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Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

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  • #16
    Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

    That Hilti/HD relationship must be a regional deal as I've never seen a Hilti product at my local HD.
    ================================================== ====
    ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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    • #17
      Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

      In my opinion Hilti is or at least was the gold standard of hammer drills and "bits"! Just as SnapOn was the gold standard for automotive tools. Guy s like myself learned early on it is better to buy once, spend more but purchase quality! Unfortunately our consumer goods in almost every area are no longer offering a gold standard choice. The term "professional grade" has been abused, it's misleading. You won't find educated consumers shopping for lawn equipment at home depot. Chainsaws, weedwackers, backpack blowers, etc, bulit to last can only be found where the professionals shop. Consumers with any sense must be willing to spend two or three times as much for the same item if they expect to have it last more than a few years. I don't think there is any going back to a time of well made, made to last products. Manufacturers will continue to cheaper their goods with plastic in place of metal, units not made to be serviced, replacement parts that fail faster than new, underpowdered motors, poor customer support.
      The sad thing is that we are not only wasting time, and money by having to repurchase this junk over and over again, we are also drowning in the garbage this practice creates. All the packaging, all the packing, and all the products filling our landfills, such a waste!

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      • #18
        Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
        In my opinion Hilti is or at least was the gold standard of hammer drills and "bits"! Just as SnapOn was the gold standard for automotive tools. Guy s like myself learned early on it is better to buy once, spend more but purchase quality! Unfortunately our consumer goods in almost every area are no longer offering a gold standard choice. The term "professional grade" has been abused, it's misleading. You won't find educated consumers shopping for lawn equipment at home depot. Chainsaws, weedwackers, backpack blowers, etc, bulit to last can only be found where the professionals shop. Consumers with any sense must be willing to spend two or three times as much for the same item if they expect to have it last more than a few years. I don't think there is any going back to a time of well made, made to last products. Manufacturers will continue to cheaper their goods with plastic in place of metal, units not made to be serviced, replacement parts that fail faster than new, underpowdered motors, poor customer support.
        The sad thing is that we are not only wasting time, and money by having to repurchase this junk over and over again, we are also drowning in the garbage this practice creates. All the packaging, all the packing, and all the products filling our landfills, such a waste!
        I agree with this. "Professional grade"... dont get me started...

        it takes effort now to FIND good anything! It's true, when you buy something. that you arent buying a product, you are really buying the service and backing of the product should it ever fail. too bad i dont have any local tool makers... i hate chinese bullsh!t
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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        • #19
          Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

          [QUOTE=CWSmith;411348]I think part of the problem is that the "Ridgid" brand is rather divided, with the plumbing stuff out of one division, the shop vacs out of another, and the hand-held power tools (carpentry) and stationary woodworking tools being completely separated because they are manufactured and warranted by Techtronics International (TTI). I believe that all too many of the customers are confused by those issues, thinking that all the "Ridgid" branded stuff comes from one source and are covered by the same policies. Nothing of course could be further from the truth!

          The Shop Vacs are made by a division of Emerson Electric which is of course the owner and parent company of Ridge Tool and the Ridgid name. The plumbing tools are made by the Ridge Tool Division of Emerson. It's warranty is different from the shop vacs, and certainly the reputation of the plumbing product line is famous for its integrity and quality workmanship and design. The Ridgid plumbing line is most likely the basis of all the fame attached to the "Ridgid" name and thus the attractiveness (customer draw) of that "Ridgid" label on any tool.

          But, it is only the "Ridgid" products that are made by TTI that carries the LLSA... which is NOT at all connected in either marketing, service, or reputation with the plumbing tools. When you call that 800-number for customer support (hand-held power tools and stationary power tools as used in the carpentry trades) you don't get the plumbing side of the Emerson's Ridgid industry; you get TTI's business. It is the same group of people that answers the phone for Ryobi and even much of the Sears tool support group. All so confusing, because only some of Sears' Craftsman tools are made by TTI, but none-the-less they appear to share the same parts and service support.... I really haven't figured that out yet.

