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  • #31
    Re: Learning Bucket List

    Frankie, If you are really interested in learning t weld, head to miller's and Lincoln's web sites and take the tutorials. Then get you a used welder on Craigs List and have at it. Practice, practice and practice some more.
    sigpic

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    • #32
      Re: Learning Bucket List

      Frank ,You're a good Man, taking care of Your best friend ! That's what Marriage and friendship is about. I so wish You weren't so far away. We could spend some time at My shop on weekends welding. My experience in welding school is this. Our instructors
      came from years of welding experience. Excellent Welders, fair teachers. My Dad said "Son, You come from a long line of teachers". He taught school as well as 4 of His family. I have taught My Son carpentry,cabinetmaking, elec. some plumbing, welding .
      Teaching is in our blood. I,m envious of N.H. Master sharing His knowledge with the Kids. I grew up in New england, Boston area, and learned carpentry in the 60s there.
      Be well, Kevin the Carpenter
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Learning Bucket List

        Thanks Tool. I mentioned growing up in apartments, but when I got my first house my brother in-law Ken taught me how to sweat copper, frame, sheetrock and tape, and run romex, bx and outlets. I went from no skills to doing just about everything necessary on a house. those were great times, often exhausted, but young, in love and seeing the result of my growing skills. I worked on that house over four years and sold it for a nice profit. I've been on a rollercoaster with my health and my wife's health these last few years. Very hard to think of starting something when we are always going to doctors and unsure of the future.

        I don't have much practical need for the welding skills, but it's the kind of thing that is so useful when the opportunity presents itself. When the seat broke on my 1990 maxima, I had to drill a patch out of angle iron in order to support the broken area. What took me a couple hours could have been done in minutes by welding. I have seen small wire feed machines for sale new and the big Lincoln machines used. I need to save up some money and get some peace in my life before I dive in, but it is something on my bucket list. Something to look forward to that is attainable. Let me ask, is wire feed considered a cop out and not "real" welding as with a stick? Thanks, Frank.

        I was watching a few welding videos on Youtube and there is an awful lot to learn in addition to technique!!! This video seemed well done. Nice thing about Youtube is that I can download the videos and burn them to a DVD, then I can watch them on my portable DVD player.
        Last edited by Frankiarmz; 04-03-2012, 12:38 AM.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Learning Bucket List

          I basically learned to weld while still in grade school (8th grade), the farm did not have a welder, and I talked my mother in to buying a welder for me, it was a Wards power craft, 230 amp $99, for it time that was some money spent, then we had to wire it up, it was a 50 amp breaker 230 volt welder, (I so wanted to stay home from school and watch the electrician put in that wiring, we got it hooked up and I started to find and dug up any scrap iron I could and try to stick it together,

          we had on neighbor that gave me a few pointers, (since it was not a school) there was only one helmet so you could not watch the other work, but the welder came with a few pounds of welding rod, some 6013 and 6011, I would go down to the local farm store and buy rod by the pound, and come home with a few pounds of rod and weld up some thing, at first it looked like a chicken backed up to it, but later I got better, and build many a thing that should have killed me, like home made motor cycles using wheels from cars to farm machinery, even had one break in half going down the road,

          in school I took Ag classes, and did have some instruction but all ready knew how to weld reasonable by that time,

          but the big thing was practice, the school many times would go down to the machine/repair shop and get the off fall scraps and we would just spend time welding them together and many times taking the abrasive cut off saw and then saw across the weld to see if it was void free and a good weld,

          the school got a GE wire feed welder, (fairly new technology for it day), and the shop teacher said to me and another guy learn how to weld with it and then show us,

          I do not have a wire feed welder my self today, bought one for my son, and when he got his own shop he took it,

          my son basically just started to weld, (i show him some) but for the most part he learned on his own, and he got him self a job as a welder, later on, like said most is practice practice and more practice,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Learning Bucket List

