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  • Flattening a Plane Shoe

    Someone posted here somewhere, and i have read somewhere before on the proper proceedure for this. I have a notebook i keep notes to reference back to. I guess i forgot to write this one down. I remember the 1/4" glass with cork and spray adhesive, wet/dry sandpaper. If memory serves....600 grit? Well i tried this last night on a cheap-o plane to practice, using WD-40 as a lubricant and the paper glazed over, became useless in a matter of seconds.

    This leads me to believe i either have the wrong grit or the wrong lubricant?

    Any assistance as always is greatly appreciated

    thanks and Happy New Year

    Ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    Ed, use 60 or 80 grit Norton 3X paper stuck to glass with no lubricant, not sure what the cork is for but I don't use it. Even with 80 grit it will take some work to flatten the bottom of most planes. I follow with 180 then 320 to smooth out the 80 grit scratches, those 2 grits only take a few minutes each

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    • #3
      Heard a reccommendation of trying to contact a machines shop that does engine work. There is apparently a belt sander of extreme tolerances which is used to polish pistons cylinder heads etc. to =/- .001 of spec.
      I've also heard it said that the prodigious labor involved in doing it by hand is extremely rewarding and once done won't really have to be repeated.

      Might be worth a couple phone calls in my book!

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      • #4
        It is very rewarding, just finished fettling my whole fleet (6 old Stanleys). My 4 1/2 puts a nicer finish on cherry then my R2610. Ever wondered how they managed without sandpaper and ROS 100 years ago .... I don't anymore

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        • #5
          the cork is used on the bottom of the glass to keep it from slipping. works well

          Ed
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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          • #6
            Good idea, I have been wedging it on the bench but the cork sounds like a much better solution

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            • #7
              Cork works great. so do those slip proof pads you can find at the BOB as well as most dollar stores to hold your workpiece while sanding, etc
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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