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  • Tougher steel for knives

    Just a thought. I have been remarkably pleased with my Ridgid planer. Between the warranty and the abilities I have little room for complaint. However (sic) I am wondering if the knives I received with the unit were soft or if I happened to get a Friday at five o'clock set.I have only planed red cedar, white cedar, soft pine and cypress on it, yet the blade picked up a nick from a red cedar knot(small).
    As these are all soft woods I am puzzeled. I have flipped the knives over to use the other side,(A great feature),but can't help but wonder why a knot would do this. It could make planing expensive.
    Not being too much of a novice at this, I am always checking the material for foreign items, I would like to get more use from each side. The unit removes in increments of 1/32 to 1/16th inches at a time so that isn't the problem. I have run about 100bf through before the occurance. Any ideas?
    Thanks.
    By the way, this is a great resource for me.


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  • #2
    i DONT KNOW FROM JUST WHAT YOU
    SAID BUT ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS RUN A FILE ON THE BLADE ANY -PLACE and you will fine out if it was heat treated it sound like it could even be two hard if your lumber had a tip of a NAIL OR STAPLE small as a match head it could chip it

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    • #3
      I agree with Paul. Also these blades are spinning at a high rate of speed, so be careful running a blade that may be damaged. Think about a new set of blades.

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      • #4
        I would like to see carbide knives...the steel ones just don't last long enough!

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        Bob Stewart
        Build & Fix, Inc.
        Baton Rouge, LA
        Bob Stewart<BR>Build & Fix, Inc.<BR>Baton Rouge, LA

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        • #5
          OK! How about it Ridgid? A set of carbide knives Would Be Nice! Anything in store in the near future?
          I love the 13 inch planer, but you gotta help us out here!

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          • #6
            Looks like you guys have a couple of questions and they all are related. First on the carbide blades; we have not developed a set because of a couple reasons. First is cost. A set of carbide blades will be well into the $100 range and most likely closer to $150. Second HSS (High Speed Steel) does a better job of planing. The shaving action that takes place during a planing operation is better suited to HSS because HSS can be sharpened to a much finer edge than carbide. Finally with carbide blades you would have to be extremely careful about running metal through the planer, as not to ruin a $120 set of single edge knives as oppose to one side of a $30 double edge set of knives.

            As far as the knots go, that is one of the most difficult parts of a planing operation especially in softwoods. Softwoods crush a lot more during the planing operation so when the knives get to knot they have a lot more to cut off than a knot in hardwood. I don't know if there is a good fix, other than take light passes in knotty woods. Another hint is to loosen the blades and shift them opposite directions slightly to compensate for the knot.

            If you have any more questions please feel free to send them directly to me.

            Jake

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            • #7
              Good information and points well taken. How much shallower a cut should I attempt? When the knives got thier nick on the knot, I was removing approx. 1/64th of an inch. It leaves a cleaner surface with lighter passes.

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              • #8
                From my experience, soft wood knots are death on planer knives. I generally work with rough lumber (it is cheaper ) and I have never damaged a knife on hardwoods; cherry, walnut and oak just buzz on through with no problem but hemlock or pine seem to tear up knives. If you are going to work with soft woods, keep a spare set of knives on hand.

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                • #9
                  I guess that is a curse of regional dwelling. Living in the south, pine and cypress are plentifull as is red oak, but most other hardwoods are not cost effective.
                  Just for the record, the nick came from cypress and there were no nails. I have a metal detector. Working with fresh material from the mill, it is a necessary item.

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