottles.

    I remember as a young boy brown glass gallon jugs of CLOROX bleach. Drop one and you really had a mess to clean up.


    How about going to WHITE CASTLE for their little "Rat Burgers" sold by the bag? Not too long ago I found them frozen at the market. Personally I prefer to buy good ground beef and hand form my own burgers.
    Last edited by Woussko; 06-06-2009, 05:43 AM.

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    • #32
      Re: Are you old enough?

      If I remember right, those small Coke bottles had the city that they were bottled in molded into the bottom of the bottle. The bottles back then were refillable and you never knew which city the bottle originally came from. We used to make bets on whose bottle was from the most distant city.
      When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

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      • #33
        Re: Are you old enough?

        Originally posted by CWSmith View Post

        (I also remember when there was no TV, at least not on our block. Funny memory, when the radio was about the biggest piece of un-upholstered, furniture in the living room.)


        CWS
        When I was a kid we were lucky enough to have a bw RCA tv and our radio was a portable table top unit that lived on the kitchen table.

        I do remember most corner stores had "tube testers" and I used to tag along with my Dad when our tv would not light up. He would pull most of the tubes and head to the corner with a pocket full of em to check

        Stick em in the tester one by one and if one didn't light up that was the culprit

        Match the number on the tube to one of the new tubes in the rack on the wall, pay your .75ยข (or whatever it was) and you where good for another few months. If you hurried home you could put it all back together in time for Ed Sullivan or the Honeymooners
        Cheers! - Jim
        -------------
        All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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        • #34
          Re: Are you old enough?

          Post #6. Better not be runnin' that mouth to the old lady on Saturday Night.

          http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...a%3DN%26um%3D1

          J.C.

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          • #35
            Re: Are you old enough?

            Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
            You guys were lucky. Back in the thirties, we didn't know what lunch was!!
            And you walked 5 miles to school and it was uphill both ways.

            A good size rock and a pot of hot water and you can make stone Soup.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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            • #36
              Re: Are you old enough?

              [QUOTE=saysflushable;234099]Just think I have never been actually- no food-today because we have no money hungry. Man am I lucky and thankful!!!
              QUOTE]

              You're right there my friend. Let's hope we don't go back to those times. I truely doubt many people today could make it through something like that, it was only ~75 years ago but the world has changed so much. People don't realize what they have today.
              "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

              https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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              • #37
                Re: Are you old enough?

                Originally posted by DSurette View Post
                If I remember right, those small Coke bottles had the city that they were bottled in molded into the bottom of the bottle. The bottles back then were refillable and you never knew which city the bottle originally came from. We used to make bets on whose bottle was from the most distant city.
                Many of those bottles came from right here in South Jersey, from a bottle plant located not far from me. O-I had the third largest bottle plant in the world there, producing more than a billion bottles a year. They made bottles for Coke among other companies. It was 1987 I think when they made their last Coke bottle there.

                If you'd like to see a photo of the plant at it's peak in the 50s, look for item # 370110232588 on eBay. Not my item for sale just the first photo I came across of the plant.

                Glass making is still a big industry here, but roughly 15% of what it was when thousands of people worked in the dozen of so glass plants in the county.

                If you are trying to decode a bottle mark try this page for help with old Coke bottles made by O-I
                http://www.sha.org/research_resource...s/lockhart.htm

                or here: http://www.sha.org/bottle/websitemap.htm
                Last edited by Bob D.; 06-05-2009, 11:33 PM.
                "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

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                • #38
                  Re: Are you old enough?

                  As I recall, Binghamton had a Coke bottling plant back in the 50's. The building is still there, now only two blocks from the house we bought a couple of years ago.

                  Anybody remember when milk used to come in bottles with cardboard caps and paper wrappers over the top of the bottle. Milk companies used to deliver right to your door and almost everyone had an asbestos box that would hold four quart bottles. I can't remember if delivery was daily or what. I do remember that the cream always separated to the top and you had to shake the Dickens out of the bottle before you could use it. My Dad used to pour some of the cream off the top for his coffee.

                  Off course milk wasn't the only thing you could get delivered to your door either. Dry Cleaning guy came around twice a week and if you stuck their card (about page size) in your window, they'd stop and pick up cloths up. Doctors used to make house-calls too... and then there was the ice man (before we got a refrigerator), the coal delivery, and if you lived in the city, the bakery had a delivery as did the local grocery store. Mom and the neighbors would simply call the grocer and some kid would stop by in the afternoon.

                  One of the things I miss from back then is fresh bread. Real pet peeve of mine is when you go to the local Walmart or whatever brand grocery store you have and the bread is as hard as a rock... and the date says it's still fresh for another week! Back in the 50's and early 60's the bread was fresh every day, cost's 28 cents for a big loaf. If you wanted to pay less, you could go to the bakery at 5:00 and buy it for half price. "Day-old" bread was considered stale!