          Even more confusing is that while Milwauked has been owned by TTI for a couple of years now, they seem to have a different service channel, and it seems to be much more reputable. Neither Milwaukee or Ryobi is covered under the LLSA that is offered for the "Ridgid" branded tools. Ryobi and Ridgid both share the same independent service centers, and they are independent of Emerson's Ridgid, although their assignment seems to be governed by Emerson's Ridgid.

          Marketing however does seem to be even more confusing. Ridgid's plumbing line is generally not represented in Home Depot stores and are more likely to be found with professional trades retailers. I noticed when the micro-cameras first came out they were in the local HD, but within a year or so they could only be found in retailers dealing directly with the trades... HD no longer had them or knew anything about them.

          ONLY the Ryobi and Ridgid brands of TTI-made tools are assigned "exclusive" to Home Depot. In those cases, it seems that HD dictates what it will and will not carry, and it is HD that seems to come up with so-called "combo-offerings". Many of which appear to be total flops and are often clearanced very quickly. Unfortunately for both product lines, it is HD that decides, on a regional basis, what it will and will not carry. That is why some HD's still have stationary tools and others do not. It is also totally up to the individual store managers what tools will be displayed... and in my local stores you can often find the old models of a particular tool still on display months and even a year or more after a particular new model has been introduced. It seems that some store managers are empowered NOT to introduce such tools until all the old models are sold and apparently there is nothing that Ridgid or Ryobi factory reps can do anything about. Personally I find this quite fraudulent and I've written HD's HQ complaints about it, but it still exists.

          On the same hand, some stores seem to clearance stuff and phenominal savings, while other rarely clearance anything. Same seems to be true with so-called "factory reconditioned".... in one of my local stores, that process seems to deal more with filthy junk ungloriously dumped for exchange by local contractors.

          The whole business model of HD has changed significantly in the last decade. Personally I find myself on rarely going there anymore. They have little to offer with their poor tool displays, mislabeled and poorly graded lumber stocks, constantly changing aisles, and untrained and unfocused orange aprons. It's no wonder they're the only store in the area that is almost total in their use of self-checkout robots. Lowes on the other hand has greatly increased its quality in both product and knowledgeable employees.

          how is it then that in the last two to five years home depot is crushing lowes in sales, profit and such, while lowes has closed stores?

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          • #20
            Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

            I buy, when I can, at a genuine tool store. Much better than the disposable junk at HD/Lowes.

            David

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            • #21
              Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

              Originally posted by pesciwasp View Post
              how is it then that in the last two to five years home depot is crushing lowes in sales, profit and such, while lowes has closed stores?
              Obviously, I don't dig into their overall profit pictures; and, I can only write of what I can see first hand in the local stores that I visit. In the Painted Post/Corning, NY area, Home Depot is the only store available, with the nearest Lowes being about 20 miles away. The Lowes is definitely doing a lot more business to the general public on almost any given day. The Home Depot however does cater to contractors a bit more I think. In Corning, HD is also the only appliance store available.

              Here in the Binghamton, NY area, we have two Lowes and one Home Depot. Again, Lowes is the winner with most people in the area. It's Vestal store parking lot is almost always more than twice the vehicle population of Home Depot, which is about five miles away, across the river. The other Lowes, which is north of the primary population area is also quite busy. Both Lowes stores maintain several cashiers during store hours. Home Depot is now reduced to one cashier, with six robotic self-check outs.... which on observation seem to be very rarely used except for very small (one hand full) quick purchases.

              I do think Home Depot has a much better tool offering, but the displays suck and there are no stationary tools in the Binghamton stores. The Corning-area HD still has some Ridgid stationary tools, but they are rough condition. There is no knowledgeable people in either store... at least not on my now-rare visits there. Still, the 'numbers' you cite are perhaps a reflection of better run HD stores in many other areas. Obviously I can't speak of those as they are not evidenced here. I am a fan of Ridgid and Ryobi tools and have made several purchases over the eight or so years. I have no tools from Lowes beyond a few Bessy clamps. But, as I said earlier, there is a definite drop off of my purchases from HD, and the two stores that I visit are far less populated by customers than they were just a few years ago.

