Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The President's Priorities

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: The President's Priorities

    There's only one more bleeding heart, in denial, living in oblivion liberal to weigh in on my accurate observations and predictions.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: The President's Priorities

      Frankie,

      Man, I wish you could see. I'm surprised you even get out of bed in the morning and not just pull the blankets over your head, much less drag yourself to the keyboard to complain. Sorry, I don't mean to be disrespectful but really these little comments are I think, beneath your abilities.

      CWS

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: The President's Priorities

        CWS, try to lighten up. Humor in all this dysfunction is one of the reasons I keep moving forward. I can take being compared to chicken little and the sky is falling reference. I would hope those who think everything is just dandy can find some humor in the reports that contradict their assumptions. I do find no humor in rising gasoline prices, to the contrary I find that reality very upsetting and it is beneath any caring person to suggest otherwise. Just my opinions.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: The President's Priorities

          Frank,

          Please understand, I only check into this forum for it's entertainment value... it gives me something to chuckle about everyday.

          While I too complain (the forum doesn't like the word "b!tch" about the gasoline prices, it's probably no more or less than I complain about the weather. Short of the government taking over the industry (and we all know what a mess that would be) or setting up something like they did with the TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) back in the 30's, I don't know what more can be done. As we all know, big oil is making ever increasing profits and though the price does go down occasionally, it never seems to go back to where it was before whatever "reason" they had for that particular excuse to raise the price, when it goes away. Just look at the price of Diesel... Fifiteen or so years ago, and before, it was the "cheap fuel". It shot "through the roof" more than a decade ago, when a refinery was destroyed by fire somewhere in the "Pacific Rim" (can't remember if it was in Indonesia or where). I'm sure that refinery has been replaced and probably there's more of this fuel than ever before, but the price is still siginificantly higher than gasoline.

          About the only way we're going to see a significant drop in gasoline is if you come up with some technology to run our cars on an alternatively cheaper fuel, in which case I'd be very, very happy. In the mean time (as always), I plan my trips, pick the best vehicle, keep it well maintained, and buy at the cheapest gas stations. And, during my working years I selected my home in close proximity to work, so I didn't have to drive. We all make choices.

          But, here's a really "crazy" suggestion: With today's technology, most if not all, gas stations control their pumps (and the price) electronically. There are even some devices that you can put on your car that will automatically trigger the pump to charge your credit card (when my son lived in either the Washington or Chicago area [I can't remember which] he simply stuck it in his side window) for your purchase.

          So, here's my idea: We base the fuel price, up or down, based on the vehicle you drive. Let's say weight or whatever, let the state government regulate that like they do registration and licensing fees. So, if you drive an economy car you get a discount on your per-gallon purchase. If you drive an average (whatever that may be) vehicle, you pay the pump price; and if you drive some guzzler, then you actually pay a premium price. For example, if the price is normally $3.50 a gallon, you drive "average" you pay the $3.50, and if you drive above that, you pay $3.75, etc. And, for all those guys out there who work for a living, and their truck is a part of that work... well, they get "discounted" in some way too. Basically, I think fuel cost needs to be reflected in a driver's sense of economy.

          So, while you and I may complain about the gas prices, it doesn't seem to make a lot of historical sense to me that our vehicles are getting bigger and bigger and no realistic increase in fuel economy goes with that. Hey, my old 56' Merc with it's V8 and four-barrel got 21 mpg. My 65 VW got 36 mpg and my 85 Toyota got 46 mpg. From a strickly fuel mileage point of view, we don't seem to be making any progress! YET, our vehicles just get bigger and bigger and more luxurious.

          My Dad spent all of his life in the trades. His vehicle was a little Ford pickup... For the steel that's in today's pickups you could probably make at least three of old ones. And, while Dad could carry just about everything he needed, and "the bed" was most always crammed, I see one helluva lot of pickups on the road today that don't seem to have ever carried even a bag of potatoes. And how many Hummers do we all see out there. Hey, I drive a Dodge Caravan and can get a full sheet of ply back there with the lid down. I get 28 mpg out on the highway. In a Hummer, you can't put anything close to that... so I reason that if you drive something like that, you really should be paying a lot more for your gallon than I have to. And for those economical folks who drive something small, well, they should be benefitted in thier per-gallon price too.

