Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

another off topic (woodworking)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • another off topic (woodworking)

    not a woodworking question...but a home improvement question. more specifically drywall taping and finishing. can anyone here give me some tips on what i am doing wrong?

    i read an article in this old house magazine on this subject and followed their "how to" steps to the letter. problem is no matter what i do, the tape keeps what appears to be shrinking and the edge of the tape keeps popping up. i used all purpose joint compound for the initial coat and have been using topping compound it is feathered very nicely and everything seems to be smooth, only problem is the tape keeps pulling away. any tips would be greatly appreciated

    thanks in advance

    ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    Ed,
    If you are using paper tape, try soaking your tape in warm water prior to applying it to the joint compound bed. This will make it somewhat easier to work with and should help your shrinkage problem somewhat. One way to ensure that you don't get any shrinkage though is to use fiberglass tape. You should be able to find it in just about any hardware/big box store. The rolls are the same size as paper tape, but it is normally yellow in color and is a fine mesh.
    Bill

    Comment


    • #3
      I have tried the fiberglass tape in the past and have a harder time hiding it. i will try the water trick. thanks
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

      Comment


      • #4
        Sounds like you did not get the tape embedded into the the first coat good enough. It is a little late now, but in the future, put a good coat of joint compound down over the seam, lay the paper tape on top of it, and really force it in with a smaller taping knife (i.e. 6"). Let that dry overnight before adding the second coat.

        I like the fiberglass mesh tape except for corners where the paper tape is needed. Wipe the wall clean with a damp cloth and let it dry before using the mesh tape to make sure it sticks well. I you need to do corners, they make a paper tape attached to metal strips that works really well.

        I have found that it looks much easier than it is. It takes a few times to start getting good at it. Luckily I learned on a few friends houses!
        Mark

        Comment


        • #5
          mark...if i understand you correctly...mud the joint well, embed the tape well, and wait until that dries prior to overcoating the tape?
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

          Comment


          • #6
            "Well" is a somewhat relative term. Keep in mind that I am not a professional at this. I am somewhat proficient, but not very efficient.

            Put down may 1/8" of mud, lay the tape on top of it, and draw the knife down firmly. Remove any excess that squeezes out the side. What you will end up with is a thin coat of mud underneath the tape. This should be done with a 6" knife. Let it dry overnight. The next day, put another thin coat of mud on top of the tape again with the 6" knife. Let that dry overnight. From there, you can move on to coats with an 8" knife and then a 12" knife.

            Many "how to guides" say to do it in three steps 1 - Embed the tape and first coat with 6" knife. Let dry. 2 - Another coat with 8" knife. Let dry. 3 - Another coat with 12" knife. Let dry. When I first started, I though a few more steps with very thin coats may it easier to get a good looking wall with little sanding at the end. I do find now that I am getting better, I can get away with less coats.

            Two other things that helped me alot. Make sure that you hold the knife(s) at a low angle (maybe 15 deg) when smoothing out the mud. I also like to keep a big bucket of water nearby which I use to clean the mud off the knife often. Once the mud starts to thicken and dry, it is to hard to smooth out.

            In the future, I would suggest that you use the mesh tape (not for corners). I think it is easier to use.

            Hope that helps.
            Mark

            Comment


            • #7
              most definately helps mark. thanks
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

              Comment


              • #8
                A little more helpful advice. Make sure that you go up to a 12" knife so that the joints (especially non-tapered) are feathered out at least 6" to 8" on each side of the seam. You will find that sometimes the joint looks great until you paint it and then the "waves" show up. A good hallogen work light will help some of the waves show up even before you paint.

                When using the larger knifes to taper the joint out, keep the knife at a low angle and put more pressure on the edge away from the seam (kind of try to twist the knife). This will help build the mud up on the tape while feathering it out.
                Mark

                Comment

                Working...
                X