              CWS

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              • #22
                Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                I agree that the shopping experience varies greatly from H/D to H/D. The Home Depot in my town is very different from the one just fifteen miles up the line. I still think my 5 piece Ridgid nicad kit was a great investment, tools going strong after years of service! My local H/D has improved it's stock of Ridgid tools, batteries and chargers.

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                • #23
                  Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                  Frank, they are getting better, but its a battle for shelf space. I've been grilling the Ridgid Power Tool Facebook page about it... amazingly, they are listening. They want to talk to me personally!

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                  • #24
                    Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                    Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
                    Frank, they are getting better, but its a battle for shelf space. I've been grilling the Ridgid Power Tool Facebook page about it... amazingly, they are listening. They want to talk to me personally!
                    Be careful, it might be a setup to wack you!

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                    • #25
                      Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                      We have no Lowes in Westchester County, only HD. I don't mind the self-checkout, and most people use them. We have 4 self-checkouts, plus they have one person open near the building materials entrance where they have the covered hood to load your car/truck. For the most part, they are quicker and bank-teller style lines are more efficient than the supermarket style lines. I would like to get a Lowes, only because there are some things like lighting where there are some differences in stock. For tools, Husky, Ryobi, and Ridgid seem to cover what I would need as a homeowner (or if I can wait 2 days, Amazon).

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                      • #26
                        Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                        HD gives me 5% off only if I ask for it.


                        Lowes gives me 7% off & I don't have to say anything.


                        Where I live HD & Lowes are located right next to each other & Tractor Supply is 1/2 mi. down the road.


                        It depends on what I need as to where I go, but Lowes has the best cashiers & sales people.


                        I don't want to know how to use it I just want to know where it is located.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                          Originally posted by BobsPlumbing View Post
                          Well, I don't know about this. If you only look at the tools that have been marketed towards the woodworker and homeowner, they don't have a humongous line to promote, do they?

                          Almost everything in the line is represented at my local HD. And I don't live in a large town by any stretch of the imagination. Only one HD. The battery tools are there. The corded tools are there. The vacuums are there. The generators are there. Miter Saws there. Table saw and planer there as well.

                          Now, they are spread out. So the generator is 3 or 4 aisles away from the cordless and corded tools. Then the vacuums are away from that I believe. The brand is not focused. Whether that is intentional or not I don't know. Or good or bad I don't know either.

                          The "professional" line of plumbing tools is not represented at all really. But I'm ok with that. I kind of want them represented at supply houses. Maybe gives me a knowledge edge for this or that tool to get a job done only I know about and where to get.

                          Just to give a comparison, Milwaukee has a ton of battery tools etc. that are not even remotely represented at my local HD and I don't think at many or any other HD's either.

                          Yes, hide those hand spinners from general population !!!

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                          • #28
                            Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                            I walked into a Home Depot over ten years ago. Took a look around and walked out. Never been back. Won't go back. Might as well shop at Walmart. Never been to a Lowes either and have no plans too in the future. Two companies responsible for crushing hardware stores and lumber yards putting countless numbers of folks out of business and out of work. Why would I support any of that? Oh yea, to save a couple bucks........maybe. Ridgid is just doing what big corporations do. Going where the dollars are a screw the long term effects, screw America and screw Americans.
                            sigpic

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                            • #29
                              Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                              NHM,

                              In many ways I would have to agree with you. But, both Lowes and HD, at least in my own experience have largely filled a void. Here's my example:

                              In the Painted Post/Corning, NY area we had four hardware/building supply stores before HD arrived. The smallest was Hall's Hardware, which was a small proprietorship that had been the center of Painted Post's hardware needs for most of the century. Tommy Watson (IBM's founder) worked there as a young man. But, the hard times of the 80's basically put them out of business and the owner found himself closing the store well before HD ever thought of coming to town. At the same time, a larger store just north of Corning went out of business too.