          I think if we did that, we'd see some serious changes in what we buy. We'd see less damage to the roads, more parking space, less pollution, and a drop in fuel demand (not to mention steel, etc.) and the price would go down somewhat. Plus, smaller vehicles are more condusive to alternate energy and even drive-train possiblities.

          Crazy idea perhaps,

          CWS

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: The President's Priorities

            Yeah CWS, that's a crazy idea and I would suggest just the opposite. There are a lot of folks who are driving gas guzzlers because that's what they could afford as a used vehicle. I don't expect someone on a fixed income, someone barely getting by or looking for work to purchase a more economical car. The idea of more economical cars, less polution and damage to the roads is fine, if we had a good economy, unfortunately we don't. We have two old ford explorers in our family, bought them used because that's what we could afford. They get about 12 mpg. The alternative would be tens of thousands of dollars we don't have for new or newer 4cyl 20 plus mpg vehicles.
            You want folks to switch to more economical vehicles? Offer a twenty thousand gov't rebate, cash for clunkers won't help. We have altenative fuel, natural gas and propane. The conversion cost it too high and the infrastructure can't support the demand if conversion was affordable.
            Last edited by Frankiarmz; 02-01-2013, 05:19 PM.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: The President's Priorities

              Ah Ha... now I know why you do so much complaining about gas prices. Well, I have no idea whatsoever why YOU would want to drive something like a Ford explorer. You spend a lot of time going off-road, or maybe your streets are just mud when it rains or something? Listen, we've gone through gas problems in the 70's, 80's, 90's, and now in the new century.... and you say you drive a couple of old Ford Explorers that get 12 mpg????? WHAT WERE YOU THINKING?

              And don't go telling me you bought "them used because that's what you could afford". Hey, weren't you the guy who was telling us a few months ago that you retired when you were 53 and that you've got great benefits and that only up until this year you've had free health insurance?

              I only buy what I can afford too. I haven't had a NEW car since my 1984 Toyota Tercel wagon. My 91' Plymoth van was purchased for $5K in 1997, looked like the dickens with all the paint falling off, but it afforded me good room and I drove it right up through 2010 when it finally crapped-out on my. I then bought my present 2006 Dodge Caravan ($12K), for the same reason... I need the room and comfort for almost weekly trips back and forth from Painted Post to Binghamton. It gives me plenty of room and comfort and I get pretty decent mileage for a 2-ton vehicle with linear ft of enclosed cargo space. BTW, my income is less right about at the poverty margin AND I pay for more than half of my health insurance.

              But, I agree with the fact that we all can't afford to buy new vehicles. But, we do all have choices and priorities that we need to make when it comes to transportation; and at 12 mpg, I think I'd be seriously looking to make some financial decisions about that, or else seriously consider why I need two of those guzzlers.



              CWS

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: The President's Priorities

                Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                Yeah CWS, that's a crazy idea and I would suggest just the opposite. There are a lot of folks who are driving gas guzzlers because that's what they could afford as a used vehicle. I don't expect someone on a fixed income, someone barely getting by or looking for work to purchase a more economical car. The idea of more economical cars, less polution and damage to the roads is fine, if we had a good economy, unfortunately we don't. We have two old ford explorers in our family, bought them used because that's what we could afford. They get about 12 mpg. The alternative would be tens of thousands of dollars we don't have for new or newer 4cyl 20 plus mpg vehicles.
                You want folks to switch to more economical vehicles? Offer a twenty thousand gov't rebate, cash for clunkers won't help. We have altenative fuel, natural gas and propane. The conversion cost it too high and the infrastructure can't support the demand if conversion was affordable.
                you need a 20k rebate to get you into a newer car? Who is the begger now looking for handouts. Next thing you know you'll be complaining because you don't get a gas allowance card from uncle sam. You can easily get 20 mpg from even a 8 year old vehicle, and for way less than 20k. I have an 05 f-150 that gets 17 mpg year round. It owes me nothing having never had a mechanical problem in pver 106k miles. It still looks in near new condition.

