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National Priorities Project

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  • #16
    Re: National Priorities Project

    Taxes, employee benefits, employee entitlements, licensing fees, fuel costs, insurance costs or whatever else you want to list are all part of the cost of sales. All costs of sales plus all burdens attached to them are eventually charged to and paid for by the end consumers.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: National Priorities Project STAY SANE

      Stop feeding the troll !
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: National Priorities Project

        So if corporate taxes are cut, who foots the bill since we all know government budgets don't get cut. Someone has to pay.

        If all corporate taxes were abolished, would consumers see prices drop on all goods and services? And would these savings offset the increase in taxes the individuals would pick up?

        Cutting federal corporate taxes, which again is the sixth lowest rate in the world, is a tax hike for individuals.

        Why shouldn't a corporation pay for public services?

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        • #19
          Re: National Priorities Project

          Originally posted by SpiffPeters View Post

          Why shouldn't a corporation pay for public services?
          they do in the fact that they pay the tax or the fee that is required, but since it is a cost of business, that fee or tax is then added in to the expense column of the chart and is added to the cost of the product or service being produced,

          every good business pays his auto tax, gas tax, and sales tax, and property taxes that are required, but when it is said and done it is added to the cost of doing business, and the price they charges is higher than if they were not taxed, so the cost of the tax is then payed by the service preformed or product sold. (the cost of the tax is passed on to the customer),
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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          • #20
            Re: National Priorities Project

            Originally posted by SpiffPeters View Post
            So if corporate taxes are cut, who foots the bill since we all know government budgets don't get cut. Someone has to pay.

            If all corporate taxes were abolished, would consumers see prices drop on all goods and services? And would these savings offset the increase in taxes the individuals would pick up?

            Cutting federal corporate taxes, which again is the sixth lowest rate in the world, is a tax hike for individuals.

            Why shouldn't a corporation pay for public services?
            I suspect Corporate taxes will go up and some are even talking about a VAT taxes. However, let's at least be honest about it. The VAT tax will hurt those who have the least and the Corporate tax will cost all of us more money. The problem is we don't talk about money any more. Instead we talk about taxes like it is found money.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: National Priorities Project

              Originally posted by Andy_M View Post
              IF you share a vehicle for personal and business use, you are required by IRS code to maintain a log of your actual miles driven for business purposes and scale all vehicle expenses accordingly. Yes, this is a pain but many small business owners do this. Should you get audited and you don't have the log, the deduction will be disallowed, and iif it's a fair amount of money the IRS will go back to past years and disallow those, too... charging you interest on what you owed from the day you owed it. Once nailed, most folks that share the vehicle for personal use will start carrying the log in their glove box.

              If you decide to falsify the log, better work hard at it... the IRS knows to correlate your vehicle expenses (for which receipts are required) against mileage. Pretty hard to fool them in an audit.
              I think compliance on these things is probably less than you would estimate, not necessarily out of malice but out of sloppiness.

              Even being able to scale it is a convenience. If I could deduct 50% of a car, because I drove it to work; I wouldn't mind at all. If you can share the care expense, it is subsidizing your personal travel no matter what; since you are going to need a car anyway.

              I don't think it makes sense to try 'sticking' it to business. If consumer's aren't paying the taxes, the owners (who are people too) are paying for it. That doesn't mean that particularly for small businesses, there aren't some advantages.

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              • #22
                Re: National Priorities Project

                I have drank the Kook Aid...

                And I now believe in trickle down economics....
                411 Plumb Appliance Stimulus Package

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                • #23
                  Re: National Priorities Project

                  And all this discussion ignores the underlying problem which is a government that keeps on spending money that neither they, nor we have. If you want taxes to go down then you need to stop spending money. Taxing businesses will only drive businesses to other more tax friendly locations.
                  sigpic

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                  • #24
                    Re: National Priorities Project

                    Have these "deficits" gotten to the point of just being an unattainable theoretical number that is used for people's agendas when mentioning them?

                    J.C.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: National Priorities Project

                      I think that overall the tax burden when applied at the corporate level has less of an impact on the individual than were the individual to assume the full load (no corporate taxes).

                      Without the corporate tax structure, the added tax burden placed on the individual would be greater than a corporate tax that trickles down through a corporations goods and services.

                      As a consumer, I consider it a 'use tax'. They could simply have a higher tax rate for individual, but I would rather pay a 'corporate tax' on the goods and services I actually use.

                      JC - Yes deficits all of a sudden matter. It wasn't all that many years ago when it was stated that deficits don't matter. Where was the outrage, protests and threats then? The cry rings hollow now. It is simply a convenient excuse. They had their chance to practice fiscal restraint and they failed miserably. Credit card republicans. They have no room on which to lecture fiscal policy.
                      Last edited by SpiffPeters; 04-07-2010, 09:28 PM.

