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  • Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

    This has got to be one of the most assinine statements ever told. And I'll tell you exactly why they are doing it.


    This is the big turn in direction, the preparation of this national health care that's coming. We are going to be the victims of "new rules" that they are now shelfing out for us to see.

    Those making the statements about "not" needing these screenings are paid drones.

    Then they say that the complications/stress is greater than the detection and it's revelation?


    Guess what; you get sick and NOW it's up to you to pay for your yearly screening, no matter what a body of money is telling otherwise.

    Breast cancer is striking at all ages; I find it repulsive that now all of a sudden that politics of health care are deciding who can get cancer at what age ranges?


    You think your present health care has holes like swiss cheese in what's covered, wait till you see the waiting lines for the common necessity/detection regimines when everybody and their brother has a free ride to the same.

    This is going to give the health care industry a boner because now, now they can offer a platinum coverage that for the money provides what's above sub par. Even more money with the target being hit like an IED at a school full of kids. Big business cooperating with big government and we are the spectators who'll see this through a bystander's eyes only.

    I feel sorry for every woman out there that now possibly loses her chance for early detection at breast cancer because the powers that be say it is not necessary.

    I find that so disheartening because just in this forum community there are wives/girlfriends/daughters that are in their 40's that could easily get hit with cancer in this fashion and no one is resilient to cancer. It strikes without warning.

    If it can kill/wipe out even the wealthiest/most well known or high status individuals in this land, that proves that early detection should never be used as hinderance.

    We all know this will cause heartbreak for families as I'm sure this early detection tests are expensive. The idea is to live long and prosperous.

    As much money as hospitals make off the disease CANCER...they should make the protection affordable for checkups/screenings no more than the cost of an oil change.

    But that wouldn't make sense would it...something fair to all. Isn't that the rolling tone of national health care? Such irony.
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  • #2
    Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

    Makes my teats ache.

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    • #3
      Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

      I was just listening to this report on the news at a customers house a few minutes ago, and the very first thought I had was that the timing is rather convenient for this. I am going to have a real hard time not believing that this is a government ploy to reduce health care costs right before they are going to take over everything. One of my friends wife who is 45 found something on her breast, went to the doctor, and sure enough, it's cancer. Now they have people on the news saying don't go to a doctor for a test, don't even do a self exam? What kind of crap is that? The ignore it and it will go away is a poor approach to medicine. This government run health care is very scary to me.

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      • #4
        Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

        Thanks for this Thread. Not only do they want to stop the screening, if I heard right they want to discourage self examination! My wife was diagnosed with Breast Cancer which did not show up on a mamogram but rather by her doctor examining her during a visit. There will be a lot women dying from Breast Cancer unnecessarily. I'm sure prostate exams for men will alos be discouraged with the new healthcare guidelines. We are going backwards as a society.

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        • #5
          Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

          My mother is a breast cancer survivor she was 38 at the time if was in affect she would have surly died. This man is a moron! My wife at 22 was screened and they found a tumor and the removed it. Luckily is was not cancer but the doc said it could have been. I know several other women in my church and family that have similar stories most before the age of 40.


          This makes me sick!!!!!

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          • #6
            Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

            Sorry to hear of your situation frankie. Thank the good lord your wife's doctor found it.

            Unfortunately I have a rather extensive background about breast cancer as my mother lived 13 years before she succombed to it. It was aggressive. I know things about breast cancer I swear I wish I didn't know.

            One crucial bit of advice:


            Do NOT take chances on playing off doctor's timelines for screenings/MRI's.


            When they start announcing longer timelines between checkups, that's where disaster can happen because you're relying on symptoms to realize it has come back, or it moved. I know a fellow that got a thumbs up on MRI reading for prostate cancer, was misread and his doctor said "Come back and see us in 2 years"...


            Well, he came back alright, 14.5 months later and that prostate cancer grew the entire time. He died exactly 12 months from his retirement of 40 years at JCPenny.
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            • #7
              Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

              I heard an argument only 1 in 1,900 will find Breast Cancer so it's not worth testing. Seems to me that the 1 in 1,900 might think it would be worth testing.

              Mark
              Last edited by ToUtahNow; 11-17-2009, 07:42 PM.
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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              • #8
                Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                My wife had a biopsy done last week, doctor thought she might have uterine cancer! Got good news today, test was negative. Once you or someone you care for goes through a cancer event, the fear of a cancer returning is always there. Cancer was always something other folks got, I thought my wife was bullet proof a real strong woman. Found out she was human! I pray these people putting forth these bad ideas come to their senses and don't cost other folks their lives. I'm sorry for the folks here who have had cancer touch their lives, but I'm impressed with how well so many understand the illness and risks. The Ridgid Forum is a very special place.

