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The Future-What will disappear?

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  • #91
    Re: The Future-What will disappear?

    Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
    So you'd be okay with the KKK or the American Nazi party having a few Apache Helicopters or perhaps a B2 or maybe a few ballistic missles?

    And of course we wouldn't be able to deny the Jewish Defence League, yout local Mosque, the religious right, Fox News and the NAACP, or even any of the well financed drug cartels and human trafficers that have a stake in America. Just think what the illegal immigrants in your local town could do, if they can come up with the financing.

    Yep, sounds like a pretty smart idea to me!

    CWS
    Yep one of the unfortunate aspects of freedom everyone gets it.

    Comment


    • #92
      Re: The Future-What will disappear?

      I think when a person or group's mission infringes on anothers right to "Life, Liberty, and The Pursuit of Happiness", the government "We The People", can pull the plug. We have a real problem in this county with hate groups bent on undermining the peaceful happiness of individual, law abiding citizens and disturbing law and order of our country. The right to bear arms along with freedom of speech , have been perverted to accomodate modern interpretations, never intended or envisioned by our country's founders.

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      • #93
        Re: The Future-What will disappear?

        Good Pizza,

        Its seems every year that more and more GOOD pizza is disappearing and franchises are taking over.


        That is just my opinion of course, I miss you good pizza!

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        • #94
          Re: The Future-What will disappear?

          The Phonebook.

          J.C.

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          • #95
            Re: The Future-What will disappear?

            Great thread everyone... I agree with a lot of it and much of it saddens me.

            - This ties into Freedoms and Liberties... but I think there is a movement growing to start throwing away pieces of the constitution because it is "no longer relevant". Once we start tossing pieces of the document or completely ignorning them in our lawmaking the constitution will quickly become just a historic document instead of a guiding document.

            - To extend Tyman's comments about CDs. I think we will see all optically read media go away (DVDs, BlueRays, Cds, etc.). There are so many advantages to digital solid state storage. I really think the driving factor here is everyone having rock solid internet connections so they can quickly download and upload content. Once that happens, there is going to be a quickly diminishing roll that disks play. This may sound a bit scarry but it can actually make things way more user friendly in the long run.

            Josh

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            • #96
              Re: The Future-What will disappear?

              Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
              The Phonebook.

              J.C.
              Sounds good to me. No more yellowpage salesmen!
              www.ClinkscalesSeptic.com

              Comment


              • #97
                Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                Josh and Tyman,

                I agree with your thoughts that the CD and probably all "optical" media will go away. I've been playing and using a "personal computer" since the late 70's with our purchase of an Atari 800 system. Removable storage has evolved at an ever-increasing rate since then. My Atari had a six-inch floppy that held about 60 kB. That was around 1978 or 79. First IBM PC came along in 1982 with no hard drive and two 340 kb, 6" floppys. A year or so later, the floppy had 360 kb capacity.

                It took a few more years for the floppy to evolve to those cute little 3-1/2 inch size with the spring-loaded shutter; first with 720 kb and then with 1.2 MB. In the early 90's tape drives were gaining limited popularity, but their linear storage proved a real pain and they lost popularity almost within a year or two.

                In the mid 90's there was a quantum leap with the Iomega Zip drive. Small, portable and with a $10 disk housed in a sturdy case, they held a massive 100 Mb. But by early 2000, the Zip drive and most floppy drives were obsolete as it was much easier to transfer via LAN and Internet. For the home owner, systems like Time-Warner's RoadRunner made removable storage a really snails-pace method of file transfer.

                Today, I am amazed that for $40 or less, I can pop 16 Gb on a tiny little USB drive. Certainly, solid-state storage is the future and I suspect that the price will continue to drop as the will the price. Motors for hard drives are expensive and the whole idea, though highly reliable, has certain enherent problems, including power consumption and way too many components.

                And, I fondly remember Mr. Spock looking through those little colored plastic squares that contained all the reference files on the Enterprise. While we haven't leaped across the galaxy yet, I think we are just about there when it comes to media storage.

                CWS

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                • #98
                  Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                  Full course holiday meals. With the passing of my mother, aunts, and grandmother we aren't getting the full holiday meals we once cherished so much. Last Christmas we celebrated with sloppy joes. While I was grateful for having the meal with family I still missed the the turkey, dressing, country ham, etc., etc.

