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  • #16
    Some time ago i posted on the "plumbing" side about the difference between black pipe and galvinized pipe for a gas line. the reply surprised me. i was told that the only difference was the color.

    I thought this was BS and have never used anything but black pipe for any gas line i have ever ran!

    the curiosity comes in, as a DIY'r is what is the difference. i was told in the plumbers forum that black pipe is nothing more than galvinized with a black coating.

    this was the response i got.

    i was "taught" that if you dont use black pipe for gas that you run the risk of the pipe blowing!

    I take the common sense approach to these things. they make black pipe AND galvanized. if they were interchangable they would not make 2 different pipe!
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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    • #17
      BLACK PIPE IS PLAIN STEEL WITH NO PLATING/ GALVANIZING ON IT.THE PLATING IS JUST THAT. ZINC AND TIN PLATING.ONLY A FEW THOUSANDTHS THICK. JUST LIKE BUYING BOLTS. YOU CAN GET THEM IN PLAIN STEEL, CADNIMUN, AND HOT DIPPED GALVANIZED. IT'S STILL PLAIN BLACK STEEL UNDERNEATH.
      AS FAR AS THE MAJOR DIFFERENCE GOES IS THIS. GAS PIPE HAS TRADITIONALLY BEEN BLACK PIPE. WHILE GALVANIZED HAS BEEN WATER PIPE. FIRE SPRINKLERS ARE DONE TYPICALLY IN BLACK BECAUSE ONCE THE SYSTEM IR FILLED THE OXYGEN IS DEPLEATED FROM THE SYSTEM AND THE RUSTING, OXIDIZING EFFECT WILL BE ELIMINATED. SAME GOES FOR CLOSED LOOP HEATING AND COOLING. OUR CODES HERE IN LOS ANGELES, WHICH ARE ACCEPTED IN MOST PARTS OF THE US. ALLOW FOR EITHER GALVANIZED OR BLACK PIPE FOR NATURAL GAS. GAL BEING JUST A LITTLE BIT MORE MONEY. COPPER IS RARELY USED NOWDAYS FOR GAS. THE SULFER CONTENT IN GAS HAS TO BE LOW TO ALLOW FOR IT'S USE. WE ARE USING A LOT MORE "CSST". CORREGATED STAINLESS STEEL TUBING. VERY SIMILAR TO A GAS FLEX CONNECTOR. GOES IN VERY FAST AND FLEXIBLE. DRAWBACK IS THE COST OF MATERIALS. SAVINGS ON LABOR. ONLY SOLD TO CERTIFIED INSTALLERS. NOT DIY.
      HOPE THIS HAS CLEARED IT ALL UP. ONE LAST COMMENT IS SOME CODES DON'T ALLOW FOR GAL. PIPE BECAUSE DOWN THE ROAD A PERSON MIGHT THINK THEY ARE CONNECTING TO A WATER PIPE WHEN IT IS A GAS LINE. ON COMMERCIAL CLASS A JOB WE HAVE TO TAG AND ID ALL THE SYSTEMS.
      HOPE THIS HAS CLEARED UP THE CONFUSION TO ALL. PLUMBING CONTRACTOR SINCE 1981.

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      • #18
        Here in Illinois, at least in this part of my State copper pipe is no longer legal for natural gas. The gas makes it brittle and prone to cracking. It also becomes thinner with age as the methane some how eats away at the copper.

        Galvanized pipe is also negatively affected by the effects of natural gas but not nearly as much as copper. The galvinaized coating will flake and can clog an orfice at an appliance or piece of equipment (even with a drip leg). It is legal here but almost never used unless it is exposed to certain corrosive atmospheres. Galvinized cannot be used on welded systems ever. Stainless steel tubing and SS pipe are also used quite a bit more often than used to be the case. Some municipalities still have not accepted the corrugated stainless tube.

        One note of caution, if you use stainless steel pipe you need to be sure to get the pipe dies designed for stainless steel. Your regular dies will not stand up to the hardness of SS. It only takes five minutes to switch back and forth and its time well invested to protect your equipment.
        ------------------------------------------------

        I like some Sears hand tools, Milwaukee portable electric and cordless tools and RIGID Pipe cutting and machining equipment. RIGID makes some very nice drain equipment also but I avoid that type of work whenever possible anymore. Channel Lock and Crescent have a few really good hand tools for the trade as well. There is not a Chinese tool on my truck. Never will be.

        RIGIDs camera systems have saved a lot of headaches but we rent it when needed.
        Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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        • #19
          Who has better tools?

          1) sockets & rachets, screwdrivers, wrenches and other automotive type tools : Snap-On or Mac

          2) pliers : Klein, Channellock, Snap-On, Mac

          3) pipe tools : Ridgid ... period !

          4) adjustable wrenches : Crescent

          5) power tools : Milwaukee, DeWalt

          The list can just keep going, it depends on what kind of tools your looking for. If your interested in a vast assortment of quality tools ... search : A & I Supply, Tool Crib of the North, W.W. Grainger !
          The bitterness of poor quality remains long after,the sweetness of cheap price.

