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  • #16
    Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    Excellent point. I have an old 350 chevy engine He can convert to a pump ,If He's interested
    Makes me think of a "Junk-Yard Wars" episode that one of the teams tried to use an old engine block for that purpose, to pump water to feed a fire hose. Good in theory, bad in practicality. the team that build their own pump (based a lot like a standard water sump pump) killed the other team with the water delivery system but totally failed on the vehicle to get it there... man I wish I could have been on that show, would have been a ton of fun.

    anyway, the idea of using the vacuum to start the water flowing and then let gravity and the siphoning of water finish is the best idea I think.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

      Originally posted by reConx View Post
      Tool the chevy 350 as a pump reminds me of MacGyver and his inventive use of common everyday items to solve a problem for better or worse. We all experience a MacGyver moment
      Yeah but the REALLY fun moments are the MacGyver gone wrong moments.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

        Ridgid and Craftsman make a pump attachment for shop vacs (same pump just different colors). Probably not a long term solution though.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

          Originally posted by clmsntgr View Post
          My pool cover pump broke and there is stagnant water on the cover. I want to use Ridgid Shopvac to drain the water by hooking up a hose to the drain plug and submerging the vac hose in the water.

          Would this work?

          I just reread your question... and I think my previous explanation simply focused on answering your question about using a shop vac.

          The challenge of draining the water from the cover is just so much simpler than that. (I realize of course that everyone wants to use "power" to do everything though)

          It's been a few years (like maybe almost four decades) since my kid was little enough to have an inflateable pool, but "draining" it was often a necessity. A simple lawn/garden hose (or something bigger if you're pressed for time.) is really all you need, providing your have some place on your property that is lower than your pool cover. Simply connect the hose to your outside faucet, put the other end in your pool (or cover, in this case) and turn on the spigot. as soon as the water starts to flow from the other end, shut off the faucet, quickly removing the hose from the connection and holding your hand over the end to create a seal... then pull that feed-end to a spot lower than the pool and release it... "gravity" will do all the work.

          The water will then flow from the hose, creating a vacuum within the hose, which in turn will suck the water from the pool (or cover). This is just simple "gravity" and "suction" and as long as you keep the higher end of the hose emerged in the accumulation on the pool cover, it will continue to drain. The trick of course is to make sure you don't loose the fill that you put in the hose, before you start the process.

          I remember a home owner of a house I was once considering to purchase. He had actually piped up his sump drain to work in the same way... first opening up a water control valve to fill the drain pipe, then shutting it off, and opening up anothe valve or two to allow the draining water to then suck the pipe coming from the sump. That was long ago, so I can't just off my head tell you how that was done, but I do remember it. I have however used the "garden hose" on many occasions, as a method of draining.

          I hope this helps,

          CWS
          Last edited by CWSmith; 04-09-2012, 11:57 AM.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

            I love this idea !! I didn't know how to create a vacuum in the pipe to drain the water by siphoning. I didn't have a big enough mouth to suck all the air.

            Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
            I just reread your question... and I think my previous explanation simply focused on answering your question about using a shop vac.

            The challenge of draining the water from the cover is just so much simpler than that. (I realize of course that everyone wants to use "power" to do everything though)

            It's been a few years (like maybe almost four decades) since my kid was little enough to have an inflateable pool, but "draining" it was often a necessity. A simple lawn/garden hose (or something bigger if you're pressed for time.) is really all you need, providing your have some place on your property that is lower than your pool cover. Simply connect the hose to your outside faucet, put the other end in your pool (or cover, in this case) and turn on the spigot. as soon as the water starts to flow from the other end, shut off the faucet, quickly removing the hose from the connection and holding your hand over the end to create a seal... then pull that feed-end to a spot lower than the pool and release it... "gravity" will do all the work.

            The water will then flow from the hose, creating a vacuum within the hose, which in turn will suck the water from the pool (or cover). This is just simple "gravity" and "suction" and as long as you keep the higher end of the hose emerged in the accumulation on the pool cover, it will continue to drain. The trick of course is to make sure you don't loose the fill that you put in the hose, before you start the process.

            I remember a home owner of a house I was once considering to purchase. He had actually piped up his sump drain to work in the same way... first opening up a water control valve to fill the drain pipe, then shutting it off, and opening up anothe valve or two to allow the draining water to then suck the pipe coming from the sump. That was long ago, so I can't just off my head tell you how that was done, but I do remember it. I have however used the "garden hose" on many occasions, as a method of draining.

            I hope this helps,

            CWS

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

              The problem with a siphon is its slow. If that's not a problem then OK.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                IF you are in an area that gets a lot of rain you will be spending plenty of time draining water off that pool cover. I did it for years by siphon (nothing like a big mouth of dirty bird poop and dead bug water!).The best in my opinion is a pool cover pump with auto on feature, which turns on when water is detected, I'm not wasting my life draining water off the pool cover anymore, I'll drill a few holes to let the rain water seep in and let the overflow run out the skimmer.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                  I don't have a pool, so I guess I just figured this was an occasional challenge. I don't "siphon" by mouth... did that once when I was kid trying to get some gasoline out of one of the cars... got a mouthful that made me sick for the rest of the day.

                  For water drainage, I've always used the method described. It's fast enough for most things. My neighbor always drains his pool a couple of times a year just using a larger diameter hose. Takes a few hours though, but draining a pool is a lot more water than just the accumulation on the cover.

                  CWS

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                    All you need to do is put a few hoses in the water and hold the other end at the end of the shop vac (obviously take out the filter) Turn the vac on using your hand to cover the outside of both hoses...in about 3 seconds you have a siphon. Turn off the vacuum and get back to your life. In a few hours you will have an empty pool cover.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                      Good suggestion hm734,

                      Welcome to the Ridgid forum!



                      CWS

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                        Above ground pool covers are a funny thing to deal with because no matter how well you secure them the weight of accumulating water on top seems to displace the water in the pool. I suggest spending the money for a auto pool cover pump and not risk damaging the pool. Last season i firmly secured the pool cover hoping to prevent it from being drawn into the pool and the weight of the rain water was so great it was causing the pool to collapse inward. If you don't want to go for the auto cover pump, then you need to keep after draining the water off yourself. The suggestion by hm734 sure beats using your mouth, yuck!
                        Last edited by Frankiarmz; 05-21-2012, 10:18 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                          I suppose that much depends on the size of the pool, but I wonder if someone hasn't come up with a pole or brace system that would "tent" cover, so that rain water would just run off? It seems like such an easy solution; but alas that is one more financially challenging nicety that I don't have to worry about.

                          CWS

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Using Shop Vac as a pump

                            I have considered such a solution by either building a frame work covered by a larger tarp, or running a cable between two high points above the pool and using that as a center support. I would need a very large tarp to provide the needed coverage and there is the problem of snow and ice accumulation. I'm sure it can be done, but you would still need an inner pool cover to keep out blowing leaves, other debris and small critters. My 24ft round pool only requires a single 4x8foot inflatable "pillow" to allow for surface freezing, but years ago I tied several together to form a pyramid. Even though the cover had a good peak to it, the smallest puddle on top would eventually either displace most of the pool water or collapse it altogether if left undrained. You really have to see it to believe it. I thought for sure the rain water would just puddle on top and be done with it, but that's not how it works.

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