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                  • #99
                    Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                    Originally posted by cdia1960 View Post
                    Full course holiday meals. With the passing of my mother, aunts, and grandmother we aren't getting the full holiday meals we once cherished so much. Last Christmas we celebrated with sloppy joes. While I was grateful for having the meal with family I still missed the the turkey, dressing, country ham, etc., etc.
                    I'm sorry for the loss of all those loving relatives who made such memorable holiday meals. I remember when you wrote that post about eating sloppy joes, I thought it was the result of hard times. I learned to cook years ago, partly to ease the workload on my Mom and my Mother inlaw and partly so I would be able to carry on the traditions when they were gone. Making a turkey with stuffing and gravy is not rocket science, although it does take some preparation. Cooking is not a "woman's" job either, men make great cooks and chefs. Consider giving it a try, doesn't have to be Thanksgiving either. I'd be glad to give you step by step instructions, just ask. Start your own traditions, you have a lot of years ahead to enjoy. Frank.

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                    • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                      Here are a couple that may not disappear but are already getting hard to find.

                      The first is - work ethic. When I started in engineering, I was always in the office, volunteered for every tough assignment (hoping that I would learn something AND impress the boss) and when I wasn't working, I was at home studying. I put in more study hours after graduating than I did in school. At this point, I've been the boss for a long time now. These days, at 5 o'clock the kids are the first to clear out, whether they're on schedule or not. Very sad, mostly for them. You only really learn when you're busting your *ss.

                      The second is - real craftsmanship. I went into a high end furniture store before Christmas with my girlfriend. She wanted a small round coffee table. The store will remain nameless, but what I saw there was utter crap, with dust nits in the finish, second rate joinery, and even the wood was all flat-sawn cheap crap. Maybe no one cares anymore. Again, how terribly sad.

                      She got her coffee table. It took two weeks to build, finish and rub out. "No Way" I was going to spend, or let her spend, $2k on a piece of crap from that "high end" store. I'm sure you can still buy craftsmanship, but like I said, it is getting harder to find.

                      Comment


                      • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                        Regarding work ethic, I don't want to down college educated folks but some who have not been able to find employment in their chosen field and had to settle for other work are not very happy and it shows. When I was given the opportunity to be a telephone lineman, I busted my butt to prove my worth to the guys who were already there. I always made the effort and never wanted to be thought of as lazy, unfortunately we started getting some young guys on the job who did not want to be there. They had college degrees and had to settle for the job I was proud to have. There attitudes were terrible and very few made any effort to learn. I think as a society we need college educated people, but we also need skilled tradespeople as well as laborers. We have a lot of catching up to do, if we are to pull ourselves back from the brink.

                        Comment


                        • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                          I hear you. For the economy to work, you need every position on the team filled. You need someone working with a shovel, someone designing the shovel, someone trucking shovels to shovel distributors, someone keeping the truck running, someone building the truck ... and someone designing the truck. You can't field a football team if all you have is quarterbacks. And you can't field the team if all you have are linemen, or cornerbacks, or punters. You need the entire team, including the front office staff (well, unless you're the Raiders).

                          I do see that you felt that their attitude was disrespectful to you and others, and for some of them it may have been. But try to see it from their point of view. Imagine that you were a professional tradesperson, worked your *ss off for 4, 5 or 8 years to get an *entry* level job in that field, and then had to take a job digging a ditch. I don't want to make an excuse for a poor work ethic - there is no excuse for that in any case. But realistically there is no way you would be too happy digging that ditch. Just like people that busted hump to earn their college degree wouldn't necessarily be too happy about doing something they weren't interested in and that had nothing to do with their degree that just took them 4, 5 or 8 years to get. And they have maybe $80k in college loans to pay off. Not so good.

                          We're all human - the disappointment and frustration is bound to show in a person's attitude. Again, no excuse for a poor work ethic but you have to admit that it's a bitter pill to swallow.

                          I personally thing it's tragic that folks that have worked to be trained or schooled in any legitimate skill, profession or trade should not be able to make a living in the field they worked so hard to earn. I look at my kids and I ache for them. I think our generation has it pretty hard but I know with chilling certainty that with industry in serious decline and the government on a spending spree that is going to catch up to everyone pretty soon, our kids are looking at a much harder time than we ever faced.
                          Last edited by Andy_M; 01-05-2010, 03:35 AM.

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                          • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                            Regarding work ethic, I don't want to down college educated folks but some who have not been able to find employment in their chosen field and had to settle for other work are not very happy and it shows. When I was given the opportunity to be a telephone lineman, I busted my butt to prove my worth to the guys who were already there. I always made the effort and never wanted to be thought of as lazy, unfortunately we started getting some young guys on the job who did not want to be there. They had college degrees and had to settle for the job I was proud to have. There attitudes were terrible and very few made any effort to learn. I think as a society we need college educated people, but we also need skilled tradespeople as well as laborers. We have a lot of catching up to do, if we are to pull ourselves back from the brink.

