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  • Truck Brakes

    I try to have my brakes looked at every 20,000-miles or so. I dropped my Ford E350 utility van off at the brake shop this morning to have them check my brakes. They called to say they didn't need replacing yet but it wouldn't be much longer until they needed replacing. I gave them the go ahead to turn rotors and drums plus replace the breaks. The job cost me $410 total using OEM parts. With 99,644 miles on the original brakes that's $00.004 cents per mile. I can live with that.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

  • #2
    Re: Truck Brakes

    My old E-350 dually stahl body was brutal with brakes and ball joints. I traded it in with 70,000 miles on the clock, and I don't beat my trucks.

    As much as I'm a Die-hard Fan..they tick me off sometimes with the cheap parts they put on.

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    • #3
      Re: Truck Brakes

      Originally posted by Flux View Post
      My old E-350 dually stahl body was brutal with brakes and ball joints. I traded it in with 70,000 miles on the clock, and I don't beat my trucks.

      As much as I'm a Die-hard Fan..they tick me off sometimes with the cheap parts they put on.
      Mine is an E350 single wheel with a stahl body.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Truck Brakes

        Mark, you got some great service from those brakes. Just a little information about brakes for the Forum. Most mechanics and shops in my area will not "cut" or resurface rotors or brake drums. While it is safe to do so within limits and has been done for years, they don't want to take the time and would rather just replace with new. Personally, I pull the wheels on my cars once a year hopefully before the rotors are scored and simply replace the pads. Drum brakes are actually safer on trucks because they have more surface area to contact between the brake shoes and inner drum.
        Just got rid of my wife's 1998 windstar van with 166k never replaced the rotors. My 1990 maxima with over 240k had the original rotors, I only replaced the pads regularly. Cheaper and safer to inspect and maintain brakes than run them to failure. I should add that driving styles matter, I'm willing to bet Mark does not jam the brake pedal like it's some kind of amusement ride and prolonged the life of his brakes. Frank

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        • #5
          Re: Truck Brakes

          Toutahnow what Im wondering is have you ever used your brakes?, my guess is Its ├* standard. Just From th├ę comments you strike me ├* an Old school kinda Guy ..either way .004 cents ├* mile is probally less then what i pay for car freshners .... Flux your probally pedal to the m├ętal till you slam on the brakes in search of whatevers rattling around in the back tick....tick....tick...clank. jjk guys funny the person you imagine when reading peoples threads.. thanks seanny

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          • #6
            Re: Truck Brakes

            I've always told both my kids and my employees, to brake with their gas pedal not their brakes. I just try to anticipate my stopping enough in advance that I'm easy on my vehicles. There was a time when I did all of my own mechanic work too and it really tells you which employee was hardest on their trucks. I had one guy who couldn't go 90-days with new drums before they were torn up. I would rather have an average plumber who respected his equipment that a super star who destroyed everything he touched. As for standard or automatic, I have not purchased a standard since my 87-Jeep Comanche Chief over 20-years ago. However, I did drive a standard exclusively in my early years.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Truck Brakes

              Originally posted by seanny deep View Post
              Flux your probally pedal to the m├ętal till you slam on the brakes in search of whatevers rattling around in the back tick....tick....tick...clank. jjk guys funny the person you imagine when reading peoples threads.. thanks seanny
              Seanny, I honestly believe the dullay wheel and the box on the back played a major part with the brakes on that truck. I'm not an auto mechanic though...so I'm only guessing, cause we really never had that problem before until that truck. We also found that nobody could truly align that truck right here...not even our local Ford dealer. We went through 3 set of tires on that truck as well for such low mileage. My New E-350 just feels so tight and all together different, but to be fair it's not dually wheeled either.

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              • #8
                Re: Truck Brakes

                Many years ago I bought a used brake lath, and had a shop that would bring me drums and rotors to turn, at first it was good, this was about 20 years ago, you could turn a drum or a rotor and keep it in specifications, then they either changed the specifications (molded into the casting), or they made the drums and rotors thinner to begin with but toward the end most were wore down to the limit or below and had never been turned, (the shop moved and bought there own machine) but I have not turned a rotor or drum now for 10 or so years, still have the machine, and put it out now and then for some type of project, but now days most drums and rotors are just replaced,

                and when they took the asbestos out of the lining material it got much harder on the drums and rotors, (it seems to me personally that what ever they have now seems to be a good mix for life and friction. as currently I have had good life out of the breaks and drums or rotors,

                we drive on a lot of dirt roads, and the dirt or gravel is very hard on breaks and many of the drums and rotors will have groves dug in to the surface some times up to 3/8" of an inch deep, and that will basically distroy a drum or a rotor and it will need to be replaced,

                my F350 dulley has been hard on tires and brakes, as well, some of it is the twin I beam, (having excellent shocks on the front helps, a lot), for front tire wear,
                on the twin I beam or the older ones at least the only alignment on the front is the toe in, and changing out springs, and replacing the I beams, (as the shop manual (FORD), states to not bend to align the steering replace only, I have the ford shop manual on my truck and my sons), and both say the same,