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                      • #26
                        Re: National Priorities Project

                        Originally posted by SpiffPeters View Post
                        I think that overall the tax burden when applied at the corporate level has less of an impact on the individual than were the individual to assume the full load (no corporate taxes).

                        Without the corporate tax structure, the added tax burden placed on the individual would be greater than a corporate tax that trickles down through a corporations goods and services.

                        As a consumer, I consider it a 'use tax'. They could simply have a higher tax rate for individual, but I would rather pay a 'corporate tax' on the goods and services I actually use.

                        JC - Yes deficits all of a sudden matter. It wasn't all that many years ago when it was stated that deficits don't matter. Where was the outrage, protests and threats then? The cry rings hollow now. It is simply a convenient excuse. They had their chance to practice fiscal restraint and they failed miserably. Credit card republicans. They have no room on which to lecture fiscal policy.
                        There are many "Credit Card" government people with all kinds of labels and titles that must carry the blame.

                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: National Priorities Project

                          Gee, I wonder why so may corporations are out-sourcing. We can continue to raise taxes as much as Congress wants but Corporations will need to find other ways to stay competitive or they will be over priced. If we switch that burden to an individual, they can't afford to consume products. Can you imagine what would happen to any of us if we spent way beyond out budget like Congress does?

                          Mark
                          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: National Priorities Project

                            I don't think corporate taxes are the primary motivator for outsourcing jobs. Payroll is substantially reduced in overseas workforces. At least in the case of India, the workforce is better educated.

                            Lets see, employers don't have to provide health insurance, lower wages, better educated work force. What's not to like?

                            Why don't you guys outsource? It's all the rage.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: National Priorities Project

                              Originally posted by cpw View Post
                              I think compliance on these things is probably less than you would estimate, not necessarily out of malice but out of sloppiness.

                              Even being able to scale it is a convenience. If I could deduct 50% of a car, because I drove it to work; I wouldn't mind at all. If you can share the care expense, it is subsidizing your personal travel no matter what; since you are going to need a car anyway.

                              I don't think it makes sense to try 'sticking' it to business. If consumer's aren't paying the taxes, the owners (who are people too) are paying for it. That doesn't mean that particularly for small businesses, there aren't some advantages.
                              Using a shared vehicle to commute to/from work is not deductible. Getting to work, whether it's your business or your employer's, is on your nickel. Using the vehicle FOR work, as in pickups & deliveries, service calls or whatever is deductible.

                              If hypothetically the IRS allowed people to deduct their commute as business use of the car, then virtually everyone would take the deduction. At that point where a deduction becomes widespread, it's effectively a tax cut. The revenue to the Gov't would have to be made up in some other way.

                              Compliance is certainly not complete, but look at it from the IRS perspective. A business that has dedicated vehicles gets a deduction... it's fair and equitable that a small business where the owner uses his personal vehicle for business use should get a deduction. This is the same logic behind the home office deduction. Both are abused, for sure. But what is the option? If they didn't allow shared vehicle deductions or home office deductions, many small businesspersons would be at a disadvantage compared to businesses that have dedicated vehicles. The IRS has very clear and (in these cases) reasonable rules about accounting for shared use, and if you are caught cheating, then you will pay up. They understand that many people cheat... and in fact the IRS is fairly likely to inquire (even if not in a full-blown audit) about a home office. Not so much about shared vehicle deductions, because the dollar value tends to be pretty small. But since you don't like the current system, what could they do that would be fairer or more effective?

                              As for subsidizing your personal travel... you lost me on that one. Everything is accounted for in accordance with the miles driven for work as a percentage of the total miles, so how does business use subsidizing personal use (unless someone is cheating)?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: National Priorities Project

                                Originally posted by Andy_M View Post
                                Using a shared vehicle to commute to/from work is not deductible. Getting to work, whether it's your business or your employer's, is on your nickel. Using the vehicle FOR work, as in pickups & deliveries, service calls or whatever is deductible.
                                I understand that, though a lot of businesses gettting to work is stepping out of your house.

                                Not so much about shared vehicle deductions, because the dollar value tends to be pretty small. But since you don't like the current system, what could they do that would be fairer or more effective?

                                As for subsidizing your personal travel... you lost me on that one. Everything is accounted for in accordance with the miles driven for work as a percentage of the total miles, so how does business use subsidizing personal use (unless someone is cheating)?
                                Let's say you drive 50 miles a day for work, and 10 miles a day for pleasure. You have a car payment of $300. The deductible amount is going to be $250, the non-deductible amount is $50. That is perfectly in compliance. If you didn't have that business you would probably be paying the same $300 for a car and not all expenses are really mileage based.

                                I'm not saying there is a better way to do it, but IMO it certainly provides a personal benefit. The same thing happens with company cars; though I believe some of that is supposed to be imputed income.

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