            Originally posted by BHD View Post
            I basically learned to weld while still in grade school (8th grade), the farm did not have a welder, and I talked my mother in to buying a welder for me, it was a Wards power craft, 230 amp $99, for it time that was some money spent, then we had to wire it up, it was a 50 amp breaker 230 volt welder, (I so wanted to stay home from school and watch the electrician put in that wiring, we got it hooked up and I started to find and dug up any scrap iron I could and try to stick it together,

            we had on neighbor that gave me a few pointers, (since it was not a school) there was only one helmet so you could not watch the other work, but the welder came with a few pounds of welding rod, some 6013 and 6011, I would go down to the local farm store and buy rod by the pound, and come home with a few pounds of rod and weld up some thing, at first it looked like a chicken backed up to it, but later I got better, and build many a thing that should have killed me, like home made motor cycles using wheels from cars to farm machinery, even had one break in half going down the road,

            in school I took Ag classes, and did have some instruction but all ready knew how to weld reasonable by that time,

            but the big thing was practice, the school many times would go down to the machine/repair shop and get the off fall scraps and we would just spend time welding them together and many times taking the abrasive cut off saw and then saw across the weld to see if it was void free and a good weld,

            the school got a GE wire feed welder, (fairly new technology for it day), and the shop teacher said to me and another guy learn how to weld with it and then show us,

            I do not have a wire feed welder my self today, bought one for my son, and when he got his own shop he took it,

            my son basically just started to weld, (i show him some) but for the most part he learned on his own, and he got him self a job as a welder, later on, like said most is practice practice and more practice,
            Practice is key in getting good at any skill. I bought myself a 1"x30" belt sander with special grit belts so I could sharpen knives and such. I practiced on cheap knives and got the hang of it, now I can put a razor edge on lawnmover blades, axes, almost anything I can run across that belt. Not comparing this to the amount of time and skill needed to master welding, just agreeing that practice is very important.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Learning Bucket List

              Check out your local community colleges..some offer adult education courses
              Here in Phoenix Metro they offered two welding classes....beginner and advanced.

              You won't be able to work in the ship yards after these classes but you will
              learn how to operate safely, the science of welding, the types of welding,
              You also get to play with all the tools and "stuff". You will gain confidence with
              supervised instruction.

              I took these classes back around 1995 and I truly appreciated what I have learned.
              I'll never be able to weld a bridge..but I have repaired gates, made barbeque grills,
              made arts and crafts stuff for gifts etc.

              I use a Hobart MIG welder [120vac] I also have a Thermoline plasma cutter [120vac]
              My set up is 120vac as I was planning to go mobile but that never happened. I am limited to
              about a maximum 3/16" thick steel but typically I use materials 18ga through 12ga and usually flat steel about 1/8" thick

              My largest project was a 6x12 trailer with a dual axle. I was limited to what I could weld. I had a friend with a larger
              240vac Lincoln welder do the axles etc. I was able to do the guard rails, lights, and license plate holder. My welder just did not
              have the power to make the "serious" welds.

              Cactus Man

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Learning Bucket List

                C Man , A trick to Get by with a small machine. Add heat with Your rosebud [ Oxy Acetylene torch] Between passes !
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Learning Bucket List

                  FRANK, COME OVER TO THE BRIGHT SIDE !! Join Us Hobart Welders click on forum,scroll down to
                  metal art sculpture. My hero is Hot foot. Look at all his art.
                  Last edited by toolaholic; 04-03-2012, 12:57 PM.
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Learning Bucket List

                    one of the things I still trying to wrap my mind around is navigation, in general,

                    I look at the prairies and the land around me, and am trying to under stand with the tools they had how they so accurately lay ed out this country, (yes there are mistakes) but most are with in feet, yes you can lay goggle earth maps over and put the grid on, and see the errors they made, but the thing is most is right on, and in a lot of instances you can not hardly sight through for a straight line, (and even if you could see 10 miles), still you have to pick corners some time, (I have heard they measured with a rag tided to a wagon wheel) for distance,


                    I asked a few years ago, how does one go about getting a true east west reading via the sun? I think I figured out a way, and yes the north star, but try to lay out a line to build from using the north star,

                    I ordered a small sextant, for an attempt to figure it out some what, (and who figured out the nautical almanac), (yes it is probably fairly easy with computers), but some of this stuff amazes me,

                    because from what I read using the north star for finding a latitude is still hit or miss by about 55 miles, as it is not perfect centered and has a small rotation,
                    and I under stand longitude via time from GMT, but the accuracy of the time pieces, to locate the corner of my land, with in inches, or even feet, (I can see miles)

                    when the explorers and the pioneers come out here, it was a sea of grass, (some times there were land marks to work off of, but many times it endless oceans of grass,

                    and way I will stop talking but some time I want to understand the process, in a more complete way,
                    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                    attributed to Samuel Johnson
                    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Learning Bucket List

                      just wanted to finish the picture story on the tower, still need to build the turbine, but one thing at a time,

                      I thought the picture with he mast hanging and awaiting to be guided into the tower was interesting with the contrail, it almost looks like some thing was shot out of the mast pipe,
                      Attached Files
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment

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