                              That left Riverside builders and the Corning Building Company, and in the early 90's, Riverside closed it's doors and soon thereafter suffered a devestating fire. The problem with all of these stores was limited supply or poor inventory and a very tight "return" policy. In the case of Riverside, their hardware was quite inferior grade materials.

                              In the Binghamton area, I'm not sure which came first... HD or Lowes. But I do know that most of the lumber companies went belly up. My favorite was Whipples', and they closed their doors in the mid 80's too. Places like Grossman's sold cheap (help yourself) goods and for only a short while were they successful... just poor service and a purchasing program focussed on buying the cheapest stock they could find... largely inferior grade materials. They and a handful of others suffered in the 70's and 80's economy and all but a couple failed.

                              As I experienced it, Home Depot didn't come to town until well after all of these failures. In Painted Post, HD didn't open unil early 2000 or so (IIRC). The Corning Building company still exists today, and still promotes a good buisiness in lumber, paint, appliances, etc. But, they were the only game in town left, thanks largely to Corning Inc's business tactics which largely has pushed appliance and funitures institutions out of town. "Corning" was largely influential in bring HD to town and locating it in the Painted Post area, as a further influence to remove any such business from the city of Corning.

                              In the Binghamton area, 74 miles to the east, HD purchased the old Grant's store in the Westover area and moved in there around the same period. Lowe's did have a store to the north of the city, and around 2003 or so opened a second store. But, we still have two or three other lumber retailers in the area and they are doing quite well, will better grade stock and delivery services, and custom orders. The appliance dealers in the area are still here and though I know that HD and Lowes offer considerable competition, there are many of us who maintain a loyalty and that "word-of-mouth" reputation goes a long way in bringing the customers to the traditional stores.

                              The thing that does bother me, especially with HD, is that they seem to target certain businesses... maybe it's just that they look to see what is florishing and then decide to get in on it. For example, in Painted Post we had lots of garden/lawn shops. Some quite large, but we had no rental businesses at all. So when HD came to town, what do you know... they have a very large garden shop, almost 1/3 of the store! No rental business though!

                              Out in Oneonta where my son lived at the time, they have four rental businesses and only a small garden shop market. So when HD moved there, they focused on having a tool rental center (neither Binghamton or Painted Post does that business); but they only had a small garden supply shop. While no doubt they have impacted the existing businesses, they don't seem to offer quality competition in either market and that is also true in the Painted Post area, as the existing garden supply stores are doing the largest share of the business still.

                              BUt, at least in Painted Post/Corning HD provides for a market that welcomed them. If you wanted to buy a power tool, plumbing or electrical supplies, appliances, carpeting, etc. there was really very little choice to be had; and in some cases, no choice at all.


                              CWS

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                              • #30
                                Re: Ridgid Marketing in the Orange Box Stores

                                Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                                I walked into a Home Depot over ten years ago. Took a look around and walked out. Never been back. Won't go back. Might as well shop at Walmart. Never been to a Lowes either and have no plans too in the future. Two companies responsible for crushing hardware stores and lumber yards putting countless numbers of folks out of business and out of work. Why would I support any of that? Oh yea, to save a couple bucks........maybe. Ridgid is just doing what big corporations do. Going where the dollars are a screw the long term effects, screw America and screw Americans.
                                It's not just to save a few dollars. I can go to any non-box store in my town. There are 3, including my plumbing wholesaler. Each of those 3 will never have the parts I need, when I need them. If I had no box store around I have to wait 3-5 days from my wholesaler, drive further to get the stuff or order online. As it is, the box store is literally pennies more than my wholesaler for the same products.

                                I have no problems shopping and supporting my local businesses, in fact, I prefer it. But when they don't have what you need, it's a problem.
                                ~~

                                ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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