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  • Manzanar

    Yesterday I drove Jeanna and my grand kids out to Manzanar to see the museum. For those who do not know Manzanar was one of 10-relocation camp where over 100,000 Japanese were moved to during WWII.

    Executive Order No. 9066

    The President

    Executive Order

    Authorizing the Secretary of War to Prescribe Military Areas

    Whereas the successful prosecution of the war requires every possible protection against espionage and against sabotage to national-defense material, national-defense premises, and national-defense utilities as defined in Section 4, Act of April 20, 1918, 40 Stat. 533, as amended by the Act of November 30, 1940, 54 Stat. 1220, and the Act of August 21, 1941, 55 Stat. 655 (U.S.C., Title 50, Sec. 104);

    Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy, I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of War, and the Military Commanders whom he may from time to time designate, whenever he or any designated Commander deems such action necessary or desirable, to prescribe military areas in such places and of such extent as he or the appropriate Military Commander may determine, from which any or all persons may be excluded, and with respect to which, the right of any person to enter, remain in, or leave shall be subject to whatever restrictions the Secretary of War or the appropriate Military Commander may impose in his discretion. The Secretary of War is hereby authorized to provide for residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may be necessary, in the judgment of the Secretary of War or the said Military Commander, and until other arrangements are made, to accomplish the purpose of this order. The designation of military areas in any region or locality shall supersede designations of prohibited and restricted areas by the Attorney General under the Proclamations of December 7 and 8, 1941, and shall supersede the responsibility and authority of the Attorney General under the said Proclamations in respect of such prohibited and restricted areas.

    I hereby further authorize and direct the Secretary of War and the said Military Commanders to take such other steps as he or the appropriate Military Commander may deem advisable to enforce compliance with the restrictions applicable to each Military area hereinabove authorized to be designated, including the use of Federal troops and other Federal Agencies, with authority to accept assistance of state and local agencies.

    I hereby further authorize and direct all Executive Departments, independent establishments and other Federal Agencies, to assist the Secretary of War or the said Military Commanders in carrying out this Executive Order, including the furnishing of medical aid, hospitalization, food, clothing, transportation, use of land, shelter, and other supplies, equipment, utilities, facilities, and services.

    This order shall not be construed as modifying or limiting in any way the authority heretofore granted under Executive Order No. 8972, dated December 12, 1941, nor shall it be construed as limiting or modifying the duty and responsibility of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, with respect to the investigation of alleged acts of sabotage or the duty and responsibility of the Attorney General and the Department of Justice under the Proclamations of December 7 and 8, 1941, prescribing regulations for the conduct and control of alien enemies, except as such duty and responsibility is superseded by the designation of military areas hereunder.

    Franklin D. Roosevelt

    The White House,

    February 19, 1942.


    It was an amazing learning experience for all of us and a warning to never allow emotions to over run decency. What our government did was unwarranted and shameful.

    Manzanar National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

  • #2
    Re: Manzanar

    Mark,

    Thanks for the great post!

    Even more shameful, is that while this was going on, here on the east coast, German's were living quite nicely. One of our town's major employers was the Agfa film company. While it did get "nationalized" and became Ansco, many German's remained and in some cases lived quite luxuriously and as some of the history stories go: continued to work in the background supplying information to the Nazi government.

    Difference of course was that "Germans" look like us, while the Japanese did not and were demonized quite largely as being yellow-skinned, buck-toothed, evil little creatures who were grossly near-sighted.

    I've always been struck by the characterizations that we humans will go through for political purposes.

    Thanks again,

    CWS
    Last edited by CWSmith; 09-05-2011, 07:08 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Manzanar

      I have a friend whose father was sent to a relocation camp when he was young. The amazing part was most felt they were doing their war duty to go to the camps. Manzanar even had a large weaving factory where camouflage nets were made by internees. When given the opportunity to enlist in the Army he did and left the camp. Then 18-years later he broke his back while still serving his country and was discharged. Years later he passed away, a proud veteran of the country he loved.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Manzanar

        Years ago I worked for a sweet lady that was interned. She had just received a check for the wrong. She didn't seem bitter. Beautiful home with a bay view.
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Manzanar

          I thought you were talking about that bra Kramer invented with Frank on Seinfeld. Don't get all offended. Just saying....


