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Clunker Tragedy

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  • Clunker Tragedy

    I can't take it, watching all those beautiful cars crushed makes no sense at all. Such a waste of resources, good engines and car parts being buried instead of put to good use goes against my sense of right and wrong. We are such a wasteful society and the fools who designed this program should be held accountable for their shortsightness. Even if they wanted to keep these cars off the road, they are still wasting all the spare parts. I don't know what the plan is but we only had one good public trade/vocational school in my area and the govenor made sure it got closed. Disposable society, that does not want people to learn how to repair things. Just replace the entire unit, no more fixing! Same goes for cars. Insane. President Obama was talking about America building the next great battery technology and the next great battery car, right here in the USA. I wish the President would figure out who will buy all those new cars, this clunker program pretty much exhausted new car buyers and if the economy continues to decline, new cars won't be on the top of the list of must haves. What a waste!

  • #2
    Re: Clunker Tragedy

    If nothing else they should be given to trade schools as fix up projects. To junk any machine which with a little repair and some good old TLC could help people is stupid beyond stupid. There has to be big and I mean big $$$ in this for the *&^$ politicians somewhere.
    Last edited by Woussko; 08-09-2009, 08:16 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Clunker Tragedy

      What they should have done is allowed people to trade in even less fuel efficient cars for some of the "clunkers" traded in. Lets say you have a car that gets 8mpg you would be able to go and trade in for one of the 16mpg cars that were set to be trashed.

      So many people are tooting their horns about the success of this program. Directly throwing cash into any industry is going to show a temporary improvement

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      • #4
        Re: Clunker Tragedy

        Agreed. Even some very old cars get good gas mileage. My dad has a 1966 volvo 122S that gets better gas mileage than my 92 Plymouth sundance. I think he gets like 18 MPG around town and 28 on the highway in that old beast considering its only a 4 cylinder. If he gets the valves done he will get even more.I also think that with all this car-crushing a lot of very valuable non-ferrous metals will get wasted, considering the process of collecting them is not 100% effective as it is and increased car crushing will mean greater errors amongst junkyard staff. Not to mention if we all start driving battery operated cars we will then have a mass quantity of batteries to dispose of. How good will that be for the environment, not very good in my opinion.

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        • #5
          Re: Clunker Tragedy

          all it is a auto bail out, if they wanted to they the government could have bought new cars and trucks, (instead of stepping in to completion of private business),
          If the idea was to up grade for gas millage, then great, use a tax credit, and do not destroy the cars, but let the next tier of buyers up grade, and get a tax credit, and soon real clunkers would be traded in and scraped, I would love to upgrade my truck or van,
          (van has close to 300,000 and about 10 to 12 mpg) my guess is most all of the vans being traded in (currently under the program) would do 2 or more mpg better, than what I have.

          and with a tax credit it would still encourage people to trade up, and it would help the full realm of mileage across the fleet, and (yes there would be less revenue with a tax credit, but it would not be money payed out necessarily, and there would be little bureaucracy with it), (

          MY personal opinion would be if it would be for all up grades, in mileage, the incentive would not need to be great, to encourage it, a few hundred dollars to a max of thousand,

          this current system hurts the used car dealer, hurts parts stores, hurts even the junk yards as the most valuable part of the car is messed up, and non profits are hurt as people are not donating there cars, and the lower income is hurt as many many good cars and trucks are taken out of circulation,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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          • #6
            Re: Clunker Tragedy

            My truck gets 8 mpg, and I still ain't trading it in. Wish I could, but for the dollars I have put into it, just doesn't seem right. $2100.00 under the front end, $800.00 for new tires, new lock outs, plus so much other stuff. Not because it really needed it, it's called preventative maintenance. Sometimes, it just ain't right to get rid of what you have. Sure, I wish I could get 4-6 mpg more, but if you sit down and do the dollar math, forget it, it'll take me years to get back from what I have into it. Remember this, if someone does sit down to do the math, I have a 1 ton and I haul some heavy stuff, so don't even think that an F250 is my best option, and yes, I'm a Ford man..... LOL.....
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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            • #7
              Re: Clunker Tragedy

              I think everything is getting more disposable these days. I bought a black and decker string trimmer last summer and its already broken and no one in town will service it and sending it to Edmonton will cost even more than replacing it. Even future shop has a brochure out talking about their "don't repair it replace it" policy where they will try to replace broken stuff under warranty.Unbelievable. I wonder what's going to happen when we run out of places to throw stuff out. Kind of reminds me of George Carlin's (spelling?) "stuff" speech. You know how your house is just a place to put your stuff? Soon "stuff" will consume us all, but it's kind of happened already.

