Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Marble care

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Marble care

    How can restore marble floors to bring back its original shine?

  • #2
    Re: Marble care

    As I recall, marble is fairly porouse and can stain if not sealed properly. It's not as hard as granite either, if I recall correctly. But all natural stone can stain or become dull over time, as the finish grind/polish begins to accumulate small scatches.

    I don't have any experience with marble, other than reading of course. But I would think it can be polished (not waxed) with a very fine abasive material designed for the task. That would probably require an application or two and the use of a hand buffer. I'd advise checking with a local retailer that sells marble tile or doing a search on Google of "marble floor polish" or "Marble floor restoration". Both Home Depot and Lowe's should carry or at least be knowledgeable about such products. (I bought a sealer for my granite floor, that they recommended.)

    I'm sure other forum members will jump in here with their more experienced advice, as I know we have several members who seem to be knowledgeable about almost everything.

    Sorry this isn't more helpful, but welcome to the Ridgid forum and may you and your family have a great Thanksgiving,

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Marble care

      Thanks Smith for such a generous reply! Really helpful...and last but not the least wish you and all a very happy Thanksgiving! With a big THANKS in Thanksgiving!! Take care

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Marble care

        Can anyone tell me whether Marble and Concrete are related to each other in anyway?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Marble care

          Google the following:
          Caring for marble and granite
          Lots of information there.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Marble care

            Are Marble and Concrete related in any way?

            Well, in a small way, Yes.

            Marble is one of many "stones" which are formed naturally over millions of years. It is found in many areas for the U.S. and in many different countries. Each area has it's own general properties, regarding color and pattern. For example, Vermont is well known for it's white marble.

            In all cases (that I know of), marble must be "quaried", cut from its natural area of formation, and is then cut, ground, sculpted, polished or whatever, to make the final object or product.

            Marble is formed from Limestone, as I recall, after going through some chemical changes and geological pressure. Marble is also a source for calcium, one of the ingredients of cement, which is used to make concrete. (It's not the only source of calcium though, as I recall.)

            Concrete is NOT a natural occurance. It is a formulation of several different natural occuring ingredients and can be found as far back in time as the ancient Egyptians. Modern concrete is a mixture of Portland Cement (which contains a large percentage of calcium and gypsum), and varying amounts of other chemicals and materials, depending on it's application. Different formulations of "concrete" have different physical properties and thus can be produced to meet the demands of particular applications. For example, highway concrete may well be different than the concrete formulated for a building structure.

            Whatever the formulation, the ingredients are mixed with water to a very specific percentage and everything is mixed and then poured or placed as necessary (it can be injected, troweled, shoveled, etc.) Over a short period of time (relatively speaking) this mixture will "set" and solidify. Basically speaking, a chemical reaction takes place within the mixture and the various ingreadients will "bond" to each other, forming a rock-like structure.

            So, Marble is purchases as a stone product, like tile or architectural embellishents, headstones, monuments, etc. Concrete can be purchased as a premixed product, delivered and poured from a specialized truck, or you can buy a bag which can then be mixed on site and poured. In either case, one purchases the product for a specific purpose that is matched by a specific formulation or "mix".

            I hope this helps,

            CWS
            Last edited by CWSmith; 12-01-2010, 01:30 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Marble care

              Ya definitely it helped! Thanks for the information! Great read!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Marble care

                Here's some information on another kind of concrete.
                http://www.romanconcrete.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Marble care

                  Thanks!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Marble care

                    Marble is made from compressed minerals and capable of taking a high polish. It comes in many colors depending upon the minerals it is composed of. Marble today is used for floors and countertops and is usually laid in tiles that come in many sizes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Marble Care

                      What cleans water stains from Marble floor?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Marble care

                        Merry Christmas to all : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLKrw...eature=related

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Marble care

                          Gloria,

                          Merry Christmas to you too.

                          I think a lot depends on what's in the water that left the stain. For example iron rust would be treated differently than calcium or salt, etc.

                          Often vinegar will remove hard water stains, though I must admit it might leave an undesireable odor. You could try some of the products that are used for removal of dishwasher spots if the stains are light.

                          There are also product for iron and rust stain. Here in our area, we use a product called "Iron-Out". It comes in powder form. We have so much iron in our water that it actually turn the toilet tank black. A tablespoon of "Iron Out" will complete clean this, leaving the tank spotless. I've used it to remove rust stains from the patio and sidewalk.

                          So, it depends on what's in the water that caused the stain.

                          CWS

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Marble Care

                            Thanks Smith! Enjoy!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Marble care

                              Wish you all a very HAPPY NEW YEAR! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BSEO...eature=related

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X