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                • #9
                  Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                  A couple of links related somewhat to things that could be.

                  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...roundtheworld/

                  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontl...rld/countries/

                  J.C.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                    I heard an argument only 1 in 19,000 will have Breast Cancer so it's not worth testing. Seems to me that the 1 in 19,000 might think it would be worth testing.

                    Mark


                    That number might actually be right since there's 300+ million people.

                    But in 2005 with my family member as one of those in the statistics, this reference table from CDC indicates that over 41,000 women died in 2005 alone.


                    That's like an NFL game where every woman in the stands is marked for death.




                    Think that is bad, look at this statistic.
                    Last edited by DUNBAR PLUMBING; 11-17-2009, 07:09 PM.
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                    • #11
                      Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                      Sorry I think the number was 1 in 1,900 would be saved by early diagnosis. I will edit my post.

                      Mark
                      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                        Information from one of the links in an earlier post.

                        United Kingdom

                        An interview with an expert on the UK's system +

                        Percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) spent on health care: 8.3

                        Average family premium: None; funded by taxation.

                        Co-payments: None for most services; some co-pays for dental care, eyeglasses and 5 percent of prescriptions. Young people and the elderly are exempt from all drug co-pays.

                        What is it? The British system is "socialized medicine" because the government both provides and pays for health care. Britons pay taxes for health care, and the government-run National Health Service (NHS) distributes those funds to health care providers. Hospital doctors are paid salaries. General practitioners (GPs), who run private practices, are paid based on the number of patients they see. A small number of specialists work outside the NHS and see private-pay patients.

                        Co-payments: None for most services; some co-pays for dental care, eyeglasses and 5 percent of prescriptions. care, and the government-run National Health Service (NHS) distributes those funds to health care providers. Hospital doctors are paid salaries. General practitioners (GPs), who run private practices, are paid based on the number of patients they see. A small number of specialists work outside the NHS and see private-pay patients.

                        How does it work? Because the system is funded through taxes, administrative costs are low; there are no bills to collect or claims to review. Patients have a "medical home" in their GP, who also serves as a gatekeeper to the rest of the system; patients must see their GP before going to a specialist. GPs, who are paid extra for keeping their patients healthy, are instrumental in preventive care, an area in which Britain is a world leader.

                        What are the concerns? The stereotype of socialized medicine -- long waits and limited choice -- still has some truth. In response, the British government has instituted reforms to help make care more competitive and give patients more choice. Hospitals now compete for NHS funds distributed by local Primary Care Trusts, and starting in April 2008 patients are able to choose where they want to be treated for many procedures.


                        Japan

                        An interview with an expert on Japan's system +

                        Percentage of GDP spent on health care: 8

                        Average family premium: $280 per month, with employers paying more than half.

                        Co-payments: 30 percent of the cost of a procedure, but the total amount paid in a month is capped according to income.

                        What is it? Japan uses a "social insurance" system in which all citizens are required to have health insurance, either through their work or purchased from a nonprofit, community-based plan. Those who can't afford the premiums receive public assistance. Most health insurance is private; doctors and almost all hospitals are in the private sector.

                        How does it work? Japan boasts some of the best health statistics in the world, no doubt due in part to the Japanese diet and lifestyle. Unlike the U.K., there are no gatekeepers; the Japanese can go to any specialist when and as often as they like. Every two years the Ministry of Health negotiates with physicians to set the price for every procedure. This helps keeps costs down.

                        What are the concerns?
                        In fact, Japan has been so successful at keeping costs down that Japan now spends too little on health care; half of the hospitals in Japan are operating in the red. Having no gatekeepers means there's no check on how often the Japanese use health care, and patients may lack a medical home.


                        Germany

                        An interview with an expert on Germany's system +

                        Percentage of GDP spent on health care: 10.7

                        Average family premium: $750 per month; premiums are pegged to patients' income.

                        Co-payments: 10 euros ($15) every three months; some patients, like pregnant women, are exempt.

                        What is it? Germany, like Japan, uses a social insurance model. In fact, Germany is the birthplace of social insurance, which dates back to Chancellor Otto von Bismarck. But unlike the Japanese, who get insurance from work or are assigned to a community fund, Germans are free to buy their insurance from one of more than 200 private, nonprofit "sickness funds." As in Japan, the poor receive public assistance to pay their premiums.

                        How does it work?
                        Sickness funds are nonprofit and cannot deny coverage based on preexisting conditions; they compete with each other for members, and fund managers are paid based on the size of their enrollments. Like Japan, Germany is a single-payment system, but instead of the government negotiating the prices, the sickness funds bargain with doctors as a group. Germans can go straight to a specialist without first seeing a gatekeeper doctor, but they may pay a higher co-pay if they do.

