Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

For Frankiarmz

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • For Frankiarmz

    It's around 25 minutes, but I think you will find it interesting all the way to the end.

    http://www.hulu.com/watch/91553/vang...ent#s-p1-so-i0

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: For Frankiarmz

    I did find it interesting.
    Espescially the question he raised at the end of our own economy.

    It does help seeing we are not the only ones suffering.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: For Frankiarmz

      J.C., thanks for the informative and thought provoking video. I'm sure most of us drew some conclusions as we watched and listened. I thought I was seeing where some of the trillion dollar trade deficit money ended up, as well as the billions of American consumer dollars. I felt bad for the lowly migrants who left their villages and had to return to a life of simple existence, at the same time I feel bad for the many Americans out of work, homeless and facing uncertain futures. The last few lines really hit home, because if communist china can reignite their economy without the American consumer we will have lost any bargaining edge we held. I'm no great thinker, maybe my conclusions are way off base, but I don't see how our government, big business, or we as consumers expected to buy the worlds goods as we depleted our country's wealth through outsourcing and loss of manufacturing?
      Investing in the stock market, housing, technology and service, does not work if our manufacturing base is absent. I still think unless we can provide what we consume, we are doomed! Great video into the plight of china, now what about us?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: For Frankiarmz

        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
        J.C., thanks for the informative and thought provoking video. I'm sure most of us drew some conclusions as we watched and listened. I thought I was seeing where some of the trillion dollar trade deficit money ended up, as well as the billions of American consumer dollars. I felt bad for the lowly migrants who left their villages and had to return to a life of simple existence, at the same time I feel bad for the many Americans out of work, homeless and facing uncertain futures. The last few lines really hit home, because if communist china can reignite their economy without the American consumer we will have lost any bargaining edge we held. I'm no great thinker, maybe my conclusions are way off base, but I don't see how our government, big business, or we as consumers expected to buy the worlds goods as we depleted our country's wealth through outsourcing and loss of manufacturing?
        Investing in the stock market, housing, technology and service, does not work if our manufacturing base is absent. I still think unless we can provide what we consume, we are doomed! Great video into the plight of china, now what about us?
        I didn't think in terms of the "plight of China" at all really.

        I do think of the parallels of human nature irregardless of race or governments.

        One thing I noticed is similarity. In my area many years ago everyone was a farmer. Some successful but for the majority just hard work, poverty, and suffering.

        Then industrial revolution came and here textiles were king. All the poor, less successful people from farms left and went to work in.....textile factories.

        Behaved exactly like the Chinese people without one knowing the other or a thought about them.

        Most textiles have moved to Mexico, China, or India now. A few around with government contracts. Those displaced from these jobs were able to move into other areas of employment as it was slower to happen and started around 20 years ago. (Estimate)

        But their are many empty factory buildings.

        Just an interesting parallel, at least for me, to think about.

        I, and you, have been saying it for awhile. EVERY country/economy MUST produce something tangible and have a basis for that economy.

        J.C.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: For Frankiarmz

          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
          I didn't think in terms of the "plight of China" at all really.

          I do think of the parallels of human nature irregardless of race or governments.

          One thing I noticed is similarity. In my area many years ago everyone was a farmer. Some successful but for the majority just hard work, poverty, and suffering.

          Then industrial revolution came and here textiles were king. All the poor, less successful people from farms left and went to work in.....textile factories.

          Behaved exactly like the Chinese people without one knowing the other or a thought about them.

          Most textiles have moved to Mexico, China, or India now. A few around with government contracts. Those displaced from these jobs were able to move into other areas of employment as it was slower to happen and started around 20 years ago. (Estimate)

          But their are many empty factory buildings.

          Just an interesting parallel, at least for me, to think about.

          I, and you, have been saying it for awhile. EVERY country/economy MUST produce something tangible and have a basis for that economy.

          J.C.
          I agree both societies share some similarities including the desire for human rights, workers rights and so forth. Wheter or not the governemtn of china will change to a democracy remains to be seen. I am not suggesting isolationism, although my posts may often read that way. I do think we need to produce much more of what we consume and certainly enough to eradicate the trade deficit. Imagine a future where china does become independant of the American consumer, grows their standard of living and in turn outsources their manufacturing? Hard to imagine because the chinese would have learned from our mistakes. Since we somewhat agree with where we are, how we got here and what we need to do, I ask again, "Will our legislators do whatever is necessary to bring back jobs, employ Americans and stop wasteful spending"? Sadly, I don't think they either see the scope of the problem or have the desire to tackle the solution. Our problems are far more serious than healthcare reform, not that it is not a serious issue.

          Comment

          Working...
          X