                There are plenty of mid size cars that get over 20 mpg, both new and used. You make a poor case for your position in this post Frank.
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: The President's Priorities

                  I retired when I was 48! Paid one daughter's way through 4 yrs at Cornell, doing the same for the other daughter right now. Eight year old car Bob? That would be real nice, mine are 1999 and 1997, and had to put over a grand into both once we got them. CWS, I was thinking we needed two cars, each had to be under 4k. Most vehicles that fit that description are already junked I'm not looking for hand out and I sure don't need gov't help, but speaking for the millions of folks driving similar rides and with worse finances ,yes they need $2 a gallon gas or lower. I myself would need a full rebate in order to get into a new car, but I'm in no rush.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: The President's Priorities

                    Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
                    I retired when I was 48! Paid one daughter's way through 4 yrs at Cornell, doing the same for the other daughter right now. Eight year old car Bob? That would be real nice, mine are 1999 and 1997, and had to put over a grand into both once we got them. CWS, I was thinking we needed two cars, each had to be under 4k. Most vehicles that fit that description are already junked I'm not looking for hand out and I sure don't need gov't help, but speaking for the millions of folks driving similar rides and with worse finances ,yes they need $2 a gallon gas or lower. I myself would need a full rebate in order to get into a new car, but I'm in no rush.
                    maybe you shouldn't have retired at 48. maybe you should have stayed working so you could afford an 8 year old vehicle and more than beans for dinner.
                    you seem to have plenty of wine though.
                    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: The President's Priorities

                      Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                      maybe you shouldn't have retired at 48. maybe you should have stayed working so you could afford an 8 year old vehicle and more than beans for dinner.
                      you seem to have plenty of wine though.
                      Staying on the job was not an option. I had to take the early retirement, no choice there. Not eating beans for dinner but like many others cannot afford newer more economical vehicles. The price of gasoline alone is crippling our economy and worsening any chance of recovery. See beyond your own situation. What you see as "wine", I see as an accurate comment on the situation. My taxes are up, healthcare up, inflation is up and spending power down. You can choose to ignore those truths which impact many Americans, I choose to voice my opinions. If you don't like the wine, don't drink it.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: The President's Priorities

                        Frank,

                        I understand... Cornell certainly isn't cheap. Our son also graduated from Cornell and I'm very proud to say that he never had to take any loans, thanks to our saving for that eventuality. But between tuition and just living in "College Town" it was a somewhat shocking event. But still, we all have to align our priorities to ensure that we make it through such financial challenges.

                        I don't agree with your accessment that $2 per gallon is a "need". We have for way too long gorged ourself at the pump, feeding the frenzy of big oil profits, and even going off to war for the sake of more oil. The cheaper gas is, the more waste we as a society execute. Our vehicles are grossly too large, our driving wasteful and we think nothing of mass transportation and efficiency in our daily commutes. Even the very fact that many of us give little regard to long-distance commuting is illogical, considering the overall cost both personally and to the government for highways, right-of-ways, taffic control, safety, fuel, death, and all other related concerns. So to do most of us think nothing of spending our free time just using the largest vehicle affordable to flit from one shop to another during our recreational days.

                        And along with that is the "recreation" itself, with massive RV's, and off-road fun both summer and winter. We tear up the forests, deserts, mountains, hills, and valley's in our every increasing engine-driven quests for speed and hell raising. It's even become a challenge to take a hike, cross-country ski, or even find a nice camp or cottage where you don't have to put up with some character disturbing the peace and the environment with their revving engines. Maybe out in the west it might be different, but here it's almost ridiculouse to even try to get away from.

                        So, if gas is so unaffordable and such a luxury expense ("luxury", here meaning that the poor can't afford it), then why is ir so "cheap" that we think nothing whatsoever of wasting it as we do?