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          • #20
            Max, I have never used MAC tools so I cannot comment on them. Certainly Snap on has a reputation that speaks for its self amoungst professional mechanics. Kobalt is a Lowes brand made in the USA that look good but i have not bought any yet.

            Klein is a professional electricians choice and channel lock seems to be the preferred brand amoung pipefitters and plumbers.

            Pipe equipment is Rigid all the way.


            Adjustable wrenches I use Crescent and S&K.

            Power tools is Milwaukee first and then Bosch.

            Umm, Max, Grainger is the most expensive place I have ever found and can usually get the exact same thing much cheaper anywhere else. They have variety and inventory on their side but if I don't need it yesterday then they dont get my business.
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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            • #21
              plumber, I agree ... Grainger isn't the place to get a good deal. But they do have very good tools & equipment. When I need something quick, that no one else has (in stock), Grainger almost always has it. I'm an hours drive away, so 2-1/2 hrs., I'm back in business.
              The bitterness of poor quality remains long after,the sweetness of cheap price.

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              • #22
                years back I was a maintenance tech in a steal wire plant a big place, pickling, aniling,draw, and straight and cut. Worked alot of black pipe hard to weld likes to crack, brazing worked best when had to ty in.Have to keep the heat down you know!but that old ridgid threader was a good friend. snap on truck came once a week they costed a lot only bought what i couldnt find elsewear even sometimes had proublems with a broken tool exchange I gave him alot of money and got fed up over a broke impact socket he didnt wana replace, told him I,m going back to craftsman he was nice ever since but lost my respect never had a proublem at sears!

                Be safe out there folks.
                Bob B.
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                Be safe out there folks
                Bob B
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

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                • #23
                  Bob, I had a problem with a Snap-On dealer. The guy was a jerk. I had a 3/8" rachet, I had worn out. He wouldn't replace it, because I didn't buy it from him. We argued and he agreed to rebuild the rachet. He had it for 2 weeks. When I got it back, it was still loose & worn. I went to another dealer. Told him the story, he gave me a new rachet and told me to keep the old one. He told me that other guys were complaining about that dealer. A few months later, he went out of business. There's a bad apple in every barrel.
                  The bitterness of poor quality remains long after,the sweetness of cheap price.

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                  • #24
                    Best tools- For the Remodelor
                    Milwaukee and Bosch for all power,speed and durability. For value for the dollar Craftsman Professional Line when sears has a close out. Most of the time they are made by DeWalt. Another value leader is Hitachi.

                    For sockets and tools...SSK (Kobolt is SSK) and Craftsman for value...If you need it now Snap-On and MAC guys are always available. Hey I can't forget Klein for being durable and cheap in the long run! I notice the higher value tool is better if it does not walk off the job! [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                    [ 02-11-2005, 11:35 AM: Message edited by: paul v. ]

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                    • #25
                      paul,

                      You guys really like your blue Boschs. I never used one. It took me years before I bought a yellow. Who knows maybe a blue is in my future!

                      I keep all of my tools on a short leash.
                      The bitterness of poor quality remains long after,the sweetness of cheap price.

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                      • #26
                        Paul, I thought Kobalt was made by Snap-On. At least that what Lowes told me. SSK makes Craftsman and a few others. From what my Dad has Told me there's only 4 companys that actually make ratchets, sockets, and wrenches. Then they just stamp another name on them. I havent tried Bosch either, my first "yellow" cordless burned up, and i do mean smoked, my second was gray (Porter Cable), and it broke. Now I orange (Ridgid) and couldnt be happier. Guess I got lucky and got a kit that is flawless.

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                        • #27
                          MMM, not sure about the sockets...I have been told different stories....All of them listed are a good value...

                          Yes I like Bosch. If it does not walk off the job they last a long time. Every brand mentioned I think is good, even plain old Craftsman for the dollar value. Though Milwaukee in my opinion makes the best tools period. Though I make a living with my tools I think some of the cheaper brands have improved quality dramatically. I have seen more professionals switch to Ryobi for value and durability. lets not forget the batteries are $40 for 18volts.

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                          • #28
                            As far as hand tools go, Stanley,Mac and Husky are all made in the same plants for the most part. All have lifetime warrantys and are pretty good tools. I have used Mac, Husky, Craftsman, And Some Proto tools. And really haven't seen much difference in any of the four. a good tool is a good tool but the warranty is what usually pushes me into a sale. So It's hard to go wrong with any of the good hand tool brands (for the most part) they all have lifetime replacement.
                            Jeff

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                            • #29
                              I've had a few cheap tools break on me when using them. 1 was a craftsman box wrench. It was defective. When I tried to get it exchanged at sears it took about 45 minutes of clerks and managers running around like dying chickens to figure out how to handle it. Finally, the store manager told the clerk to just exchange it. NOT worth my time.
                              I've had various things go bad on me after the warranty expired, good companies took care of me in spite of the expired warranties. If you go with the company that treats you well you wont be dissapointed. Sears didn't treat me well with tools. However, with appliance issues they did.
                              www.TheWoodCellar.com

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