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  • Dimmable LED Lights

    I've swithced over to cfl bulbs wherever I could to save electricty, but they have their limits. One place in particular is my kitchen area where I have six recessed 65watt floods. I was going to purchase a retro kit from Costco (Rick already gave it the thumbs up), but then I saw that a LED bulb was available. I installed four out of the six and I am very pleased. The light even when dimmed is white, not yellow as my incandescent bulbs. Price is $8.99 per bulb. Costco now offers 90 and 100watt dimmable LED floods for outside use. IF they hold up, I think they are worth the investment.
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  • #2
    Re: Dimmable LED Lights

    The dependability of the lights is based upon how much they are cycled. The LEDs are rated for something between 50,000 and 100,000 hours but the electronics that drive them are rated for much less. More so if they are cycled frequently. The upside is that LED lights have come substantially down in price and there are much better color renditions and applications.
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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    • #3
      Re: Dimmable LED Lights

      Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
      The dependability of the lights is based upon how much they are cycled. The LEDs are rated for something between 50,000 and 100,000 hours but the electronics that drive them are rated for much less. More so if they are cycled frequently.
      Punky, I'll be the first to raise my hand to claim ignorance when it comes to almost anything electrical but how can something be rated for 50,000 - 100,000 hours when a component that is required to make them work in the first place isn't also rated for at least an equal amount of time? I don't doubt for one minute what you're saying it's just that is doesn't make any sense to me that something can be advertised as one thing when in reality it's something else.
      ================================================== ====
      All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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      • #4
        Re: Dimmable LED Lights

        Dave, the claims made by manufacturers are often based on conditions not seen in every day, real world use. Remember when they used to rate a cars horsepower? Back in the day that number was what the engine produced, not at the rear wheels. LED flashlight brightness is often rated for the what the emitter (LED) can produce, not what comes out of the front of the flashlight. Same thing goes for number of times certain batteries can be recharged, and all sorts of other things. We will just have to wait and see how long some of these products hold up under real life conditions. I remember buying rechargeable batteries that could be charged 1000 times. I figured if I charged them 50 times a year they would last 20 years! Unfortunately it doesn't work like that. You can't believe gas milegage rating for cars either

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        • #5
          Re: Dimmable LED Lights

          Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
          Punky, I'll be the first to raise my hand to claim ignorance when it comes to almost anything electrical but how can something be rated for 50,000 - 100,000 hours when a component that is required to make them work in the first place isn't also rated for at least an equal amount of time? I don't doubt for one minute what you're saying it's just that is doesn't make any sense to me that something can be advertised as one thing when in reality it's something else.
          Well I guess technically the LED light is the physical LED component itself. So, the claim that 'this LED light lasts 50,000 hours' is not untrue. I have an example of this. My $100 Cree 6-D Cell flashlight upgrade was rated for 50,000 hours. One of the little driver components failed after just 2 years of use... approximately 100 cycles. I took apart the LED assembly and removed the LED itself. The LED itself still worked even though the driver for the entire unit was dead.

          I'd bet that the light would last the rated amount of time if:

          - the power was completely smooth and had no frequency variations
          - there was no surge or dropout
          - the voltage was constant
          - the light was turned on and never turned off
          ~~

          ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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          • #6
            Re: Dimmable LED Lights

            Tire wear ratings are another example of what can be under near perfect conditions, proper inflation, alignment, rotation, etc.

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            • #7
              Re: Dimmable LED Lights

              Well, there are lots of "reasons", for whatever. I think in many of the descriptions of various lifespans, the terms are often "UP TO". Generally speaking these kinds of claims are not based on actual experiment, but on some kind of short-run, inspection analysis that is then calculated with a MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) sort of estimate.

              After all, let's face it... IF an LED bulb or group of LED bulbs had been tested to the lengths claimed, then 100,000 hours would mean that these final-result bulbs would have been at the end of their development over eleven and a half years ago.... and then just released for manufacturing approval TODAY, when the first of the group finally failed!

              (Hey Harry, ya know those bulbs those old guys were developing and turned on back in 2002.... well, one of them finally blew! )

              However, electronic circuits usually last quite some time, and generally much longer than 100,000 hours. The problem with electronics is that usually something just corrodes, or is damaged by some kind of shock. Good example, is my ICOM 751A short-wave transceiver. I bought it in 1991, and that beast is still running strong. The back-up battery was supposed to be replaced after ten years... it too is still doing it's job. I've got a GE transistor radio that goes back to the very early 60's... still works, but who listens to AM anymore! On the other hand, you could buy a similar product this afternoon and have it fail within a few hours; so there are always exceptions... but on the average electronics are far more reliable today than they ever were.

              Bottom line is that most electronic and those LED bulbs should provide really long-term service, but there is always an exception.


              CWS

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