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Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

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  • Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

    Youqing (Chinese) cooks stinky foods which can smell up the whole house.

    From the basement I am hoping to run a flexible vacuum hose up the wall behind the built-in GElectric double oven.
    Wall is interior wall.
    The hose would come out athe back of the cabinet above the oven. The cabinet front is flush withe wall ovens.

    The hose would hang down with its opening just above the oven 2" wide 1/4" high vent athe oven door.

    The basement end of the hose would connecto some kind of vacuum.
    Its exhaust could terminate outside, or if not too bad, warm the basement by terminating inside.

    The hose could be completely pulled out for degreasing.

    Any ideas?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Robert Gift; 12-17-2011, 05:23 PM.
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

  • #2
    Re: Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

    ummm... a vent hood?
    This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

      Originally posted by Ace Sewer View Post
      ummm... a vent hood?
      Ace that would be to easy for the Mad Scientist. Robert what you need to do is get a industrial dust collection system, because the key factor with any good exhaust system is CFM's. You could put a big scoop like the one's used for chop saws & put it over the stove & you could put ports in every room & use it for a central vac also.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

        Originally posted by MR.FUDD View Post
        Ace that would be to easy for the Mad Scientist. Robert what you need to do is get a industrial dust collection system, because the key factor with any good exhaust system is CFM's. You could put a big scoop like the one's used for chop saws & put it over the stove & you could put ports in every room & use it for a central vac also.
        Too expensive!
        The built-in double oven is in an interior wall, so no exhaust hood is possible.
        Also, Youqing uses the cabinet above the oven. The cabinet front is flush withe oven.

        The hosend would hang just athe two-inch-wide oven vent, so likely all of the hot air venting would be drawn into the hose.
        I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
        It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
        "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

          I posted this last night, but don't see it now... I must have punched the wrong button or something:

          I see your predicament, being on an interior wall and wanting to suck away the cooking odors. But I see a couple of concerns with using the shop vac arrangement that you mentioned:

          First and foremost perhaps, is the buildup of grease and other possible flamables in the the corrogated hosing... that will be one heckuva challenge to clean out I think. AND, what about the flamability of that... is any sparking of the vac motor going to present a fire hazard? Certainly, I would not use the vac without a filter and I think I would still require some sort of conventional cooking hood and use it's metalic filtering to trap most of the grease, if at all possible (there goes any cost savings that you might be envisioning).

          Second - As previously mentioned, there's a concern for air flow (CFM) and I wouldn't be too surprised if the vac arrangement is simply not going to be enough. Along with that (and the 1st concern) is the possibility that grease and laden fumes could clog the vacs filter. I'm not sure if it is designed for this type contaminant; and, would such saturation provide possible combustion hazards.

          I don't have answers for either of these concerns and wonder if Ridgid "Customer Service" might well be the best place to pose such questions.

          Sorry that this isn't more helpful,

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Use a vacuum hose to pull oven odors out of the kitchen?

            Robert, I would think the hose would be nearly to small to do a worth wile job, unless you do add a "Vacuum" type fan/blower on it, and then you would not get to eat because Hose make to much noise, and wife stops cooking,

            I will suggest a range hood as well, if you wanted you could duct that down instead of up (most range hoods have grease filters, built in to the unit for keep the duct cleaner, they make rectangular duct work that will fit in a wall stud cavity,

            other wise, you might as well use a fume extractor, like welding shops use,

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            you may just want to build your wife a kitchen out back in the yard, that has all the gizmo's and do dads that shut things off and suck the odors out and so on that you have asked about, and that way you can design it all in so it is automatic, and you have peace of mind, (even put in a sprinkler system),
            Attached Files
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              PREVENT oven odors going into the kitchen using a vacuum hose?

              If hot water and dish soap cannot clean the hose well enough, I'll have to buy new hose as necessary. (Which is why I do not want to fasten the hose to anything.)
              To catch grease, I plan to buy a cheap shop vac athe thrift store or make a filter box from a corrugated paper box.
              But would grease condense on the corrugated hose before it reaches the vacuum?

              The GE oven vent outlet is in the clearance space where the door closes. It is only 2 inches wide by 1/4 inch high. CFM should not be a problem if the vacuum hose is placed righthere.
              I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
              It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
              "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: PREVENT oven odors going into the kitchen using a vacuum hose?

                Do you have a center island in the kitchen? Do you have a range top in addition of the wall oven? I would install a industrial type exhaust hood over the island or range top with a large cfm rating. If over the island, it would be a great place to use a wolk as well, and with enough cfms it should clear out any odors of the kitchen. Just make sure you have a large enough outside air make up vent or large cfm hoods are worthless.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: PREVENT oven odors going into the kitchen using a vacuum hose?

                  Just out of curiosity...
                  If you're moving that much air thru an oven, how are you going to retain enough heat in it to actually cook anything?
                  "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: PREVENT oven odors going into the kitchen using a vacuum hose?

                    Originally posted by Doctordeere View Post
                    ... If you're moving that much air thru an oven, how are you going to retain enough heat in it to actually cook anything?
                    Good point! The oven has its own fan, operated by temperature. It remains on well after the oven is turned off.
                    It vents through a small 2"x1/4" slot outlet just above the door.
                    The hose would not be connected directly to the vent. Just pull in air blown out plus room air next to it.
                    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: PREVENT oven odors going into the kitchen using a vacuum hose?

                      Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
                      Do you have a center island in the kitchen? Do you have a range top in addition of the wall oven? I would install a industrial type exhaust hood over the island or range top with a large cfm rating. If over the island, it would be a great place to use a wolk as well, and with enough cfms it should clear out any odors of the kitchen. Just make sure you have a large enough outside air make up vent or large cfm hoods are worthless.
                      Island has a sink only.
                      A four-burner gas stove top is left of the ovens with a SpaceSaver microwave above. It vents outhe FRONT! (Another project is to venthe microwave down the wall behind to the basement. Bedroom above, laundry room behind. (Youqing will not allow an exhaust channel in the laundry room.))

                      Smelly and messy foods she cooks in the finished back porch. It has a gas barbeque and "professional" exhaust hood. In the barbeque I.nstalled an electric two-burner glass cooktop which she wanted. It is on a 240 V plug which allows it to be removed to use the gas barbeque.
                      We have to open a window for make-up air.
                      Last edited by Robert Gift; 12-17-2011, 09:28 PM.
                      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                      Comment

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