          J.C.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Manzanar

            Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
            I thought you were talking about that bra Kramer invented with Frank on Seinfeld. Don't get all offended. Just saying....


            J.C.
            I believe that was a Manssiere.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Manzanar

              For anyone interested, here's some more information on the subject: Japanese American internment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

              There was a movie produced, I believe in the late 40's regarding a military unit (the 442nd Combat Regiment) that was made up of Japanese GI's who had enlisted from many of these so-called "internment camps". I believe the title was "Go For Broke", and starred Van Johnson as an officer who came to the division as a young (and quite biased) officer.

              Historically, the 442nd Combat Infantry Regiment saw service in the European campaign and was used in some of the worst combat situations known. It was the most decorated unit in U.S. history, with 21 Congressional Medals of Honor awarded. Again, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/442nd_I...(United_States) has much more detailed information.

              I'm a bit of a history buff, especially military history. It seems that we sometimes miss knowing these little bits of our past and somehow knowing that that some of our past "discriminations" were not only wrong, but proved to be the very people that would prove to be the best possible defenders of our nation. The 442nd and the "Tuskegee Airmen" proved that with outstanding records in WWII. Quite surprising I think, that we treated these two peoples such injustice and yet they were able to overcome and rise well above to serve their country in such outstanding ways, while their own rights were neglected back at home.

              Knowing these things makes me very much concerned about our present path of descrimination and our ever-increasing move to the political right. It seems at times, that we have learned nothing from our history.

              CWS

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Manzanar

                Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                For anyone interested, here's some more information on the subject: Japanese American internment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                There was a movie produced, I believe in the late 40's regarding a military unit (the 442nd Combat Regiment) that was made up of Japanese GI's who had enlisted from many of these so-called "internment camps". I believe the title was "Go For Broke", and starred Van Johnson as an officer who came to the division as a young (and quite biased) officer.

                Historically, the 442nd Combat Infantry Regiment saw service in the European campaign and was used in some of the worst combat situations known. It was the most decorated unit in U.S. history, with 21 Congressional Medals of Honor awarded. Again, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/442nd_I...(United_States) has much more detailed information.

                I'm a bit of a history buff, especially military history. It seems that we sometimes miss knowing these little bits of our past and somehow knowing that that some of our past "discriminations" were not only wrong, but proved to be the very people that would prove to be the best possible defenders of our nation. The 442nd and the "Tuskegee Airmen" proved that with outstanding records in WWII. Quite surprising I think, that we treated these two peoples such injustice and yet they were able to overcome and rise well above to serve their country in such outstanding ways, while their own rights were neglected back at home.

                Knowing these things makes me very much concerned about our present path of descrimination and our ever-increasing move to the political right. It seems at times, that we have learned nothing from our history.

                CWS
                My son Jaysen is a Major in the Army and just received his Masters in Military Arts and Science. He also has a minor in history and hopes to be a history teacher when he retires from the Army. Because he is a pilot he is a real aviation buff. A few years ago I was at a hotel in Santa Maria where they were doing a vintage air show behind the hotel. When I told him I met two of the original Tuskegee Airmen he was green with envy. They were in Uniform and when they entered the elevator with me I had a feeling come over me I can't even explain. They were small in stature but enormous in so many other ways.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Manzanar

                  When I was a kid we used to pass a series of concrete slabs off of the side of I-15. I asked what they were and my dad replied "that's where one of the interment camps were during the war". My dad fought in the south Pacific and hated Japs until the day he died.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Manzanar

                    Originally posted by Abbott View Post
                    When I was a kid we used to pass a series of concrete slabs off of the side of I-15. I asked what they were and my dad replied "that's where one of the interment camps were during the war". My dad fought in the south Pacific and hated Japs until the day he died.
                    The sad part was over 2/3 of those interned were US citizens. Only those on the west coast were sent to the camps while the rest were considered okay. All these years later, not a single case of espionage from any Japanese in the US was ever found.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Manzanar

                      Actually, the demarcation line reached into Arizona. Those Japanese who lived on the North/West side of Grand Avenue (US 60), also lost their liberty and most of their property.

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