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  • Question about snowblower rims and tires

    I have a 1977 vintage Yard Man snowblower that needs its tires replaced. While I am at it, I'd like to also get the rims in better shape.

    The rims are rusted about 50%, so I'm wondering how hard it is to get the rims cleaned up versus buying new ones. For cleaning them up, I was considering sanding and wire brushing off all the old paint and rust, and then giving them a couple coats of rust proof paint. How much effort is this, and is there an easier way to do this?

  • #2
    Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

    Joe, I'm glad you are forward thinking and preparing for the coming winter. Until you have the tires off the rims and you start removing the rust it will be hard to tell the true extent of damage and time required for cleaning. A proper paint remover or brake fluid will take off paint, a wire wheel will loosen some chipped paint and surface rust. Actually getting down to good metal may take quite a bit of effort and time. If you are going for looks and would rather not spend several hours and plenty of hard work on the old rims, why not price out some new ones? Since you are going for new tires, theres not much to lose by giving the old rims a few minutes of assessment. Unless you can get to good , clean, sound metal I would just get new rims. Good luck, Frank.

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    • #3
      Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

      Have them sand blasted. It will give you the best results. Those rims are small so I wouldnt think it would cost that much to have done.
      26+6=1

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      • #4
        Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

        A lot just depend no how bad they are, sand blasting would most likely be the fastest and easiest, but a wire brush on a grinder. would most likely work well, if it is flaky taking a small cold chisel and tapping the flaky rust will knock layers of it off,

        when doing tractor rims (in side the rims) that have had calcium chloride in them you run into a lot of flaky rust, I use the cold chisel or air chisel and grinder and cup brush, and will work the rims down to solid steel, if the inside of the rims are rough, and using inter tubes, warping the center of the rim with duct tape will salvage it, so the tube does not get damaged by the rim roughness, most of the exterior just a quick brushing and paint, normally
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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        • #5
          Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

          I'm thinking about the limited success I've had with wire brushes to remove paint and get to bare metal. I've tried cup brushes and wire wheels on drills, and maybe I'm doing it wrong, but it seemed to take a very long time and lots of effort to make even a little progress. I recall some paint getting "cooked" and smearing into the metal from the heat, and getting more like that as I worked the brush harder.

          If I try the chemical option, what kind of product will work on this kind of paint (old, hard, possibly baked on)? Should I try to brush/grind old paint off first?

          Eventually, I'd like to put a high quality spray paint on these. I don't care about looks, but want the rims to last another 20 years or so without leaking.

          Thanks for all the tips so far.

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          • #6
            Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

            I guess my thinking is if the wire brush can not get the paint off it does not need to come off,
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

              The last time I sent some rims to the tire shop I use they charged me $25.00 a rim ( tractor trailer size ) to sand blast, paint & install new valve stem. The rims were just like new when I got them back. If you want to remove the paint chemically I have found the more hazardous the stuff is the better it works. You might also find a sand blasting company that will sand blast them cheaper then buying the materails to clean them up yourself.

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              • #8
                Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                I ended up using a wire cup brush on my angle grinder, and a brass wheel on my drill. Took quite a bit of effort. Sprayed primer paint, and will follow up with a high quality paint after that.

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                • #9
                  Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                  Hi friends i am new here actually i just want to ask you a question and also need your advice that i have been purchased a new car and i want to change Rims and Tires in this car but i have no idea what is the best company of tires and rims which i need to select would you like to tell me out the name..??
                  Emcee Services Singapore

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                  • #10
                    Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                    Got the rims painted up and they look great. Ordered some snow tires and tubes online from Northern Tool (I wish we had a store near us) and now have a question: How the heck to I stretch the tire to fit the rim? I got them off prying with a piece of wood and a screwdriver. Can the tires be heated to make them more flexible?

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                    • #11
                      Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                      a set of tire spoons work, but you can pinch the tubes very easily,

                      I am guessing these are the Small er tires, and the small tires like lawn tractor tires are a pain,
                      I think norther sells the same thing, but harbor freight sells a little mini tire changer, ATV Tire Changer & Golf Cart Tire Changer and it actually works reasonable well, I clamp mine in a solid vice, it needs to be solid to use, and the little tire iron it has works good,





                      they also sell some low cost tire irons or spoons, Tire Iron - 24" General Purpose Tire Iron I do not own the spoons, (mine are ken tool) but I have done it with spoons, but I fine the little changer the best for small rims,
                      a person needs two spoons and some times three, screw drivers are sharp and can cut and I think slip and do not work a well, not the best video but does show how to do it,


                      kind of intresting guy, but he does know a lot about tires, if you want to skip in to about 8 mins is were he starts to mount the tire, using the locking plyers is a good tip, having a tire tool that you can fasten to the stem to keep it from loosing it in the rim is help full as well, you will hardly ever have a problem seating a bead with a tube,

                      for most I use a coats tire changer, and for the truck and tractor tires I use tire spoons

                      soap will work as a lubricant that does help, ( just use dawn dish soap and cut it a little with some water, still creamy in texture for putting on tires, ),

                      I try to avoid usnig tubes if at all possible, in any tire,
                      Last edited by BHD; 09-19-2012, 11:02 AM.
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                        I was able to get the tires on myself. To do this, I wrapped one side of the rim flange with packing tape to make the interface slippery, and then got half the tire on. Then the tube went in, put the stem through the hole, and inflated it very slightly to get most of the folds out of it. Then it was an effort involving kneeling, pushing, sweating, grunting (I'm still talking about the tires here! ), beer, and using wood scraps to press the tire over the rim. Then I removed the tape and inflated the tube. They look great.

                        Even though I was ready to give up if it ended up taking more than 15 minutes per tire, next time I will heed the advice here and bring it to a shop.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Question about snowblower rims and tires

                          For Sale, snow shovel, call Joe @..................
                          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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