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  • diabetes?

    I Know i've read that several of our regulars get to deal with it on a daily basis and i'm kind of curious as to what I can expect.
    I got some kind of stomach bug late wednesday evening, and had to make an ER trip thursday evening. turns out after some lab tests they figure it was just a stomach bug of some sort, but my glucose level was 125, having not ingested anything more substantial than water for close to 24 hours. apparently anything from 100-125 is considered pre-diabetic, and 126+ is just diabetic.

    I do have an appointment with a non ER doc to have the same test run again but it isn't for a month.
    No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

  • #2
    Re: diabetes?

    A blood sugar of 125 is nothing to be concerned about and can be controlled with diet and exercise. With lots of injections of insulin I am pleased when I can keep it in the 100-120 range. The danger is always that you will take too much insulin and end up with a low blood sugar which is not fun. My 10-year old grandson has trouble keeping his blood sugar under 300 which could start causing damage to his vascular system, kidneys and vision.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #3
      Re: diabetes?

      thanks mark, good to know, the other thing that my wife reminded me of is that my creatinine level was "rather high for my age" which he said was an indicator of kidney function.

      at this point i'm not Overly concerned, but if it's out of whack at my age now, I really ought to get a handle on it now.
      No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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      • #4
        Re: diabetes?

        Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
        thanks mark, good to know, the other thing that my wife reminded me of is that my creatinine level was "rather high for my age" which he said was an indicator of kidney function.

        at this point i'm not Overly concerned, but if it's out of whack at my age now, I really ought to get a handle on it now.

        What was your creatinine level at?

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: diabetes?

          he didn't say :-/ just that it was high for my age. Guess I'll find out on the 20th if it's something I need to worry about or not. I can call monday and see if they'll release the results to me.
          No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: diabetes?

            Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
            he didn't say :-/ just that it was high for my age. Guess I'll find out on the 20th if it's something I need to worry about or not. I can call monday and see if they'll release the results to me.
            Normal is about 1.0 to 1.2 while failure is 2.0 and above. I was 7.2 when I received my transplant and I'm 2.2 post transplant.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: diabetes?

              I`ve had type 2 diabetes for over ten years now which is hereditary and sometimes it is hard to control but I manage, go out and buy a book called Diabetes for Dummies, (I know it sounds silly) but I found it helped me a lot and will explain what you need to do and everything about diabetes in the simplest terms and you can learn at your own pace and as you do you will have more confidence and know you are not alone as diabetes is an epidemic all over the world.

              Tony

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              • #8
                Re: diabetes?

                Books on the subject certainly can be helpful as well as advice from those who also have Diabetes. But, and this is a big BUT, the person(s) you must listen too and who's advice will be the most beneficial to you is that of your doctors. Diabetes affects different people differently so the treatment can be very personalized.
                Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                • #9
                  Re: diabetes?

                  I've been a Type II diabetic for a close to 12 years. A glucose count of 125 shouldn't be a big deal for most people and isn't necessarily a sign that you are "diabetic". My glucose level is well controlled with pill prescrition, 2 at night and 1 in the morning. I take "my blood" once a day, in the morning when I get up and it generally is right aroung 100.... which is the target. Problem for me was simply gaining too much weight, not eating properly, and not enough exercise. Basically, I inherited it from my mother; and unfortunately, I passed it on to my son.

                  For me, weight is the issue and I've been pretty "skinny" for much of my life. (I weighed 120 lbs when I got married at 23... and was only up to 140 until I hit my late 30's. But with the advent of the computer, my job found me sitting a lot more and with just sitting I found myself snacking more too. By my late 50's, I was hitting 200 lbs. . I'm presently at 178, and that difference has made my blood sugar better regulated. My biggest problem today is remembering that I have to eat something every three or four hours to keep my blood from dropping too low. (Like yesterday afternoon when it dropped to 70!)

                  Unfortunately for my son, he's not at all active and his weight tops 200. In his early 40's he's already been diagnosed as a Type II. Hopefully it will scare him enough to put him on the right track.

                  I was diagnosed as being hypo-glycemic in my late 40's. Basically that was like an over-reaction to sugar/carbs. You eat, your sugar goes up dramatically in a very short time (like almost within the hour), then your body detects the quick rise and provides a reaction of it's own insulin... thus causing a dramatic drop in my sugar level. For months I felt really sick, and as the Doc described, it was because I was on this constant glucose rollercoaster... up and down thoughout my day. The corrective action for that was to cut out all the sugar and high carbs and eat a lot more protien, with smaller meals/snacks every three hours or so, to keep my glucose level. But of course, eating more often for me didn't necessarily mean eating less and that didn't help with the weight gain.

                  One thing I do know, and Badger Dave got it right... everybody is different. Even my son and I have different reactions to certain foods and my sugar has never gotten as high as his, nor does it react dramatically to things like bread, pizza, potatoes and certain other "carbs" the way his does. For me, these kind of carbs have little short-term reaction; but, I stay away from any intake of "sugar" in it's pure form. That I feel almost immediately! I also have a friend who is seriously diabetic (type 1) and is on insulin. Her sugar swings are insane, and is often several 100 (like I mean 700, 800, and higher). She's passed out a few times and at 72, I'm surprised she's still alive. Frankly, I don't think she "gets it", as she still eats candy, ice cream, etc. and her blood swings are to extremes. She says she doesn't feel well, unless her sugar count is up to at least 200! (She scares the hell out my wife and I, as I know we'll get a phone call about her passing, one day. But, you can't tell her anything!

                  The one thing I've noticed (and it could be a reaction to your not eating for such a long time), is that if I forget to eat something before bed my sugar will be higher in the morning (like 120 to 140). If I eat something, it will pretty much be around 100, where it should be. But on days when I need to fast (like before my quarterly blood test), my glucose count is always higher in the morning. The Doc, explains this simply as a "bounce"... basically my sugar level will drop to a level where my body will kick in with it's own sugar supply to drive my glucose back up. It doesn't seem to be able to do this very well during the day, especially when I'm running around or working hard... (I think it does, but I'm probably just using it up). During the day (like yesterday) I'll be fine and then all of a sudden I feel really tired and unsteady, and I'll immediately know my glucose level is really down. (A "hypo-glycemic" moment?).

                  In any case, your doctor will probably have to give you a glucose-tolerance test or whatever they do now days. I may be wrong, but I think in most cases diabeties can be well controlled without extremes, especially if you have no history of it in your family. Unless you have some extreme family history, I wouldn't worry too much as "diabeties" doesn't mean the end of the world... it just means you need to pay closer attention to your eating and exercise and weight and you'll be okay. Hopefully, things will be alright for you.

                  I hope this helps,

                  CWS

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