                            Sir, I am the very persona of what you just described. One thing that needs to be understood is this: Throughout our entire lives, our parents have harped, stomped, and clapped to drill into our skulls how important getting a higher education is so don't have to end up digging ditches. To put it in a better way, the lines of work you mentioned to be a source of pride, are instead used as a warning, a threat, and a punishment for the rest of us!. Is it any suprise why the younger guys act the way they do?

                            Think about it, how would you feel if you invested thousands of dollars, and years of your life into getting an education, only to be told, "Here, lug this up the pole for me." when you came out the other end? I had to work 30 hours a week and enlist in the military, all while going to community college full time just to earn my Associates. Not to mention the things I had to give up at a young age to afford the time to do such things, like dating, socialising, and seeing the world. All this for the hope of landing a line of work that requires the use not just my hands, but my head as well.

                            Instead, for months after graduating, I applied for as many careers as I could, until finally having to settle for a nine dollar an hour apprenticeship. That was a bitter pill to swallow, but swallow it I did, for a line of work where at the start I was little more than a tool carrier. What stung wasn't so much the low pay, or even the hard work, those I didn't mind; it was the fact of having to fork over another two grand for tools and code classes, just to enter such a low wage position, meanwhile there were others who didn't have to work as hard for the same amount of income. Not to mention I did apply for an apprenticeship at an amusement park that was offereing twice the pay to start. But, being in the military shot that possibility down.

                            I admit, at the time, I knew full well that just because I was a college grad, I was not going to get that "dream job", as well as entering the workforce just in time for that last recession, that opportunities were going to be scarce, even non-existant. However, I rolled up my sleeves and went to work in an industry where, as hard as it is, at the very least my time is accounted for. Unfortunately now, just to give the proverbial dagger a quarter twist, I'm about to test for my journeyman license, just in time for this economic collapse. So forgive me if I am not in the best of moods.

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                            • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                              Tailgunner, disappointment comes in many forms and we all have stories. I went to a trade high school for the "Printing" industry. I got very good grades and was told I would be working in a lucrative trade upon graduation. The last year of school we were allowed to work half a day in the trade and I soon found out it was a father/son thing. Unless you had an in to a Union shop the rest of the jobs paid minimum wage. Four years down the drain. I applied to the Electrical workers Union and Plumbers Unions in NYC, and I was high on the list when they decided to hire hundreds of minorites back in the early seventies, shot down again. Finally I got a job at the telephone company and worked four years as a frameman wiring switches. I did a good job, then they had a cutback and I was downgraded along with a couple hundred other folks and had my salary cut three thousand dollars a year as I began my new career as a "garageman" cleaning toilets and gassing up trucks. I hung in there for three years and eventually became a garage mechanic and finally a lineman. I can imagine your disappointment in the system, in life, the raw deal, but being angry does not change the situation and it does not allow you to enjoy the bigger gift of life. I was not in a good mood throughout those events, and the only one I hurt was myself. Looking back, as my attitude improved so did my life. I decided that no matter where I was or what I did I would try and do my best. It did not happen overnight, you don't wipe away years of effort and expectation and suddenly accept a crappy reality. The older linemen used to joke around and referred to the sledge hammer, spade, and scoop shovel and tamper as the "tools of ignorance", they said if you had a better education you wouldn't be stuck using them. All I know is that crappy job those angry, disappointed college guys had to settle for, afforded me the opportunity to buy a house and raise a family and send my daughters to college. Personally, I would rather have my daughters earn far less money and work at menial jobs, if it meant being happy. Life is all about being happy and enjoying the moment. Tailgunner, right now you are young and strong and healthy, if you can't adjust your attitude now to accept your situation and start enjoying life and all the good around you things won't get better as the years go by. I'm talking as an older man who respects your efforts but wants you to strike while the iron is hot and chase after life and love, instead of being angry and upset. You have one shot at "today", don't throw it away!

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                              • Re: The Future-What will disappear?

                                I would try to enjoy life, if I had the time to do it. I feel like history is repeating itself, back in late 2002, I marched out of that instituion, certificate in hand, into a bad economy while the war drums were beating off into the distance. Sure enough, I was whisked off to the sunny skys and long beaches of the middle east early 2003. Today, once again, here I am at the point of testing for my license to enter an even worse economy, AND going to be shipped off to "WTF-istan" in the near future for a duration that has yet to be determined! (Meaning God knows how long). I just hope I don't run over a landmine.


                                Oh, to be on topic, one thing that will disappear, California's west coast. Falling into the ocean would seem quite the biblical end to such a community.

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