                  Remember when cars had "visors" and almost everyone had a hand-operated spot light on the driver's door. The drive in used to run these stupid little film clips before the movie so that all the driver's could chase the character around the screen with their spot lights. Today, that really sounds dumb!

                  Wousko... when I first started driving (back in 62), gas was 26 cents for regular. My old 56 Merc, would travel several days on a dollar's worth of gas. By the time I bought my first new car in 65 (VW) gas was 28-cents a gallon. I could fill'er up for just about $3. Funny, but three years later when I was driving 150 miles round-trip between Painted Post and Binghamton every day, gas was still about 30-cents a gallon in Binghamton and was 34-cents here in Painted Post. The road was mostly 2-lane and I had a 68 Plymoth Valiant, slant-six.

                  CWS

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                  • #39
                    Re: Are you old enough?

                    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                    And you walked 5 miles to school and it was uphill both ways.

                    A good size rock and a pot of hot water and you can make stone Soup.
                    Aw Bob, you are wrong--it was only 4 miles! Seriously, there were days when my mother was beside herself because she had nothing to fix for supper. I hope none of us see those days again. As for Coke and Pepsi---

                    Pepsi Cola hits the spot
                    12 full ounces, that's a lot
                    Twice as much for a nickel, too
                    Pepsi Cola is the drink for you!

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                    • #40
                      Re: Are you old enough?

                      My first one was Roy Rogers, My second was Leave it to Beaver! My 3rd was when I started working, got myself a Flintstones lunchbox, fred has always been my hero.
                      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                      • #41
                        Re: Are you old enough?

                        I still use my Scooby Doo lunchbox every day. Nobody told me to stop...
                        Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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                        • #42
                          Re: Are you old enough?

                          I didn't have a lunch box. My mom would put up my lunch in a brown paper sack.

                          The popular lunch boxes were Hopalong Cassidy. Roy Rogers, Gene Autry and the round top, black ones that looked like a treasure chest. The thermos was held in the top by a wire retainer.

                          We walked a mile to school, each way, as there were no such thing as school buses in town. If you had the money you could buy a weekly ticket and ride the Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway bus.

                          No cafeteria in school, eat at your desk, a small container of milk was 2 cents at the school.

                          If we wanted water we had to smash together hydrogen and oxygen atoms.

                          Remember milk delivered to the front door in the winter and the cream would freeze and pop the cardboard cap. Scrape off the frozen cream. mix in sugar and have cereal with ice cream in the AM. (This used to anger dad as he had no cream for his coffee).

                          Remember white margerine in a plastic bag with a capsule of dye. Break the capsule and nead the bag to get it to look like butter. (The dairy industry had power in those days).

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                          • #43
                            Re: Are you old enough?

                            CWS

                            You bring back many memories. Yes to glass milk bottles to the door. In my case we had an aluminum box with a hinged lid that could hold 8 quart bottles. We had little molded plastic (if I remember right) numbers to sit on top of the empty bottles to let the milkman know how many full ones we wanted and if we wanted any pints of cream or a pound of butter sticks. We had the laundry man come once or maybe twice per week. I heard of the bread trucks but we didn't have them in our area. The local markets did receive bread daily. Our newspapers were placed by the front door rather than thrown in the yard to scatter and make a big mess. The paper boy had a wagon full of them. Today they drive by in a truck and just throw the papers all over. GRRR

                            By the way do any of you remember when cars had vent windows and rain gutters? With what I drive now I can't hardly crack open a window when it's raining and not get wet.


                            A special thanks to JC for starting this thread. Maybe it's time for it to go back to lunch boxes again.
                            Last edited by Woussko; 06-06-2009, 02:53 PM.

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                            • #44
                              Re: Are you old enough?

                              I used to love to go to the plumbing supply house with my dad. Their soda machine was rigged up so you didn't have to pay. How cool is that? The machine wasn't a tall one like the one in Jackie Gleason's office in the movie Soldier in the Rain (though that was also a magical machine). It was waist high (for an adult) and had racks which held the bottles by their necks. You slid the bottle down the rack until there was an opening in the channel where you could pull it out.

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                              • #45
                                Re: Are you old enough?

                                yea i had a metal one cant remember what was on it maybe scooby doo or tom and jerry or some plad print. broke the thermous the first day i used it.

                                i dont recall using it much after that. but i do remember the brown paper bags with my moms cream cheese and honey sandwitches on toasted bread. YUM.

                                My friend in class always wanted to trade lunches too hes always have bologna with mustard.

                                funny how you remember stuff sometimes.

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