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  • wd1245 shop vac

    for vacuuming dry wall dust. Do i need a bag or just a two stage filter.

  • #2
    Two stage filter is a good idea. But, clean it often. Drywall dust clogs any filter easily and is hard on motors. A bag will make dumping the vac easier.
    Mac<P>Problems are opportunities in disguise

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    • #3
      I have 3 Ridgid Wet/Dry Vacs that I use in my shop until I can addon and have room for a cyclone for dust colletion to my shop.
      I find the paper fins of the filter clog faster than I care to see and "pull" from the VAC lost. While at HD one day, I snagged up a package of 5 cheep paper bag filters made for some "Genie" application.
      They fit over the filters perfectly and was like 3 bucks for 5.
      I use to spend 10 minutes with the air line on each filter a couple times a week. But I rarely use the air line now. I simply use the bench brush when I dump the tub and it's good to go. I have not noticed any less "pull" from the VAC, because the filter fins don't clog anymore.
      For 3 bucks, it's worth a try.
      I'll get the Genie item # off the bag tomarrow and edit this post for those interested.
      John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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      • #4
        I agree that a bag would work the best. But where do I get one, or how do I modify my wd1245 to work with an off brand. Checked at HD and they know nothing about it. How could someone suggest to Ridgid to make a bag or adaptor.

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        • #5
          Hello, I am a design student from Auburn University. We are currently working with Emerson tool company (the makers of Ridgid wet/dry vacs) in redesigning the vac. I stumbled upon this forum to look for research on what users commonly find wrong with current models. So far the information I have received on this one topic has been invaluable. Thank you. I ask you to please list additional problems you have with user functions. Any additional ideas on improving existing wet/dry vacs would also be very welcomed. Either reply on this post or feel free to email me at - carsode@auburn.edu.

          [ 01-30-2003, 05:47 PM: Message edited by: design_student ]

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          • #6
            I would like to see the little plastic "elbow" inside the canister (where the hose plugs in) that can be used to attach filter bags (in addition to the normal pleated filter. The shop vac and I think some Craftsman models have them. They make sanding plaster (a common home repair task) much more tolerable.
            Mark

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            • #7
              For my "WD12450", I made a "Bag Adapter" using 2 pc. of 1-1/2" White PVC pipe, which allows me to use the Shop-Vac brand bags (10,12,14 gal size). You can use either the cheaper white bags (3 per pack) of the more expencive yellow drywall bags (2 per pack).

              The first piece is a 90Deg M x FM (street) Elbow, Genova # 72916.
              The second piece is a 45Deg FM x FM Elbow, Genova # 70615.

              The female end on the 90Deg Elbow fits the I.D. of the hose end (as it is attached to the side of the vac). Assemble the 45Deg elbow to it with the curve going the same direction with the end with the two protuding "nibs" being the outlet (these 2 nibs help retain the bag). With these two elbows this way, the bag will actually be installed backwards when compared to how it would be installed on a Shop-Vac brand vac (opening towards middle of vac instead of towards the outside).

              Because of the restriction these pieces of PVC add, this bag adapter set-up is not reccommended for anything other than Drywall & other fine-dust pick-up.

              I also highly recommend getting a Cleanstream filter element installed in place of the std. Ridgid element. Cleanstream doesn't actually make one for the "Ridgid" application, but the one for the Craftsman vacs fits acceptably.

              Doug

              [ 02-03-2003, 09:51 AM: Message edited by: dougmac ]

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              • #8
                Another way to reduce filter clogging with drywall dust is to get a Sand & Kleen Dustless Drywall Sanding System. This incorporates a bucket with water in it that is placed before your vacuum.

                A few years back I had bought one of the sanding heads that you attach to an 1-1/4" shop-vac hose. This works pretty good, but you still have the filter (or bag) clogging too fast.

                With my latest drywall project, a friend lent me his Sand & Kleen and boy does that work good. For one thing, it uses a small 3/4" dia. hose that is really lightweight & flexible (plus longer than the 1-1/4" hose I was using before).

                The Sand & Kleen is made by Magna Industries and I've seen it at Menards, but my friend thought he had got his from HomeDepot. They have both a 2-Gallon size bucket System for $20.00 (use with 1-1/4" size hose shop-vacs) or a 5-Gallon size bucket System for $40.00 (use with 1-1/4 or 2-1/2" size hose vacs).

                The majority of the vacuum's suction is diverted through adjustable openings in the hose adapter, so you are not putting too much load on the vacuum's motor. Suprisingly the small amount of suction actually going to the sanding head is enough to pull in all the dust !! The one I've borrowed is the smaller size, and I can see how the larger bucket would help by extending the time between water changes.

                Use this in conjunction with the Shop-Vac brand Drywall Dust Bags as I am doing and you will really extend the time between filter cleanings and reduce the exhaust dust particles.

                Doug

                [ 02-03-2003, 09:53 AM: Message edited by: dougmac ]

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