                (the dulley and the single axels are basically the same thing, except for track width, and brake widths, the dulley has a little wider brakes on it, as it has usually more GWV rating

                On the brakes I got about 80,000 miles out of the first set, (but I used it hard the first 80.000 miles pulling a 24 foot trailer and hauling up to 10,000 pounds on the bed, of it), and may have been able to get more but I replaced them any way,

                but the thickness or specifications have changed and usually will not take a re surfacing any more is my experience,
                Last edited by BHD; 11-08-2011, 10:31 AM.
                Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                attributed to Samuel Johnson
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Truck Brakes

                  Good post BHD. My buddy had some rotors cut and they ran into "walnuts". For the Forum, "walnuts" refers to a pocket of bad metal mix with the part. I've been told this happens when just any metals are thrown into the mix and not properly manufactured. The short of it is chinese junk, and our lives are riding on this stuff.
                  Last edited by Frankiarmz; 11-08-2011, 03:32 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Truck Brakes

                    Don't buy Chinese rotors! I repeat, Don't buy Chinese rotors!

                    I'd rather put up with my old warped rotors than buy Chinese.

                    My Toyota rotors run about $100.00 apiece. I changed pads @ 45K, rotors were too warped to turn. Next brake job, I'm biting the bullet for new ones.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Truck Brakes

                      Ford trucks and vans are tough on front brakes and I think it's because the rear proportioning valve doesn't put enough to the rear which can go over a hundred thousand miles and still look like new. I can do rotors and pads in my driveway, both sides in less than a half an hour, I've changed them so many times
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        Re: Truck Brakes

                        mark is it possible that you drive 300 miles each way to a job?

                        compared to my 13 mph average over the last 8500 miles and 653 hours behind the wheel at 12mpg

                        i guess sooner or later i will need new fred flinstone brake shoes

                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Truck Brakes

                          Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                          Ford trucks and vans are tough on front brakes and I think it's because the rear proportioning valve doesn't put enough to the rear which can go over a hundred thousand miles and still look like new. I can do rotors and pads in my driveway, both sides in less than a half an hour, I've changed them so many times
                          I'm not sure of the exact number but generally over sixty or seventy percent of the braking is up front. Changing disc brakes is almost a pleaure compared to doing drums. I would urge folks who do this to invest in a torque wrench and torque the wheel lugs to the proper specs, in some cases it can affect the "pedal" result. I have a friend who insists on changing his brake fluid every three or four years, says it breaks down? I had the same fluid in my 1990 maxima, never added a drop! A word of caution for beginners, try and take some adult education car care course, or spend some time learning how to do brakes the right way. Not rocket science but serious stuff. Some brake systems cannot be compressed at the caliper to fit new pads without damaging the antilock system. Some calipers cannot be compressed with a "C" clamp and must be turned in patiently, a special tool is available but not a necessity. Please, always use jack stands when working on a raised wheel.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Truck Brakes

                            Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                            . I have a friend who insists on changing his brake fluid every three or four years, says it breaks down? I had the same fluid in my 1990 maxima, never added a drop!
                            A number of years ago, we took my one ton truck and a trailer to a demo derby that my son was driving in, and ever thing was working fine and we got to with in 10 miles of the town and lost the brakes in the truck, we had driven a good distance and to turn around at that point was not overly practicable, so we used the trailer brakes and the emergency brake with the lever pulled and carefully crossed through town, and out to the fair grounds and got in and waited until traffic slow down some when leaving and made it back home,
                            from what I could figure it was the brake fluid and had got thick in the bottom of the master cylinder, in the process (took the master cylinder off and pulled it apart, (could not get a kit and no one had a rebuild on hand) so I cleaned it up and put back together put in fresh fluid and had not worked that good for many years,
                            became a firm believer in changing the brake fluid ever so often, (it adsorbs water out of the air) or the DOT 3 does, and the other do some
                            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                            attributed to Samuel Johnson
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Truck Brakes

                              My Ram is amazingly pretty easy on brakes. I do need to change out the fronts here soon, just did the rears last week. Cool thing with 00-02 Rams, you can upgrade the brakes to the larger rotors from the 03-current trucks with nothing more than a caliper bracket and the larger rotor. It's amazing how much better 13" rotors stop over 12"

                              Also, a lot of people make the mistake of just slapping in pads only. They don't buy the hardware kits. It's worth every penny to get the hardware kit. It replaces the pad guides, caliper guide pins (usually), dust boots and the silicone based guide pin grease. Many times I have pulled the calipers on vehicles to find the guide pins rusted up and don't slide very well. Many people just bang them over so they go over the new pads and then wonder why the pads don't last and wear funny...

                              Now, tires, that's a different story! I have yet to find a tire for this heavy beast that lasts longer than 35-40k. That's an expensive adventure every 18 months or so!
                              Last edited by Alphacowboy; 11-09-2011, 09:15 AM.

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