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  • union question

    i am running new air lines in my shop but i am stumped at this point, main line is 1" galv with tees at the drops going down to the point that i want them at. i want the down lines to be 1/2" but the tees i have are 1x1x1 i can not find 1x 1/2x 1?? why?

    so i guess i will be coming out of the tee with a 6" nipple then down to 3/4" then finally 1/2" what a pita.

    so before i go and make more work for myself then i really need to, is there a union that goes from 1" to 1/2" and why can't i find a tee that goes from 1 1/4" x 1/2" x1 1/4 but not in the 1" size?

    also i plan on using teflon tape on the threads or should i use pipe dope?

    thanks in advance for any and all help given.
    Last edited by oldslowchevy; 09-10-2011, 07:51 AM. Reason: i needs to learns how 2 spells
    9/11/01, never forget.

  • #2
    Re: union question

    Use a 1" -1/2" galv. bushing.

    As for pipe dope, I like good old Rector Seal for galvanized.
    Last edited by James P; 09-10-2011, 08:32 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: union question

      if you're calling around, then the problem is the way you're calling the fitting.

      the tee branch is the 3rd number.

      so while a 1 x 1/2 x 1 is kind of oddball for most diy places. the tee you need is a 1 x 1 x 1/2''. also known as a 1 x 1/2.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: union question

        ahhhhhhhh thank you guys, this is just one of the 397,816 reasons that i am not a plumber!

        as the wife says...... i may not be real smart, but i can lift heavy things!

        i am just glad utah didn't lock this thread up
        9/11/01, never forget.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: union question

          Originally posted by oldslowchevy View Post
          ahhhhhhhh thank you guys, this is just one of the 397,816 reasons that i am not a plumber!

          as the wife says...... i may not be real smart, but i can lift heavy things!

          i am just glad utah didn't lock this thread up

          thats why this forum is here with good people to help each other out
          Charlie

          My seek the peek fundraiser page
          http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


          http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

          new work pictures 12/09
          http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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          • #6
            Re: union question

            OSC,

            Not sure what the current "code" is and perhaps there really isn't one... but, as I recall 'galvanized' pipe is not generally recommended for air-lines... at least not in the commercial compressor world (more than 30 years doing instruction manuals for Ingersoll-Rand (Air Compressor Division) and Dresser-Rand (Gas Process Division). Problem is possibility of "flaking" and having such debris downstream and into the tooling.

            Of course, I've been out of that end of the business since 2000, so don't know if the thinking has changed.

            I hope this helps,

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: union question

              Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
              OSC,

              Not sure what the current "code" is and perhaps there really isn't one... but, as I recall 'galvanized' pipe is not generally recommended for air-lines... at least not in the commercial compressor world (more than 30 years doing instruction manuals for Ingersoll-Rand (Air Compressor Division) and Dresser-Rand (Gas Process Division). Problem is possibility of "flaking" and having such debris downstream and into the tooling.

              Of course, I've been out of that end of the business since 2000, so don't know if the thinking has changed.

              I hope this helps,

              CWS
              I agree and thought copper was the way to go.


              http://ezinearticles.com/?What-Is-Th...hop?&id=401784
              Last edited by Frankiarmz; 09-13-2011, 12:51 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: union question

                i never really thought of the flakes, is there some kind of filter i can put in just in case? i have over 600' installed and i have 18 drops that i am planing on installing, i really would hate to have to take all of this down and start again. i have already plumed my 3 lifts with a drop on each post, and the paint room has 4 drops 1 on each side and 1 in the front and one in the rear. and the i 2 over the work benches one on each end of the building and 1 just out side the door.
                9/11/01, never forget.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: union question

                  I have always used black pipe for air
                  Your not going to be the only with galv air lines
                  Put a dirt leg under each drop

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: union question

                    a "dirt leg"?
                    9/11/01, never forget.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: union question

                      i would be much more concerned about black pipe and rusting due to moisture in the line.

                      in the miles and miles of pipe i've installed in galvanized for both air and natural gas, i'm still waiting to spot my first piece of gal flakes.

                      must be a california thing. being closer to china, we must get the good stuff they send us

                      nothing wrong with gal pipe.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: union question

                        I worked in a 225,000 sq. ft. facility with miles of galvanized air lines. In 24 years never had a problem.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: union question

                          Originally posted by oldslowchevy View Post
                          a "dirt leg"?
                          Same as you would for gas piping.

                          Of the three I think Copper is best choice then black pipe then Galv.
                          Being you already have the Galv pipe installed doesn't really matter, you
                          just have to allow for the potential problems it could create.

                          Regardless of the pipe material I would put filters in front of any equipment that
                          could be affected by debris in the line, and also moisture separators in front of
                          anything where moisture would be a problem such as air tools or spray equipment.

                          The closer these are to the end of the line the better. A filter at the outlet of your
                          compressor is good but does nothing to protect you from moisture, rust or scale
                          that may get picked up in the pipe along the away to your tool. Also, the air will
                          be hot at the compressor outlet and the moisture will not be as easily separated
                          at elevated temperatures, and could condense out as it travels through your 600
                          feet of pipe (which it will surely do in the longer pipe runs).
                          "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                          John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                          • #14
                            Re: union question

                            Originally posted by James P View Post
                            I worked in a 225,000 sq. ft. facility with miles of galvanized air lines. In 24 years never had a problem.
                            I've worked in places with many miles of black pipe used for both instrument air and service air (tools, etc) and they were nothing but trouble. Its mostly (25% of the problem) about how well you process that air when it leaves the compressor(s) AND how careful you are during installation of the piping (75% of the problem) that will make the difference in air quality down the road.
                            "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                            John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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                            • #15
                              Re: union question

                              Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                              i would be much more concerned about black pipe and rusting due to moisture in the line.

                              in the miles and miles of pipe i've installed in galvanized for both air and natural gas, i'm still waiting to spot my first piece of gal flakes.

                              must be a california thing. being closer to china, we must get the good stuff they send us

                              nothing wrong with gal pipe.

                              rick.

                              Undersized lines running higher pressures to meet air demands can contribute to flaking of galv pipe.
                              Again 'clean' air will have less of an affect on the pipe interior. Air that carries along with it scale and
                              other debris will in effect blast the inside of the pipe and can easily remove the galvanized coating,
                              lead to reduced wall thickness and thereby cause leaks or pipe ruptures and even catastrophic failures.
                              "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                              John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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