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  • Question for DeltaCAD users...

    I downloaded the DeltaCAD trial version, but the help files isn't producing me with enough info to turn out what I want to.

    Anyone have the full version and manual, does the manual do a better job of explaining things than the help files?

    I know the size of the things I want to draw. I know the distance they are from a reference point. Problem is getting them on the drawing in that exact location. Must be some way of setting a reference point in the program?
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

  • #2
    John,

    Here's what I do:

    In the bottom right corner of the deltacad screen, there is a pair of coordinates. As you move your pointer, these coordinates will change. I ALWAYS start my drawings with the extreme bottom left corner at coord. 0, 0. As you work on parts of a drawing, you can adjust how much you see of it with the SCALE button and arrows, also in the bottom right corner. This the VIEWING scale. To alter the drawing scale, i.e. 1" = 12', go to OPTIONS, then DRAWING SCALE. You can also specify the initial scale and position in the Options menu.

    Another tip: Let's say that you want to draw a horizontal line 12" long. you CAN select the horizontal line tool and then click where you want to start and drag to the right or left until the coordinate reading tells you that you've gone far enough. An easier way (at least for me) is to click where you want the line to start, and then 12 (there will be a place to enter it in the bottom left corner. Then hit ENTER, and the line is drawn. If you want the line to go to the left, then enter a negative value.

    Hope this helps,
    De Colores,
    Dow
    Boerne, TX

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi John:

      I'm not a deltacad user, but I do use cad. Your reference point is really just a concept because you can start dwg anywhere you want. Usually, it's easier for us to think in terms of an absolute starting point so we can envision the dwg and start constructing the plan. As DOW noted, 0,0 in the lower left corner works good for most of us. You should also think in terms of an xy coordinate system with 0,0 as the origin. Now, you can find 0,0 on the screen by putting in a point or starting a line from 0,0 by typing 0,0 as the point or start point. Now you can move the view around with the dwg window sliders to get 0,0 in the lower left. This is only the beginning. You should have some idea of how large the thing is you want to draw and you know what paper sizes you can print on with your printer. If you are using 8x11, then you have about 7.5x10.5 of useable area on the paper. You could round that to 7x10 to keep things simple. If you want to draw something 36" wide and 24" high, then the dwg must be scaled to fit the 36" inside the paper area and keep the drawn items in correct scale to each other. To maximize the use of the drawing area, you might pick a dwg scale of 1"=4" which would give you a scaled area of 28"x40" within the 7x10 dwg area on paper. The easiest way to keep things inside the dwg area is to draw a rectangle representing the paper dwg area scaled. So, using 0,0 as a starting point, you might make a rectangle whose diagonal points are 0,0 and 28,40. Zoom all or zoom extents to get the display to show the full rectangle and you can see how to position the parts in the dwg to keep them inside the printing area scaled. Look at shapes for a rectangle or use lines to make the rectangle. After drawing, you could use the rectangle as the dwg border or put it in a non printable layer so it doesn't print, if deltacad offers that. Just holler if you would like more tips.

      Bob Phillips

      Comment


      • #4
        I'll have to try that 0,0 thing.
        This is the problem I'm having.
        I wanted to draw the layout of my shop, and start planning an addition and how things would fit in. I got the shop permiter just fine. When it came time to add the doors, I knew where the doors were, but getting them in the proper locations to scale.

        I know the one door is exactly 4' from the corner, but how do I determine where 4' from the corner is? I thought you could set a reference point, like to that corner, then some how tell the program to move 4' to scale down the wall, then draw a 1/4 circle with the radius of the door width.

        As much time as I spent in this program already, and have nothing, I could have drawn it 10 times over on my drafting board. But I really want to learn so I can post my project plans on my web site. Photo's of my hand drawn plans aren't worth a crap on my site.
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

        Comment


        • #5
          AHA! Now I see what you're trying to do. I usually just draw a temporary line for the distance needed. For instance, if I need a door 4' from the corner, then I move slightly off of the wall line, and choose a different color and draw a 4' line, Then I draw myh door where it goes and go back and erase the temp line from the Edit menu.