                        What are the concerns? The single-payment system leaves some German doctors feeling underpaid. A family doctor in Germany makes about two-thirds as much as he or she would in America. (Then again, German doctors pay much less for malpractice insurance, and many attend medical school for free.) Germany also lets the richest 10 percent opt out of the sickness funds in favor of U.S.-style for-profit insurance. These patients are generally seen more quickly by doctors, because the for-profit insurers pay doctors more than the sickness funds.


                        Taiwan

                        An interview with an expert on Taiwan's system +

                        Percentage GDP spent on health care: 6.3

                        Average family premium: $650 per year for a family for four.

                        Co-payments: 20 percent of the cost of drugs, up to $6.50; up to $7 for outpatient care; $1.80 for dental and traditional Chinese medicine. There are exemptions for major diseases, childbirth, preventive services, and for the poor, veterans, and children.

                        What is it? Taiwan adopted a "National Health Insurance" model in 1995 after studying other countries' systems. Like Japan and Germany, all citizens must have insurance, but there is only one, government-run insurer. Working people pay premiums split with their employers; others pay flat rates with government help; and some groups, like the poor and veterans, are fully subsidized. The resulting system is similar to Canada's -- and the U.S. Medicare program.

                        How does it work?
                        Taiwan's new health system extended insurance to the 40 percent of the population that lacked it while actually decreasing the growth of health care spending. The Taiwanese can see any doctor without a referral. Every citizen has a smart card, which is used to store his or her medical history and bill the national insurer. The system also helps public health officials monitor standards and effect policy changes nationwide. Thanks to this use of technology and the country's single insurer, Taiwan's health care system has the lowest administrative costs in the world.

                        What are the concerns? Like Japan, Taiwan's system is not taking in enough money to cover the medical care it provides. The problem is compounded by politics, because it is up to Taiwan's parliament to approve an increase in insurance premiums, which it has only done once since the program was enacted.


                        Switzerland

                        An interview with an expert on Switzerland's system +

                        Percentage of GDP spent on health care: 11.6

                        Average monthly family premium: $750, paid entirely by consumers; there are government subsidies for low-income citizens.

                        Co-payments: 10 percent of the cost of services, up to $420 per year.

                        What is it? The Swiss system is social insurance like in Japan and Germany, voted in by a national referendum in 1994. Switzerland didn't have far to go to achieve universal coverage; 95 percent of the population already had voluntary insurance when the law was passed. All citizens are required to have coverage; those not covered were automatically assigned to a company. The government provides assistance to those who can't afford the premiums.

                        How does it work? The Swiss example shows that universal coverage is possible, even in a highly capitalist nation with powerful insurance and pharmaceutical industries. Insurance companies are not allowed to make a profit on basic care and are prohibited from cherry-picking only young and healthy applicants. They can make money on supplemental insurance, however. As in Germany, the insurers negotiate with providers to set standard prices for services, but drug prices are set by the government.

                        What are the concerns? The Swiss system is the second most expensive in the world -- but it's still far cheaper than U.S. health care. Drug prices are still slightly higher than in other European nations, and even then the discounts may be subsidized by the more expensive U.S. market, where some Swiss drug companies make one-third of their profits. In general, the Swiss do not have gatekeeper doctors, although some insurance plans require them or give a discount to consumers who use them.


                        This is from the article. I highlighted what I thought were some interesting points. I believe it was done in the 2007-2008 year.


                        J.C.
                        Last edited by BobsPlumbing; 11-18-2009, 02:34 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                          I had to jump through all kinds of hoops for my insurance company to authorize a mamogram since I am under 40. Even with approval it costs me $500 to get it done. I can easily see someone choosing to use this money for another expense. It has to cost more to treat someone with cancer than to pay for early detection. OY!
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                          • #14
                            Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                            Originally posted by MrsSeatDown View Post
                            It has to cost more to treat someone with cancer than to pay for early detection. OY!
                            Nope! Because in the long run someone with cancer dies quicker.
                            It's a #'s game and if this administration gets their way, it will only get worse.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Breast Cancer isn't a concern for females 40-50?

                              Originally posted by MrsSeatDown View Post
                              I had to jump through all kinds of hoops for my insurance company to authorize a mamogram since I am under 40. Even with approval it costs me $500 to get it done. I can easily see someone choosing to use this money for another expense. It has to cost more to treat someone with cancer than to pay for early detection. OY!
                              It's good you're getting checked at an early age because it happens too often these days.

                              I wish there were more women on this site that could give credence to how concerned women are about this disease, and how hard already it is to get these types of tests done when it doesn't critique into this BS mold that the insurance companies have built.

                              One big money racket is all it is.
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