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              • #8
                Re: Clunker Tragedy

                I agree that trade schools could benefit from some of these cars and the students would have a ball learning. I also agree with what Josh said about trading in an older or worse car for one of these so called clunkers. I like my 1990 Maxima and have done plenty of preventive work, but with over 250,000 miles on it the gas mileage is not good and you reach a point of diminished return on money invested. I would gladly trade up for one of those low mileage cars some spoiled person no longer wanted. The program makes me mad and spotlights our poor choices to the rest of the world. Imagine folks in poverty stricken countries who might see what we are willing to crush and bury? Disgraceful.

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                • #9
                  Re: Clunker Tragedy

                  Originally posted by Marklar89 View Post
                  I think everything is getting more disposable these days. I bought a black and decker string trimmer last summer and its already broken and no one in town will service it and sending it to Edmonton will cost even more than replacing it. Even future shop has a brochure out talking about their "don't repair it replace it" policy where they will try to replace broken stuff under warranty.Unbelievable. I wonder what's going to happen when we run out of places to throw stuff out. Kind of reminds me of George Carlin's (spelling?) "stuff" speech. You know how your house is just a place to put your stuff? Soon "stuff" will consume us all, but it's kind of happened already.
                  All you have to do is ride around on trash day in some of these communities and see what folks are willing to dump rather than fix, sell or donate. TV's and other electronics that still work but are not in style, appliances that might need a new belt, or switch. I'm kind of handy and have offered to help neighbors with some things that need repair, but all too often they would rather buy new. People are suprised to see some of the things I've fixed with epoxy. My neighbor was going to throw out a lamp and a juicing machine. The lamp had a light sensor that was defective, I just bypassed it and the lamp was fine. The juicer was a $200.00 health food store model, all stainless steel with a quiet and strong motor. I fixed a crack in the housing and polished it up like new, I can't believe he was going to just dump it!

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                  • #10
                    Re: Clunker Tragedy

                    Originally posted by garager View Post
                    My truck gets 8 mpg, and I still ain't trading it in. Wish I could, but for the dollars I have put into it, just doesn't seem right. $2100.00 under the front end, $800.00 for new tires, new lock outs, plus so much other stuff. Not because it really needed it, it's called preventative maintenance. Sometimes, it just ain't right to get rid of what you have. Sure, I wish I could get 4-6 mpg more, but if you sit down and do the dollar math, forget it, it'll take me years to get back from what I have into it. Remember this, if someone does sit down to do the math, I have a 1 ton and I haul some heavy stuff, so don't even think that an F250 is my best option, and yes, I'm a Ford man..... LOL.....
                    Maybe a very beefed up F250 but I think more like a F350. Not cheap and they are fuel hogs at best. Maybe a Diesel, but there goes even more money.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Clunker Tragedy

                      Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                      Maybe a very beefed up F250 but I think more like a F350. Not cheap and they are fuel hogs at best. Maybe a Diesel, but there goes even more money.
                      Like I said, buddy. The cost will take too dang long to justify a move. I sink money into my truck, so I can have it forever. Now if the engine blows or I become rich, now that's a whole nother ball game......

                      A person, can keep their vehicle for a very long time. Think of it like this, instead of going out and buying a new house, you just paint the walls, put in new cabinets and maybe a sunroom addition. It's cheaper and you have a new look and your no longer bored with your home. You can do the same to a truck/car and be able to live w/it. However if you live in MN. and the salt gets to the metal of your vehicle, well then it becomes to cost worthy, time to buy new.
                      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                      http://www.contractorspub.com

                      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Clunker Tragedy

                        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                        All you have to do is ride around on trash day in some of these communities and see what folks are willing to dump rather than fix, sell or donate. TV's and other electronics that still work but are not in style, appliances that might need a new belt, or switch. I'm kind of handy and have offered to help neighbors with some things that need repair, but all too often they would rather buy new. People are suprised to see some of the things I've fixed with epoxy. My neighbor was going to throw out a lamp and a juicing machine. The lamp had a light sensor that was defective, I just bypassed it and the lamp was fine. The juicer was a $200.00 health food store model, all stainless steel with a quiet and strong motor. I fixed a crack in the housing and polished it up like new, I can't believe he was going to just dump it!
                        Very much agree. I picked up an old Honda ex 350 generator the other day that " wasn't working". All that was wrong with it was the carb wasn't adjusted properly. I later looked on ebay to find people buying them for hundreds of dollars and that they originally sold for 800 bucks. The only cost I paid for the generator was the gas and two stroke oil I put in it. Its only about the size of a lunchbox and it can run plenty of work lights and stuff. Amazing....the guy was gonna throw the thing out too. Fixed my neighbours lawnmower she was going to chuck...all it needed was fresh gas, the blade didn't even need to be sharpened! Pretty crazy what people throw out. When I lived in Yellowknife there were tons of dump scavengers, Vince might know of this too considering he lived there for a while. Those guys are great they salvage and repair all kinds of stuff. There is a guy who writes a column in the Yellowknife NWT newspaper called "tales from the dump" and its all about the goings-on there. If i find an old Yellowknife newspaper I'll scan it and show you.

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