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Jobs Not Right for Me

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  • Jobs Not Right for Me

    I have to hand it to some guys and the jobs they do, not necessarily the physically or mentally demanding ones either. I sometimes picture myself doing some of these jobs and I know I wouldn't last long. Maybe some of you have similar thoughts? For example, personal trainer or massage therapist, I think my first attractive female client would be my last. How do guys do it and not get in trouble?

    Working in a good icecream or sweet shop, or good restaurant. Fired, or dead in a week from overeating.

    Therapist, sorry, I have no patience for complainers. My theory is man up and move on. The suicide hotlines would light up from all of my patients.

    I give a lot of you tradesmen credit for dealing with the public, I can't stand the public! Maybe it's a good thing I'm retired?

  • #2
    Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

    Every now and then, I get a women who wants to flirt, and take my focus off of the task at hand which is..being paid!

    I once had a woman lay right next to me while I was under a sink working, and having a full fledge conversation with me. Oh..btw..on the way to that sink, I saw her collection of dildo's sprawled across the bed!!

    From video camera's pointing at beds, to half naked women...I've seen it.

    But as hard as it might be, I always keep my composure, as I don't need my name in the paper for negative reasons.

    Dealing with customers can be very "trying" at times, and I only lost my cool one time with a customer in 25 years. Yelling and screaming to "myself" in the truck after I leave a job...happens quite often.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

      My wife worked at Baskin Robbins scooping ice cream as a teenager. At first, she gained a bunch of weight but then after a few months she started to hate ice cream. She rarely eats it now because of that over exposure to it.

      I was talking to one of my customers that is a massgae therapist. I told her how lucky her husband must be because of all the free massages he must get. She said she has NEVER given him a masssage

      I've made people vomit because they saw me stick my bare hand in a toilet and pull out an old tampon but I've also past out when getting a few stitches in my hand...go figure I guess it's all what you get used to seeing and doing.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

        Originally posted by plumberscrack View Post
        My wife worked at Baskin Robbins scooping ice cream as a teenager. At first, she gained a bunch of weight but then after a few months she started to hate ice cream. She rarely eats it now because of that over exposure to it.

        I was talking to one of my customers that is a massgae therapist. I told her how lucky her husband must be because of all the free massages he must get. She said she has NEVER given him a masssage

        I've made people vomit because they saw me stick my bare hand in a toilet and pull out an old tampon but I've also past out when getting a few stitches in my hand...go figure I guess it's all what you get used to seeing and doing.
        Before I retired I looked into becoming a massage therapist, expensive and tough training. I asked a few women I was friendly with at the gym what they thought, and they said they would never have a male masseur. In truth, men who are used to getting a massage, want the power of a man working out their muscles. I don't think I'm a homophobe, but I don't want to touch another guy. Massage therapist profession cancelled!

        Poop, vomit and all that, no problem. Why is it the so called dream jobs are either out of reach or not what we anticipate?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

          I discovered my own personal "Hell" of sorts when I returned from active duty overseas: Temporary receiver for a local supermarket "PriceRite".
          My God, all day and sometimes night long, I man the back of a powerjack to unload trailers into a stockroom. Back and forth, back and forth, all shift long, same thing everyday to the point I could feel my braincells leaping, like lemmings off cliff, to their deaths from my ears. I would have given anything to become activated again for another tour to wire up tent cities than unload another trailer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

            I could never be a toilet paper salesman.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

              I've had a variety of jobs before I started my career as an illustrator. Some fun, some tough, some just sort of "suck it up, and do your best".

              When I was about 12, my Dad started taking me on his night and weekend "jobs". Basically the "gofor", but also helped him with the plumbing and heating jobs he did. That was back with lead pots and hemp and blow torches and lots of pipe cutting and threading. No plastic anywhere. I sort of liked the occasional carpentry, didn't mind the heating work, but boy did I hate the plumbing. Today, I simply won't do it, and will gladly make the phone call. God bless plumbers, I have great respect for them, but it's not for me.

              I worked on a farm for several summers. Worst job was cleaning the barn... backing that "spreader" down between the stalls and shoveling out the trenches. Now that was nasty, but not nearly as bad as my plumbing experience!

              I worked for a restaurant for about a year, it was the most fun I ever had on a job. Waitresses were great and the boss was fun to work for. Learned a lot about life there, but we weren't allowed to "snack". You get caught eating when it wasn't your break, and you could kiss that job good-bye.

              I worked in a factory for a couple of years. I was an inspector, working on an assembly floor where we made junk for the auto industry. Cables for those "push-button" Mopar transmission selectors. I also did the prototype inspection for the flex-shaft for Mustang excellerators and later handled the second and third shift inspection of their assembly. I finally quite, as I was sick of "engineering" constantly overiding inspection failures with their "EC's". Quality Control doesn't mean much, when Engineering makes changes to allow the errors to not hinder the weekly output.

              I then worked for the main office of an insurance company. First time in a big office building, where I had to wear a tie and sport coat. I was in "data processing" where I worked on an IBM 1401 system as "data maintenance clerk". At the end of each month, I got to play with a bunch of machines, but for the other three weeks I punched little holes in data cards. That was undoubtedly the most boring job I ever had. But learning about the whole process and learning the function and use of all those machines proved to be a big help when I went into the Technical Publications business.

              I love illustrating and that's where I spent my career. Basically, it's just drawing pictures of machines: exploded view drawings for parts lists and any number of things for instruction manuals, including schematics, photos, illustrations and even cartoons. Loved it and it all worked well for a couple of decades. Nice part was that I could go wherever the "vacuum" took me. Learned every facet of the business and then some. Lot's of freelancing too, and always a new challenge.

