Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Clear coating oil based enamel.

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Clear coating oil based enamel.

    I did a cheap paint job on my 30 year old F250 with Rustoleum Professional oil based enamel. Looks a lot better than the rust spots they were there before! I know a laquer won't work as a top coat but wondered what would work as a clear top coat that will offer better protection and can be polished?

  • #2
    Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.

    Maybe???........this.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.

      I would think one should be able to just wax what is there with out problem, the professional oil base should be as good a equipment enamel used for machinery,
      and many farmers have waxed there combines and tractors in the off season, and some of the old enamels paints (besides being lead based) most likely were not a much better paint,

      I have a 1980 ford pickup that is painted with Sherwin Williams enamel. no I have not tried to polish it, but it has been there a few years now, but if I wanted to I know I could wax it and polish it,

      below is a before and after pictures of it,
      Attached Files
      Last edited by BHD; 04-13-2012, 10:27 AM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.

        Originally posted by BHD View Post
        I would think one should be able to just wax what is there with out problem, the professional oil base should be as good a equipment enamel used for machinery,
        and many farmers have waxed there combines and tractors in the off season, and some of the old enamels paints (besides being lead based) most likely were not a much better paint,

        I have a 1980 ford pickup that is painted with Sherwin Williams enamel. no I have not tried to polish it, but it has been there a few years now, but if I wanted to I know I could wax it and polish it,

        below is a before and after pictures of it,
        'Im going with wax, but not for a few months to let it harden fully . I did a bit of reading and apparently theres no need for a top clear coat on an oil based enamel. Nice truck BTW

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.

          I'm certainly no expert on automotive finishes, but being sort of around for a few decades I wanted to comment that "clear coat'' is sort of a "new" thing. Old automotive enamels and I think before that, "Lacquers" never got a "clear coat"... at least not in any experience that I've had.

          My Dad was a guy who on occasion had to repaint one of the old cars (the 47 Plymouth and the 49 Mercury that we had at different times). IIRC, they were both enamel; but I was sort of a little guy at the time, though still something of a "helper".

          My 68' Plymouth, 76' Mercury, 84' Toyota, and 91' Plymouth all had automotive enamel finishes as far as I know. My 95' Miata was the first "clear-coated" vehicle that I've owned, to my knowledge.

          Point is that there's nothing wrong with just an "enamel" finish (that I know of). As long as it has "aged" a bit (hardened properly), a good coat of wax should be all that is necessary. I recall a couple of my cars (the 65' VW, 68' Plymouth, and 76' Mercury all had a mention in the owner's manual about waiting for a few weeks or months before you "polished".

          I hope this helps,

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.


            It has been my understanding and belief that the birth of a Clear Coat came about because of the EPA cracking down on some of the ingredients as being harmful and as a result, paint finishes suffered. Not nearly as durable and more susceptible to fading (just compare the finishes of the 40's, 50's, and 60's to the 70's and 80's). Then a clear coat was developed to help harden (and protect) the finish as well offer some protection of UV fading.

            If you can find some paint from that era would be a great find. It's hard, if not impossible, to find a paint that is worth anything in today's world because of EPA's, most time, overkill of the dangers.

            Just my 2ยข

            Ron


            Last edited by lreops; 04-13-2012, 05:42 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Clear coating oil based enamel.

              Ron,

              Thanks for the post. I think you may have something there. My 76' Mercury was about the worst paint job of any car that I've ever owned. "Orange Peel" seemed to be what they were striving for on that exceptionally poor quality beast. I bought it brand new in late May of that year, was at the dealer's when it came in on the truck... it met all the criteria that I wanted and told the salesman, "I'll take that one, as soon as you unload it!". I picked it up a couple of days later after it was prepped. What a mistake that was!!!!

              The paint just fell off that car, literally! By August I had it back in the shop for a repaint of the cowling (a roughly 4 x 10 piece of paint had blown off in the night and I found it in the yard next to the car). By the beginning of September I had rust through where the door mirror mounted and the trunk was showing "fallout", with discolored spots. The dealer told me it was the new paint and the EPA regulations. Of course I didn't believe him at the time.

              I used to be an "inspector" in an assembly plant long ago, and within a few days of picking up this car I found over 80 defects in assembly, fitting, missing parts, etc. So the "paint job" was only a small part of the story. In any case, by the time the car was seven years old it wasn't roadworthy anymore. Not enough steel in it to mount the shocks, fender liners had rusted through into the trunk, gasoline tank had rusted thru within three years, radiator collapsed at two years, etc., etc. etc. To say the least, that's the last "Ford" product I ever looked at.

              CWS

              Comment

              Working...
              X