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  • Advice

    If someone you knew is 16 with the ability to do anything and no strong focus toward a particular subject:

    What advice would you give them in regards to future occupations for them to pursue?

    Thanks.


    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Advice

    One of our local financial gurus was talking about that on the ray-didio not too long ago. According to the info he relayed, studying to be a pharmacist offers about the best bang for the buck right now. Relatively low cost get there (education and licensing), high in demand, and highly favorable salary even for a freshly minted grad.

    Being a pharmacist isn't exactly a chick magnet though. And at 16, that's gotta be the priority.
    "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Advice

      Oilfield. No student loan, and good money. If I didn't do Plumbing, that's where I would be.
      Will Rogers Plumbing
      Moore, Oklahoma
      (
      405) 323-2852

      "Your Solution for Any Sewer and Drain Cleaning Needs"

      "We Unclog Drains That Others Can't"



      www.willrogersplumbing.com
      http://willrogersplumbing.com/?page_id=8

      "Oklahoma's Favorite Plumbers!"

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      • #4
        Re: Advice

        Sixteen is about second year high school, so I would urge them to keep up the grades. If college is in their plans, volunteer and community work is something favorable the colleges look for. Does the young person like helping people, working with numbers, working outside, working with their hands? What I'm getting at is trying to fiugure out where that person would work well so you could look into job opportunities in that area.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Advice

          I would say only pick an occupation that you know you would enjoy doing on a daily basis. I know far too many people who didn't do that and almost every single one has a general negative outlook on life. All the monetary compensation in the world will not make up for hating what you do for a third of your life.
          ================================================== ====
          All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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          • #6
            Re: Advice

            Pick a job where the charictieristics of the job fit your personality and a job where you physically need to be there to perform that job, i.e. you can fix a computer in the US from India but you have to be in that house to fix the plumbing, etc.
            Buy cheap, buy twice.

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            • #7
              Re: Advice

              Also, I think a teenager shouldn't spend more then 6 months at the same job. Explore to see what else is out there.
              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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              • #8
                Re: Advice

                I would advise him to look into law as a profession.

                (1) Plenty of demand, and it will never decrease.

                (2) Probably the highest avg earning potential of the professions.

                (3) Many specialty fields to choose from.

                (4) Every case is different, which keeps it interesting.

                (5) Option to work for a firm or for yourself.

                And no, not all lawyers are bad people.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Advice

                  I think your best advice would be to tell the person to focus on their core subjects, math, english etc, this will keep the most options open for them and give them a littler longer to decide where they want to go or what they want to do after High school. I was told once a person will change their career something like on average 4 times in their lifetime or something like that. I'm on my 3rd career now and those core subjects have applied too everything I've pursued.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Advice

                    male or female 16 yr old?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Advice

                      Learn another language especially Chinese

                      Tony

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                      • #12
                        Re: Advice

                        Interesting question and definitely some interesting answers.

                        16 is tough, but I would hope the young person would have found something that they have a keen interest in by now. But I also know that there's far too many kids that are just "bored" and have yet to be satified with anything... I feel sorry for them and if that feeling doesn't change, they will most likely spend the rest of their lives like that.

                        I have to agree with Franki and Badger Dave, as others. You've got to be prepared for college and you've got to start building an image as a "go-getter". Businesses like young people who have displayed some ambition and preparation. Very important I think. is that whatever you are going to do with your life, you had better like it... so it's important that your life's work is something you can be passionate about. I think most people miss that point. For examplt, in my career I've met many young engineers who simply found the everyday task assignments to be beyond boring. Similarly, I know a young man who dreamed of being a pilot most of his youth. After a small fortune in education and training and FCC ratings, he landed a job with a commuter service. He had to keep his job at Cracker Barrel in order to pay his rent. The pay scale was ridiculously low. Today he works for one of the big airlines, but the hours make him miserable, as does the boredom of sitting in "the office" on the coast-to-coast flights. No matter what you think you want to do, it is very important to find out what the "real world" of doing that is going to be like.

                        Money of course is important, but probably not as important as doing something that makes you happy (but you can't be poor either). In today's environment it's a real crapshoot, but I think it's pretty much been like that for some time now. You simply don't know what technology, or economics, or things like "globalization" (or whatever the next key-word title is going to be) will do to a person's career.

                        I think the key to finding a career is to discover one's own needs and satisfactions. For some it's doing things with their hands, or serving others, or just solving problems. Some of us like to be outdoors or in the midst of people. The whole key is just discovering their own personal likes or dislikes.

                        CWS

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                        • #13
                          Re: Advice

                          My sister-in-law is going to law school and she is pretty down on the legal job market. She is bright and going to a decent school, but I think that lots of places are tightening their belts, even in the legal department.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Advice

                            I think Frank's idea comment about keeping good grades is important. You don't need to be at the super top, but it would be wise to keep options open.

                            I think one of the best things that happened to me was getting a job when I was 16. I think no matter what the job, getting some responsibility, etc. is a good thing for a kid. Extra spending money doesn't hurt either.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Advice

                              No one, and I means absolutely NO ONE, even cares what grades some has received in high school anymore. One of the greatest complaints from area colleges, as well as quite the number of parents, is having to deal with students whom seem completely unprepared for the collegiate level of learning, inspite of earning high grades and demonstrating the effort to learn. So much so that every colleges I toured, (UMASS, Northeastern, WPT, AIC, and yes even a local community college), instead relies on their own placement exams to determing a student's development level. Hell, I cannot recall a single employer I had an interview with mention and schooling on the high school level.

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