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  • Who has better tools?

    The other day I was getting some galvenized pipe cut to lenght ( I am running a gas line to my workshop ) and the hardware clerk asked me if I needed the pipe threaded. I replyed, "Yes" thinking, "Dugh, who wouldn't?"

    I follwed the helpful clerk through an employee's only! door where he began to use a RIDGID pipe threader. It was amazing, I mean it was totally cool... It had all sorts of spining, clamping, pumping, cutting - stuff to it (I admitt it, I am a total tool nerd) that it even had an oil bath that engaged while it cut!!! I thought, "man, we don't have any tools like this"

    Then I came back to my shop and had a look around; Table saws, band saws, planers, jointers and things(that if used incorrectly) that not only would slice you into 1/8" stripps, but would leave a nice, clean edge in the process; and thought, "man, plumbers don't have any tools like this!" (as I said, total tool geek!)

    So I ask you, the "Fellow RIDGID Tool Nerds", Plumbers and Wood Workers....

    Who has better tools?

  • #2
    Can't tell you who has better tools but I can tell you that you shouldn't be using galvanized pipe for a gas line if its a natural gas line.
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Badger Dave:
      Can't tell you who has better tools but I can tell you that you shouldn't be using galvanized pipe for a gas line if its a natural gas line.
      I agree. I'm not an expert on this but in my neck of the woods it's black pipe or copper, but never galvanized. Check with your local building inspector or permit office. You may even want to check in to the insurance aspects of DIY gas line installation.
      Lorax
      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll "third" that, it was the first thing that caught my eye in your message. Absolutely NO galvanized pipe for gas line work, you must use black pipe! Check with your local gas supplier, as previously mentioned. If your line gets inspected, it will not pass. The gas itself, and/or additives, will react to the plating.

        I saw the same machine the other day when I was buying some pipe for my new pipe clamps, I can't imagine what that beast must cost. Neat though. I remember when I was a teenager and used to help my Dad on those "extra" weekend jobs. I used to cut those threads manually with a big die cutter and a three-legged pipe vise. Not hard, but I'm sure it wasn't as cool as the Ridgid unit.

        CWS

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        • #5
          Ok Dads,..... Geesh,

          Talk about pooping in the cheerios!

          I guess this is the wrong time to let yall know that I am standing underneath a ladder on the 13th floor and breaking mirrors - ALL AT THE SAME TIME

          - edit by author: to be less "whippershnapperish" -

          Ahem,

          Thank you for the concern,

          At least CW mentioned seeing a pipe fitting machine.

          [ 11-18-2004, 03:16 PM: Message edited by: Desmo888 ]

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Desmo888:


            I follwed the helpful clerk through an employee's only! door where he began to use a RIDGID pipe threader. It was amazing, I mean it was totally cool... It had all sorts of spining, clamping, pumping, cutting - stuff to it (I admitt it, I am a total tool nerd) that it even had an oil bath that engaged while it cut!!! I thought, "man, we don't have any tools like this"
            Thanks! I designed that threader. Here's a link. http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Threadin...ines/index.htm It was the 535A (I also did the 600, 1210, 1215, and 300 Compact)

            [ 11-18-2004, 01:12 PM: Message edited by: smorris ]
            Steve
            www.MorrisGarage.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Desmo,

              Hey man, don't take it personally! [img]smile.gif[/img] I don't believe our responses were meant as critisism. There are all levels of experience here and your mention of threading "galvanized" pipe for gas line raised some very experienced eyebrows. So, not knowing if you were a "novice" the quick response was intended to be helpful and keep you and your family out of harm. I'm sure that only good intentions were meant.

              Kindest regards,

              CWS

              Comment


              • #8
                SMorris,

                Nice job, I'm quite impressed. I didn't have a lot of time to look at the unit in detail, but from what I saw, it looked like one heck of a tool. I presume that the market intent was for the factory or major demand areas like pipefitting shops, gas companies, etc. I remember the old manual method of doing that kind of work and it was a bit slow (probably why my Dad taught me to do it

                Next time I'm over at HD, I'll look at it in more detail. (I appreciate the work of a good designer!)

                Nice work!

                CWS

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks!

                  The current version of the 535 (released in 2002) is just the latest in a line going back 50+ years. We added the automatic chucking mechanism and 3-speed transmission to this one, along with making the entire design more modular. The same platform can be built into a manual or automatic chuck, with a 3-phase 2 speed motor, universal motor, or this 3-speed gearbox, all in a variety of voltages. Wrapping the housing around it was the proverbial 10# in a 5# sack!

                  The 535A is used mostly in production plumbing and sprinkler shops, while the manual chuck 535A is used more in the lower volume shops and on job sites.

                  Older HD stores have our 1822 Threading Machines.
                  Steve
                  www.MorrisGarage.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Boy am I red in the face! [img]redface.gif[/img] [img]redface.gif[/img] [img]redface.gif[/img]

                    Home Depot stores still get our 1822 Threading Machines. Apparently the Canadian HD Stores get a 535, but we didn't switch over in the US.

                    I didn't have anything to do with the design of the 1822. That was done in the mid '80's while I was still designing drain cleaners and tubing tools. I moved to threading for the next machine after the 1822.

                    Sorry for the mis-information! [img]redface.gif[/img] [img]redface.gif[/img] [img]redface.gif[/img]
                    Steve
                    Steve
                    www.MorrisGarage.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a 535 manual chuck threader. Picked it up a couple months ago from a plumber that went out of business. $250 with dies to 2 1/2". Think it was a good deal, How about it Steve.
                      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                      • #12
                        Old 535s never die. They just get new owners.

                        I just watched an old 800 and an 802 machine with stand and die heads sell on eBay in two separate events early this week, one for almost $900 and the other for around $1200. These machines were probably from the '40s or '50s!

                        $250 is a steal!
                        Steve
                        www.MorrisGarage.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Steve,

                          You're right, the HD threader was a Ridgid 1822. Our store here in Corning is about three years old, but they probably got the threader from one of the other stores or even inventory. It's still a neat piece of machinery though.

                          Regards,

                          CWS

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            the OLD MODEL of the 535 is still the best threading machine i have experience!! it is the most reliable model. i have seen units still being used after 35 years and still going strong!! however, regarding the 1822, take caution on the jaw insert finger set on the 1822 unit, since this wears out more often..

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                            • #15
                              Don't know what the codes are where you guys live, but down here they DO use galv pipe for gas line. Gas Co. says its okay to use.

                              and to answer the best tool question, i prefer Ridgid, Mac, Snap On, and some Craftsman

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