          Probably not the most elegant solution, but it works for me.

          Let me see know how it works for you.
          De Colores,
          Dow
          Boerne, TX

          Comment


          • #6
            I just want to say thanks to you guys for helping me out with Delta CAD. I have gotten further in a week than I have in years with high priced, more extravigant programs. I actually sat last weekend and drew my next shop project.

            If anyone has interests in learning CAD, I would have to say Delta CAD is the place to start. Instructions are written in a way you don't need an engineers degree to understand. Every drawing action gives on screen instructions on what you need to do.

            After years of T-squares and triangles (not to mention erasers) this is absolutely the best way to do things.
            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

            Comment


            • #7
              Woody I know your flustration learning cadd. Years ago I spent all winter teaching my self cadd with a program called Gencadd. This was the best cadd program ever. Autocadd bought them up and stopped selling it. No support so drivers were not available for the newer printers. Just dot matrix. Just hang in there and you will be fine. Good luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Old Geezer. Since the last post, I've pretty much mastered the Delta Cad Program. I'm drawing like there's no tomarrow. Have done several intense drawings, and hopefully, someday, I can get them on my site for downloading.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

                Comment


                • #9
                  Offset in DeltaCAD

                  Originally posted by UO_Woody
                  I know the size of the things I want to draw. I know the distance they are from a reference point. Problem is getting them on the drawing in that exact location. Must be some way of setting a reference point in the program?


                  Choose the tool you want to use. Delta will put a dialog box at the bottom asking for a starting point. Default is absolute co-ordinates.

                  The dialog box will now ask for an offset, or an angle for the result. In case of an angular line, it will be angle.

                  The box will ask for the next parameter, if necessary.

                  If you want to start at an offset from a point, use the point button at the far left (one point), click on start point, then write offset (x,y form).

                  If you want to use angular offset, draw an angular line at (angle | distance), then start at the end of the resulting line.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    reference point

                    Originally posted by UO_Woody
                    I know the one door is exactly 4' from the corner, but how do I determine where 4' from the corner is? I thought you could set a reference point, like to that corner, then some how tell the program to move 4' to scale down the wall, then draw a 1/4 circle with the radius of the door width.
                    Open the line menu. With the parallel line tool (near center screen) select the wall from where you want the 4' off set, and move the cursor in the right direction to approach the door and type 4' [enter]. You will get a line which intersects the side wall ot the insertion point.

                    Open File | Symbols and you will find a set of Door symbols with up, down, left, right parameters you can select. Each has a red cross aty the insertion point.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Realize that Woody posted his question back in 2003, but hopefully someone else with the same Q will benefit from your reply.
                      "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                      John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Question for DeltaCAD users...

                        I have an odd question.

                        How do you draw a cylinder? I tried with two circles and lines connecting but mustve had the angles wrong. And I couldn't erase the parts of the lines that shouldn't be seen.

                        Thanks in advance.

                        Phil

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Question for DeltaCAD users...

                          Haven't used DelltaCAD but in AutoCAD you can extrude a shape such as a cylinder easily. Draw the circle then select it and use the EXTRUDE button; move the mouse in the direction you wish the extrusion and then drag or better yet type in on the command line the distance you want and hit enter. You're done!
                          "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                          John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Question for DeltaCAD users...

                            Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                            Haven't used DelltaCAD but in AutoCAD you can extrude a shape such as a cylinder easily.
                            Unfortunately, Autocad extrudes dollars from your pocket even easier.
                            I've been using CadStd at home for a while and it seems to do all I need. We have Autocad 2007 with Raster Design at work, but I dont have $4 grand to get it at home.
                            Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Question for DeltaCAD users...

                              Yeah, neither do I, but I do use it at work. I have IntelliCAD at home, and it is the most compatible CAD package to AutoCAD I could find at a reasonable price. You can get IntelliCAD 6 Pro for $249
                              "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                              John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                              Comment

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