              But then I got a "beauracrat" for a boss... a guy who's "20-years of experience" was really only one year, which he insisted on repeating over and over. For him it was all about "reports" and "schedules". He didn't know sh!t about the business, but he had a degree, which made him boss. He sat in his office all day, with a perfectly clean desk. He even brought a thermos, so he didn't have to mix with any of us coffee machine types. The only time he'd leave his office was to go the men's room at 2:00 (you could set your watch by it). Every day, he'd show up and 7:50 and leave at exactly 5:00... the only way you would know he was there was that you could see his coathanger swinging. Everything he knew about the day came from his boss, and our written reports and schedules and the Friday afternoon meeting where he'd dress us all out for any minute differences between our schedule and our weekly reports.

              That job, with that boss, was the nightmare of my life. I still have nightmares of it (really) and often it wakes me in the middle of the night... my Doc says it's "Post Traumatic Stress" (I thought you only got that if you spent time in Iraq or Afganistan). If I had been single I would have walked, but with kid in college, a stay-at-home wife, and a mortgage, one simply bites the bullet.

              I highly respect people who work hard, go through too-long hours, and manage to make the best of what they have. No job, regardless of how menial, is disrespectful or without it merits. I appreciate what people are capable of, but I'm also well educated in the lowly, trivial BS that some are capable of too.

              CWS

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

                Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                I've had a variety of jobs before I started my career as an illustrator. Some fun, some tough, some just sort of "suck it up, and do your best".

                When I was about 12, my Dad started taking me on his night and weekend "jobs". Basically the "gofor", but also helped him with the plumbing and heating jobs he did. That was back with lead pots and hemp and blow torches and lots of pipe cutting and threading. No plastic anywhere. I sort of liked the occasional carpentry, didn't mind the heating work, but boy did I hate the plumbing. Today, I simply won't do it, and will gladly make the phone call. God bless plumbers, I have great respect for them, but it's not for me.

                I worked on a farm for several summers. Worst job was cleaning the barn... backing that "spreader" down between the stalls and shoveling out the trenches. Now that was nasty, but not nearly as bad as my plumbing experience!

                I worked for a restaurant for about a year, it was the most fun I ever had on a job. Waitresses were great and the boss was fun to work for. Learned a lot about life there, but we weren't allowed to "snack". You get caught eating when it wasn't your break, and you could kiss that job good-bye.

                I worked in a factory for a couple of years. I was an inspector, working on an assembly floor where we made junk for the auto industry. Cables for those "push-button" Mopar transmission selectors. I also did the prototype inspection for the flex-shaft for Mustang excellerators and later handled the second and third shift inspection of their assembly. I finally quite, as I was sick of "engineering" constantly overiding inspection failures with their "EC's". Quality Control doesn't mean much, when Engineering makes changes to allow the errors to not hinder the weekly output.

                I then worked for the main office of an insurance company. First time in a big office building, where I had to wear a tie and sport coat. I was in "data processing" where I worked on an IBM 1401 system as "data maintenance clerk". At the end of each month, I got to play with a bunch of machines, but for the other three weeks I punched little holes in data cards. That was undoubtedly the most boring job I ever had. But learning about the whole process and learning the function and use of all those machines proved to be a big help when I went into the Technical Publications business.

                I love illustrating and that's where I spent my career. Basically, it's just drawing pictures of machines: exploded view drawings for parts lists and any number of things for instruction manuals, including schematics, photos, illustrations and even cartoons. Loved it and it all worked well for a couple of decades. Nice part was that I could go wherever the "vacuum" took me. Learned every facet of the business and then some. Lot's of freelancing too, and always a new challenge.

                But then I got a "beauracrat" for a boss... a guy who's "20-years of experience" was really only one year, which he insisted on repeating over and over. For him it was all about "reports" and "schedules". He didn't know sh!t about the business, but he had a degree, which made him boss. He sat in his office all day, with a perfectly clean desk. He even brought a thermos, so he didn't have to mix with any of us coffee machine types. The only time he'd leave his office was to go the men's room at 2:00 (you could set your watch by it). Every day, he'd show up and 7:50 and leave at exactly 5:00... the only way you would know he was there was that you could see his coathanger swinging. Everything he knew about the day came from his boss, and our written reports and schedules and the Friday afternoon meeting where he'd dress us all out for any minute differences between our schedule and our weekly reports.

                That job, with that boss, was the nightmare of my life. I still have nightmares of it (really) and often it wakes me in the middle of the night... my Doc says it's "Post Traumatic Stress" (I thought you only got that if you spent time in Iraq or Afganistan). If I had been single I would have walked, but with kid in college, a stay-at-home wife, and a mortgage, one simply bites the bullet.

                I highly respect people who work hard, go through too-long hours, and manage to make the best of what they have. No job, regardless of how menial, is disrespectful or without it merits. I appreciate what people are capable of, but I'm also well educated in the lowly, trivial BS that some are capable of too.

                CWS
                CWS, For a minute there, I thought you were going to say you couldn't hold a job. I had a boss like your last one, too. Lucky for me, I was able to retire before he drove me nuts. (Some still wonder about that)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

                  Jobs with alot of office politics, red tape, people unqualified that have become hired for some reason, large organizations where unproductive people can "hide" in the system.

                  I have quiet control under the house.


                  J.C.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Jobs Not Right for Me

                    I started my "illustrator" career when I was 20, working with one company for eight and half years and then the big industry for 30 years, retiring from that when I was 59. Long enough to still be able to hold on to a wee bit of my sanity.

                    From 17 to 24, well... that was a few jobs, trying to find the meaning of work life I guess.

                    Congrats on your retirement!

                    CWS

                    Comment

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