                        CWS

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: The President's Priorities

                          In ten years if not sooner, gasoline powered vehicles will be a thing of the past. That aside though, even if we opened up all the oil fields both offshore and onshore in this country and let the oil companies have at it, the price of oil and gas would not drop one single penny. The cost of drilling, developing, engineering, not to mention having to build a whole lot more refineries would guarantee that the price at the pump would not only not go down, it would increase. We need to move our focus away from regressive policies that hold tenaciously to a century old technology.
                          sigpic

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: The President's Priorities

                            Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                            Frank,

                            I understand... Cornell certainly isn't cheap. Our son also graduated from Cornell and I'm very proud to say that he never had to take any loans, thanks to our saving for that eventuality. But between tuition and just living in "College Town" it was a somewhat shocking event. But still, we all have to align our priorities to ensure that we make it through such financial challenges.

                            I don't agree with your accessment that $2 per gallon is a "need". We have for way too long gorged ourself at the pump, feeding the frenzy of big oil profits, and even going off to war for the sake of more oil. The cheaper gas is, the more waste we as a society execute. Our vehicles are grossly too large, our driving wasteful and we think nothing of mass transportation and efficiency in our daily commutes. Even the very fact that many of us give little regard to long-distance commuting is illogical, considering the overall cost both personally and to the government for highways, right-of-ways, taffic control, safety, fuel, death, and all other related concerns. So to do most of us think nothing of spending our free time just using the largest vehicle affordable to flit from one shop to another during our recreational days.

                            And along with that is the "recreation" itself, with massive RV's, and off-road fun both summer and winter. We tear up the forests, deserts, mountains, hills, and valley's in our every increasing engine-driven quests for speed and hell raising. It's even become a challenge to take a hike, cross-country ski, or even find a nice camp or cottage where you don't have to put up with some character disturbing the peace and the environment with their revving engines. Maybe out in the west it might be different, but here it's almost ridiculouse to even try to get away from.

                            So, if gas is so unaffordable and such a luxury expense ("luxury", here meaning that the poor can't afford it), then why is ir so "cheap" that we think nothing whatsoever of wasting it as we do?

                            CWS
                            NHM, I had not planned to retire at such an early age leaving myself with a financial deficit. I had not planned for the soccer mom speeding on a snow covered road, who totalled my car and left me with herniated discs and permanent injuries. That aside while some folks gorge and waste gasoline, others have no choice but to drive what they can afford and drive only when necessary.
                            I actually agree that there should be a plan, a national effort to move towards alternative fuels, but I am pretty sure the economy cannot support such efforts and the government has no plan. The necessary infrastructure to support electric cars, or other alternative fuels would be massive. If you haven't noticed our legislators are busy accomplishing nothing! The sale of A123 to communist china is another example of lost taxpayer wealth (250million) that will never return to our economy.
                            I say we need $2 a gallon gasoline in order to keep working people working, and spending beyond the pump to stimulate the economy. Same goes for folks looking for work. The move to the suburbs was predicated on affordable fuel and lower property taxes. We would trade off the convenience living close to our jobs and sacrifice hours of our lives on the road commuting for the American dream of owning a home. That has proven to be another idea not thought out to it's final conclusion.
                            If we had democrats and republicans working together towards a better future, gasoline prices could drop temporarily in order to stabilize the economy, while at the same time plans were put into place to transition to alternative fulel vehicles and the national system to support them. NHM, we agree on what should and must be done. We disagree that it can happen in this economy with this government.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: The President's Priorities

                              Frankie, It will never happen as long as there are lobbyists and corporations are considered people--regardless of what government we have. A friend of mine asked " if corporations are people, can I marry one?"

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: The President's Priorities

                                Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
                                Frankie, It will never happen as long as there are lobbyists and corporations are considered people--regardless of what government we have. A friend of mine asked " if corporations are people, can I marry one?"
                                Kid, I agree and that's unfortunate for us and future generations. Less pollution, better mileage and all the other savings and benefits are within reach. All it takes is leadership, and cooperation.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X